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  1. cacolazatchok Senior Member

    france
    Hello,
    I was actually wondering if there was any difference between the expression : "To break up with someone", and the expression "To break up on someone" that i just heard. I know that "to break up with someone" would be translated in french as "rompre avec quelqu'un, does "to break up on someone" mean the same? Is it a correct expression?
    Thank you!
     
  2. massromantic

    massromantic Senior Member

    Washington, DC
    US English
    I have never heard "to break up on someone", and Google only returned 4 results for that phrase in quotation marks. In what context did you hear it?
     
  3. cacolazatchok Senior Member

    france
    Well, i heard it in a song, so i was wondering if the sentence was correct..
     
  4. Keith Bradford

    Keith Bradford Senior Member

    Brittany, NW France
    English (Midlands UK)
    You're breaking up on me = Je vous entends mal, votre portable n'a prèsque plus de signal.
     
  5. cacolazatchok Senior Member

    france
    Thanks! That makes sense!
     
  6. massromantic

    massromantic Senior Member

    Washington, DC
    US English
    :eek: Aha, Keith Bradford is correct! I was stuck on the idea of relationships.

    (The song must be "Telephone", right? I was just listening to it too, shame on me.)
     
  7. frenchforschool Junior Member

    English
    I think it makes more sense to use the phrase "break up with someone"
    I've never heard the phrase "break up on someone"
     
  8. akaAJ Senior Member

    New York
    American English, Yiddish
    Song lyrics are notorious for unusual, unidiomatic inventions, and "hearing", as opposed to "reading", is notoriously prone to error. Further context would be greatly appreciated. "To break up" can mean "to burst into tears" or "to burst into laughter", somewhat involuntarily (the Carol Burnett show was well known for this -- in fact some cast members viewed it as a challenge to see if they could cause Harvey Korman to "break up" and fall out of character), and the "on" then simply points to the person at the other end of the "break up".
     
  9. cacolazatchok Senior Member

    france
    Keith Bradford is right indeed.
    The song is "telephone", i couldn't remember the name....
    Here come the lyrics:
    "You called, I can’t hear a thing.
    I have got no service
    in the club, you see,
    What did you say?
    Oh, you’re breaking up on me
    Sorry, I cannot hear you"
     
  10. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    I've heard people say "You're breaking up on me" while on a mobile phone. I'm with Keith.
     

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