bring along

Discussion in 'English Only' started by wong, Jan 31, 2007.

  1. wong New Member

    Cantonese
    what's the usage of "bring along"
     
  2. Vikorr Senior Member

    Australia, English
    It is used when you want another person to bring <something> with them.

    Eg. Bring along an umbrella, as it looks like it will rain this afternoon.
     
  3. wong New Member

    Cantonese
    Is there any different meaning between "bring" and "bring along"
     
  4. Dmitry_86

    Dmitry_86 Senior Member

    That is exactly what I was going to ask. Is there any difference between the two? They look identical according to what my dictionary says: "If you bring someone or something along, you bring them with you when you come to a place".

    Second, where do we usually put a noun: after "bring along" or between "bring" and "along"?

    My dictionary gives the following examples

    1) They brought along Laura Jane in a pram
    2) Dad brought a notebook along to the beach, in case he was seized by sudden inspiration

    Why are these nouns used in two different positions here?

    Best
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2010
  5. JamesM

    JamesM à la Mod

    If I am the boss and I say to one of my employees "bring me a pencil" I am not implying that I want to see them, only that I want a pencil. If I say "Come to my office and bring along a pencil" I mean that I want to see the employee in my office and I want that employee to bring a pencil when he or she comes. The pencil may be for the employee or for me.

    For another example, if I say "Get the Williams file and bring our visitor to my office" I mean "Pick up the file folder for client/case for Williams and escort our visitor to my office". It doesn't mean that you should plan to stay after escorting the visitor. I want the visitor and the folder. If I say "Get the Williams file and bring our visitor along to my office" it implies that I want to see you, the folder and the visitor in my office.
     
  6. Dmitry_86

    Dmitry_86 Senior Member

    James, your capability of explaining complicated things using your great knowledge really amazes me! :) Thanks for these examples!

    If I have understood everything correctly, when we add "along" we mean that we want a person to whom we are applying to see at some time in future. Your examples confirm my supposition.

    How about my second question in the previous post? I will repeat it here:

    1) They brought along Laura Jane in a pram
    2) Dad brought a notebook along to the beach, in case he was seized by sudden inspiration

    Why are these nouns used in two different positions here?

    Best
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2010
  7. JamesM

    JamesM à la Mod

    I don't have an answer for that one. :) Some phrasal verbs seem to handle being split up better than others. To me, "bring along" can be split up without causing problems. I could just as easily say or write "They brought Laura Jane along in a pram" as "They brought along Laura Jane in a pram". (In fact, the first one sounds betters to me.)
     
  8. Bevj

    Bevj Allegra Moderata

    Girona, Spain
    English (U.K.)
    I agree with JamesM - I would say that in your examples, 'They brought along Laura Jane' and 'They brought Laura Jane along' are interchangeable.
    However, that this isn't always the case. For example, 'When I come to visit you, I'll bring him along' sounds OK whereas 'When I come to visit you, I'll bring along him' definitely doesn't!
    I'm afraid that I can't give you an answer as to why, either :(
     
  9. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I don't think I would use "bring along".
    It seems rather unnecessary.
    How could I bring the umbrella otherwise?
    In this context, it does not seem to me to be a "phrasal verb". The meaning is quite clear from the standard definitions of bring and along.

    There is, of course, a quite different phrasal verb "bring along".
    Meaning: Help someone improve
    Example: Her coach has BROUGHT her ALONG a lot in the last six months.
    This may also be used with anything that one cares for and nurtures - such as onions.
     
  10. Dmitry_86

    Dmitry_86 Senior Member

    Thanks, Bevj! I know the example with "him" would be wrong if I placed "him" at the end of the phrase rather than in between. That is different. "Him" is pronoun like "her" or "their", for instance, and the location of a pronoun does not cause any questions.

    I have heard that there are phrasal verbs of two different kinds. The first one allows us to split them into two parts and insert a noun in the middle like we have done in the phrase "... bring someone along ...". The second one makes us join two parts together and put a noun only after a verb. However, I did not know that there are verbs that can be used in BOTH patterns at the same time. That is new for me!
     
  11. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
  12. defesad New Member

    Thai
    JamesM, The explanation is clear for request (imperative) sentence.
    Any difference in these:
    He brought a laptop today.
    He brought along a laptop today.
     
  13. JamesM

    JamesM à la Mod

    Well, they could be interchangeable in some contexts. In other contexts, the "along" would indicate that the laptop was his and he brought it in order to use it. It would help to have a little more background of the imagined situation.
     
  14. defesad New Member

    Thai
    Thank you very much. That is very heplful.
    Is there any usage book/dictionary that deals with things like this?
     
  15. JamesM

    JamesM à la Mod

    Not that I'm aware of. The link that panjandrum provided in post #12 would be a good starting point.
     
  16. Annakrutitskaya Senior Member

    Russian
    I see that this post dates back to 2006. Still I would like to thank you, James, for this perceptive and helpful explanation! :)
     
  17. Annakrutitskaya Senior Member

    Russian
  18. Annakrutitskaya Senior Member

    Russian
    Hello!

    Does 'bring along' in the following sentence has the meaning suggested earlier as "Help someone improve"?
    Google Glass update to bring along Android 4.4 and more
    (http://androidcommunity.com/google-glass-update-to-bring-along-android-4-4-and-more-20140414/)


    What would be a correct meaning: Google has released an update which improves Android 4.4 or Google update introduces, implements, uses with the glass (brings along) new Android 4.4?

    Thank you!

    Google Glass update to bring along Android 4.4 and more
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 19, 2015
  19. JamesM

    JamesM à la Mod

    I would read it as "Google Glass update includes with it Android 4.4 and more". Another way to look at it would be "Google Glass update is accompanied by Android 4.4 and more", but the "and more" sounds a bit odd to me in that context.
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2014
  20. Annakrutitskaya Senior Member

    Russian
    Thank you very much! :)
     

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