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  1. miamijaguey Senior Member

    Miami, Florida, USA
    English, USA
    Puse esta pregunta ayer por la tarde sin resultados. Espero que alguien me puede ayudar, se lo agradecería mucho. :)

    Estoy tratando de ver el significado de Brazas en el Himno de la Armada de Chile:

    Listos a cazar las velas
    tesa, Brazas a ceñir.

    El DRAE solo menciona que es una medida de más o menos dos varas (entre otras cosas), pero me parece que se refiere a las cuerdas que usan para sujetar o ajustar las velas. ¿Qué dicen?
     
  2. ana55 Senior Member

    madrid
    spanish argentina
    No conozco el himno chileno, pero brazas es una medida náutica, y ceñir, es (en navegacion a vela) ir en dirccion al viento, entonces ceñir una braza es hacer un esfuerzo por ir en rumbo hacia el viento, no derivando (es decir no dejandote caer, no alejandote de la direccion del viento).
     
  3. miamijaguey Senior Member

    Miami, Florida, USA
    English, USA
    Mil gracias, Ana, me has aclarado esto de maravilla ;)
     
  4. Bil

    Bil Senior Member

    English USA
    Hola

    Sí, Ana tiene razón. La palabra "brazas" se traduce por "braces," the rigging for trimming the sails. They are adjusted, but I think the nautical term (verb) would be that the braces are "fit."

    'braces to be fit.'

    Sí, yo lo sé—poco poético. :)
     
  5. miamijaguey Senior Member

    Miami, Florida, USA
    English, USA
    So, a good translation of this phrase would be "Trim the sails"? Or would "Stay the course" be better? I can see reasons for both.
     
  6. Bil

    Bil Senior Member

    English USA
    Please, I beg of you, no more of that "stay the course" GB Jr. stuff. :) How about "braces to be manned," or "trim the yards" if you're feelin' a little salty.
     
  7. miamijaguey Senior Member

    Miami, Florida, USA
    English, USA
    LOL... I'm not the salty dog here, my co-workers are U.S. Navy and Marines and brought this problem to me. Now that we know what's being discussed, they can come up with their own conclusions. I think trim the sails or yards sounds perfect, but I'm a ground forces kinda guy, call me a landlubber if you must ;)

    Army CPT miamijaguey
     
  8. Bil

    Bil Senior Member

    English USA
    Oh, I'm just disappointed that I spent time hunting down "braces" only to have it tossed overboard. :)

    Oh, well, best of luck to you, Miami.

    b.
     
  9. miamijaguey Senior Member

    Miami, Florida, USA
    English, USA
    No, don't get me wrong, the info about braces is very enlightening! We're just trying to find as much background as possible to find a suitable expression in English (this is all very idiomatic and cultural, speaking of naval culture more than hispanic culture). I appreciate your input, and I'm only tossing my lunch at the rail after reading all about Spanglish :p .
     

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