1. The WordReference Forums have moved to new forum software. (Details)

Bonifico Bancario Vista Fattura

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by QUIETE, Jul 6, 2007.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. QUIETE Junior Member

    ITALY
    ITALY / Russian
    Qqualcuno mi potrebbe aiutare di tradurre BONIFICO BANCARIO VISTA FATTURA in inglese?
    Bank transfer... at sight invoice? Non mi suona bene.. :-(

    Grazie mille!
     
  2. PAJAKI Senior Member

    Lombardy
    italy, italian
    Bank transfer at sight. E' giusto, non serve, secondo me, ripetere invoice.
     
  3. QUIETE Junior Member

    ITALY
    ITALY / Russian
    Grazie 1000!
     
  4. buio1981 New Member

    North Italy
    Italan
    C'è qualche madre lingua che può confermare il "Bank transfer at sight"?
    Anche io utilizzo questa formula con operatori britannici e mi piacerebbe sapere se è corretta.
    Grazie a chiunque può essere di aiuto.
    Ciao :)
     
  5. Anja.Ann

    Anja.Ann Senior Member

    Lombardia
    Italian
    Ciao, Buio :)

    Non sono madrelingua!
    Però "bonifico bancario vista fattura" significa che il bonifico bancario sarà da effettuare alla presentazione della fattura da parte del fornitore, cioè il pagamento è dovuto, da parte del cliente, non appena riceve la fattura: secondo me, "invoice" deve necessariarmente apparire nella frase. Proverei così: "bank transfer upon receipt of invoice".

    Aspettiamo madrelingua! :)
     
  6. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    Appunto, stavo per dire esattamente la stessa cosa. Se non dici a vista fattura non si capisce niente!:)

    You can certainly say something will be " payable/paid by electronic transfer upon receipt of invoice" .

    At sight.:) Non si adatta alla frase in questione, però, a mio avviso.:)
     
  7. Anja.Ann

    Anja.Ann Senior Member

    Lombardia
    Italian
    Ciao, London! :)

    Grrrrrr ... pensare che stavo scrivendo "payment to be made by bank wire transfer ..." :D
    Mi manca sempre qualcosa! :)
     
  8. longplay Senior Member

    italian
    "Bank transfer" va benissimo (avviene "automaticamente" in via telematica con SWIFT o altri sistemi: wire e electronic non sono necessari, in generale);)
     
  9. Anja.Ann

    Anja.Ann Senior Member

    Lombardia
    Italian
    Ciao, LP :)

    Grazie. Sì, mi riferivo al fatto che dato che è "il pagamento" ad essere richiesto "a vista/ricevimento fattura", è effettivamente più corretto precisare "payable/payment upon receipt of invoice", del resto "bank wire/electronic transfer" è la modalità del pagamento.
     
  10. longplay Senior Member

    italian
    Forse c'è già scritto: "Pagamento":- (e poi) bank transfer upon...
     
  11. Anja.Ann

    Anja.Ann Senior Member

    Lombardia
    Italian
    Sì, sarebbe bene avere una bella frase completa. :)
     
  12. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    Io in genere parlo di wire transfer, ma electronic transfer pare sia più "attuale".:) Bank transfer pure va bene , anche se è ormai un po' datato.;)

    Comunque, bonifico bancario vista fattura significa "payable by electronic transfer upon receipt of invoice". E confermo che non si dice "bank transfer at sight (of invoice)". Provate a googlarlo (solo siti UK)...nulla di nulla.:)
     
  13. longplay Senior Member

    italian
    Ci deve essere un vecchio thread sul perchè non sarebbe più necessario dire trasferimento "telefonico", "telegrafico" o "wire transfer", "cable transfer" ecc. .
    "A vista" è errato in ogni caso, perchè i bonifici sono sempre "a vista": tutto dipende dalla "valuta" (per il beneficiario).:)
     
  14. curiosone

    curiosone Senior Member

    Romagna, Italy
    AE - hillbilly ;)
    I won't quibble about the "at sight" part - although I personally like it. But I totally disagree about translating "bonifico bancario" to "wire transfer." While a bank transfer is (by nature) electronic, so "electronic transfer" is technically correct (both for a regular bank transfer and for a wire transfer), there is a definite distinction made by banks between a simple "bank transfer" and a "wire transfer" - at least in the United States. I know from personal experience. A wire transfer is required for overseas transfers, and it's more expensive than a simple bank-to-bank transfer handled between American banks. But I know this has already been discussed on the Forum, here: http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=2419859&highlight=bonifico+bank+transfer
     
  15. Phil9 Senior Member

    London
    UK English
    It's certainly in very current use in the UK today. We don't say 'wire transfer'. This is AE. SWIFT transfer is used in banking / legal circles but it's not a term that's used by the general population. 'Direct bank transfer' is also used.
     
  16. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    Is it? I got into the habit of saying wire transfer when one of our British suppliers wrote to me and asked when we were going to issue one! Like Curio, I had also assumed that a bank transfer was a "domestic" transaction whilst an electronic one was an international one, but I don't work for Accounts, so I'll take your word for that, Phil.:)
     
  17. Phil9 Senior Member

    London
    UK English
    Hi, LC. I'm a solicitor, not an accountant, but for many years I've dealt with transferring money when clients complete the purchase of a property, etc. Generically, 'bank transfer' covers everything.

    In legal circles, lawyers always talk about a 'telegraphic transfer' (shortened usually to a TT) probably harking back to the days when transfers were indeed effected by telegraph!! Use of the phrase still persists today, rather like we still say 'to dial a number even though we haven't had dials for years! TTs are always done electronically of course and money is sent and received the same day.

    These days in the UK, a TT would also be referred to as a 'CHAPS transfer/payment' or just 'a CHAPS'. CHAPS means Clearing House Automated Payment System. Put 'CHAPS payment' into Google for further details. You might say 'I'll send you the money by CHAPS' It has even become a verb so you could say: 'will you CHAPS me the money tomorrow?'

    For less urgent payments, BACS payments are very common, usually for regular payments. BACS means Bank Account Clearing System payment. It takes 2-3 days to arrive. In the UK most people working for larger employers, and many medium/small employers, get their monthly salary by BACS.

    In the UK, an international bank transfer would normally be referred to as a SWIFT transfer, although, outside professional circles, the average person may not be familiar with the term unless they have had to send one!

    Finally, with most people conducting their private banking online, it is common to transfer money by direct bank transfer. This is done using Internet banking. These transfers are normally free. Money doesn't always arrive the same day. A new system of bank transfers called Faster Payments (less than £10,000 I believe) was introduced a few years ago. This ensures payments arrive the same day instead of the banks having the money for a few days!:)
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2013
  18. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    Thanks for that, Phil.:) I must say, I hadn't heard the expression "telegraphic transfer" in years, but as you say it's like saying "to dial a number", when the last time I really dialled a number was probably in the 80s!:D . The SWIFT code I am familiar with, but I've never heard of a SWIFT transfer (not surprising, I've been ex-pat for over 30 years!).:D

    Getting back to the original question. Would you agree (in your experience) that we wouldn't say "bank transfer at sight (of invoice)"? I read it and thought..translation! and Google would appear to confirm that, hence my suggestion (very similar to Anja's;)).

    PS the transfers the (very large) Italian company I work for arrange are not TTs, on the basis of what you just explained, because the money is never received on the same day (the value date is always 2 or 3 days after the date of issue, no wonder our suppliers all get so hopping mad;)), so from now on I will now call them bank transfers.;)
     
  19. Phil9 Senior Member

    London
    UK English
    Well, I've never actually heard the expression 'bank transfer at sight of invoice'. It doesn't sound like banking terminology at all.

    In the same way that some suppliers put on their invoices 'strictly 30 days' meaning you have to pay them within 30 days, perhaps this expression means that you have to pay by bank transfer on receipt of the invoice. Difficult to know because Quiete hasn't given the context or the document in which this phrase appears! :(

    By the way TTs only arrive on the same day within the UK. SWIFT transfers are international and may take a few days to arrive.

    You mention using 'wire transfer' since a British supplier wrote asking for one. Perhaps the employee was American. In 35 years as a solicitor I've never heard that expression here. It's true that I only deal with UK lawyers/banks/companies.
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2013
  20. stellamy New Member

    Italian
    For me the best is:
    money transfer upon receipt of invoice. Let me know something...........sometimes I have the same trouble!
     
  21. Connie Eyeland

    Connie Eyeland Senior Member

    Brescia (Italia)
    Italiano
    Ciao a tutti.:)

    Spero di essere d'aiuto riepilogando tutti i traducenti del termine italiano "bonifico bancario", in modo da fare chiarezza, anche se Phil ha già contribuito in modo fondamentale allo scopo (soprattutto dal punto di vista dell'uso dei termini in BE).
    I possibili traducenti sono infatti numerosi, sia a causa della diversa terminologia usata in AE e BE, che a causa delle diverse tipologie di bonifico esistenti:

    - Il termine "electronic transfer" (per esteso "Electronic Funds Transfer" o EFT = "Trasferimento Elettronico di Fondi" o TEF) definisce tutti i sistemi di pagamento elettronici (ossia le movimentazioni di denaro da un proprietario ad un altro che avvengono per via informatica/telematica senza lo spostamento fisico di moneta cartacea, ma utilizzando la cosiddetta "moneta elettronica"), quindi non solamente il bonifico bancario (in inglese bank [wire/cable/telegraphic/SWIFT] transfer), ma anche i pagamenti attraverso Bancomat, POS, carta di credito, assegno elettronico, PayPal, ecc.

    Pertanto, di per sé, il termine "electronic transfer" non sarebbe esattamente il traducente di "bonifico bancario": il primo identifica la famiglia che comprende il secondo (come dire "frutta" e "mela"). Vedi anche qui.
    Ma siccome tra i vari sistemi di pagamento telematico succitati, quello maggiormente utilizzato dalle aziende per pagare merci e servizi è il bonifico, è frequente che le aziende stesse usino il termine "electronic transfer" intendendo specificamente il bonifico.

    - "(Standard/Regular/Normal/Ordinary) bank transfer" sarebbe il bonifico bancario ordinario. Può avvenire sia allo sportello che per via telematica (vedi) ed è oggi utilizzato solo per i pagamenti nazionali, a conferma di quanto sospettato da LC.
    Come dichiarato da Phil, il termine "bank transfer" è spesso usato come nome comune generico per tutti i tipi di bonifico, soprattutto nel Regno Unito (vedi) e direi anche nel resto d'Europa, mentre negli Stati Uniti per lo più identifica i bonifici nazionali tra conti intestati a persone diverse ma presso filiali della stessa banca, laddove "bank-to-bank transfer" indica invece i bonifici da un conto all'altro di una stessa persona ma presso diversi istituti bancari (link).

    - "Bank wire transfer" AE (normalmente abbreviato in "wire transfer" AE - link link link link link ) è invece il bonifico bancario "espresso" (sta al bonifico ordinario come l'airmail sta alla posta ordinaria, per riprendere il paragone fatto da Curiosone in un altro thread), che ha un costo di operazione molto più elevato rispetto al bonifico ordinario. Permette l'accredito del pagamento sul conto del destinatario entro 1 giorno ed è il tipo di bonifico che le aziende usano preferibilmente per tutte le transazioni internazionali (international wire transfer) o, più raramente, per quelle nazionali (domestic wire transfer) che siano particolarmente urgenti o di importo molto elevato.
    Nel primo caso (transazione internazionale), è detto anche "cable transfer" (link link link link link).


    - I bonifici "espressi" si chiamano anche "T/T" (=telegraphic/telex transfer) poiché in passato avvenivano via telegrafo/telex.
    Questo termine è tuttora in uso nel Regno Unito e nei Paesi che con esso hanno rapporti commerciali preferenziali (come sinonimo britannico del nordamericano "wire transfer").
    Inoltre è comunemente utilizzato nei Paesi leader dell'export (Cina, India, area Far East in generale) per riferirsi specificamente al pagamento anticipato delle transazioni internazionali che non vengono regolate con Lettera di Credito perché di importo relativamente piccolo; la locuzione standard in cui il termine è inserito è infatti "T/T in advance". Vedi un esempio qui.

    - Poiché le transazioni internazionali avvengono utilizzando un codice detto BIC/SWIFT, il sinonimo maggiormente in uso in BE come corrispondente dell'AE "international wire transfer" è "SWIFT transfer", come testimoniato anche da Phil.

    N.B.: Non corretto, come traducente di "bonifico bancario", è invece il termine "bank wire" (che pur tuttavia viene spesso usato con quel significato), perché in realtà identifica un sistema di messaggistica tra istituti bancari per notificare le varie transazioni; non identifica la transazione stessa. Vedi qui e qui.

    Qui si può trovare un riepilogo delle differenze tra le diverse tipologie e terminologie inglesi relative ai bonifici.

    Resta il fatto che colloquialmente i vari termini vengono usati più o meno intercambiabilmente, soprattutto nei Paesi non madreligua inglesi, che usano questi termini solo quando commerciano con l'estero; ma in documenti ufficiali di lavoro sarebbe preferibile usare di volta in volta il termine corretto a seconda del caso.
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2013
  22. curiosone

    curiosone Senior Member

    Romagna, Italy
    AE - hillbilly ;)
    I tend agree with both of you, that "wire transfer" (like "dialing a phone" or even "ringing someone up") is an archaic term deriving from the days when long-distance funds were sent by telegraph (or "vaglia"). However I don't think it's specifically an AE term - simply that that it's still used (by some banks) when referring to international (especially intercontinental) bank transfers. I have worked quite a lot (in Europe, and with the Middle East) with SWIFT transfers, which are basically the same thing - and which are distinguished from domestic bank transfers. The whole point I'm trying to make (from having dealt with international money transfers all my life - both to/from the United States, and between different countries - especially non-E.U. countries) is that the term "wire transfer" (even tho' archaic) is still used (archaic or not).

    P.S.: And I now see Connie has supplied a very thorough specification of how all terms are used (both for domestic and international transfers). SWIFT codes are also used by U.S. banks, but as it has been pointed out, not everyone is familiar with this term (unless they deal regularly with SWIFT transfers).
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2013
  23. Phil9 Senior Member

    London
    UK English
    Connie, il tuo post è un capolavoro, grazie. :)

    Curiosone, hai ragione che 'wire transfer' è un termine in uso tutt'ora, ma è poco usato in BE.

    Però, la domanda originale (nel 2007!!) fu come si direbbe 'bonifico bancario vista fattura' in Inglese! Quiete non ci ha detto dove era scritto questa frase né il contesto. Qualcuno ha un'idea di dove si vedrebbe questa frase. Immagino su una fattura?
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2013
  24. Connie Eyeland

    Connie Eyeland Senior Member

    Brescia (Italia)
    Italiano
    @Phil:
    Ti ringrazio di cuore!:) Ho pensato fosse meglio far chiarezza sui traducenti di "bonifico" perché si erano espressi dubbi e opinioni contrastanti in merito, prima che tu intervenissi a fare chiarezza sui termini in uso in BE.
    Appena ho tempo, scrivo un post in merito alla locuzione "a vista fattura" (anticipo intanto che ciò che ha detto LC è vero, cioè non è appropriata l'espressione "bank transfer at sight"). La frase si scrive sulle fatture o sulle conferme d'ordine ai clienti, come condizione di pagamento.
    Complimenti per il livello del tuo italiano! Eccellente!:thumbsup:

    EDIT: Cross-posting con Curiosone!;)
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2013
  25. curiosone

    curiosone Senior Member

    Romagna, Italy
    AE - hillbilly ;)
    It's a quite common "term of payment" used on Italian invoices. If you don't like "payment at sight" I suppose it could be translated as "immediate payment by bank transfer" - although as Connie has pointed out (and I agree), it's best (especially since, if we need to translate, it's probably an international transfer) to be more specific about what kind of transfer it is (SWIFT, if outside the U.E. - even if just from Italy to the UK).
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2013
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page