Bring it on

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Antonio, Aug 9, 2004.

  1. Antonio Senior Member

    Monterrey
    Mexico/Spanish
    Hi Group,

    Can you tell me the meaning and a complete definition of the word "Bring it on" and for what examples can I use this word? I have here in my book and says "to pick or start a fight" "you can use it in sports too (can you give me an example)" and "to bring something on" Ex. Teacher I did my homework, "ok, bring it on".

    If I am missing a definition of this word please let me know.

    Thanks in advance,
    Antonio.
     
  2. jacinta Senior Member

    California
    USA English
    "Bring it on" normally is used in the context of an ensuing fight of some kind. It can also be used when confronted with something difficult. It means "just try to beat us; we're ready to rumble", used as a type of threat. For instance, in the US fight on terrorism, politicians may say "bring it on". In sports, two rival teams will compete for a win and one will say to the other," Ok, just bring it on!"

    I hope this helps.
     
  3. Antonio Senior Member

    Monterrey
    Mexico/Spanish
    Bring it on in sports means, "that's all that you got or show me what you got" am I right? and "to bring something on" Ex. Teacher I did my homework, "ok, bring it on", that application of the word is right and rude at the same time?

    Thanks in advance,
    Antonio.
     
  4. jacinta Senior Member

    California
    USA English
    Yes, that's it with the sports question. As far as the teacher goes, this is not correct. You: "Teacher, I did my homework". Teacher: "Okay, hand it in".

    Bring it on is a slang expression. A teacher may use slang, but bring it on isn't the right usage in this case.
     
  5. elroy

    elroy Motley mod

    Chicago, IL
    American English, Palestinian Arabic
    Agreed. The teacher might say "bring it up" (i.e., to the front of the classrom) but certainly not "bring it on."

    Other possibilities: hand it in (as mentioned), turn it in, give it in
     
  6. Antonio Senior Member

    Monterrey
    Mexico/Spanish
    So, to get the picture, basically bring it on means "to pick or start a fight" "show me what you are capable of (sports)" and "try to beat us (politics)" these last meaning can also apply for sports or not?

    If I am missing some meanings, please let me know.

    Thanks in advance,
    Antonio.
     
  7. elroy

    elroy Motley mod

    Chicago, IL
    American English, Palestinian Arabic
    Yes, "bring it on" pretty much means "show me what you've got."

    Some examples that might help make the picture clearer:

    -Wanna play chess?
    -Nah, I don't really feel like it.
    -What's the matter? Are you afraid I'm gonna beat you?
    -Dream on! Let's go then - bring it on!

    -I've got several counterarguments that could defeat your argument.
    -Let's hear them - bring it on.
     
  8. jacinta Senior Member

    California
    USA English
    Just one thing here, elroy..."give it in" isn't right. That's a whole 'nother story (give in)!!
     
  9. Antonio Senior Member

    Monterrey
    Mexico/Spanish
    How can I use the word bring it on, for instance in politics, can you make a sentence and the meaning to understand better the context. Basically I can use this word in sports, daily routine (in case of a fight) and in a political field too.

    If I am missing some other fleld, please let me know.

    Thanks in advance,
    Antonio.
     
  10. elroy

    elroy Motley mod

    Chicago, IL
    American English, Palestinian Arabic
    The phrase "give in" can be both transitive and intransitive. When transitive, (I gave something in), it can be a substitute for "turn in." When intransitive, (I gave in), it means "to submit, to yield."

    Here is what www.dictionary.com says:

    give in
    1. To hand in; submit: She gave in her report.
    2. To cease opposition; yield.

    Our very own www.wordreference.com says the same thing:

    give in
    verb [adverb(ial)]
    1 [intransitive] to yield; admit defeat
    2 [transitive] to submit or deliver (a document)

    I know that the more common expression would be "turn in" but "give in" - with an object - is certainly correct.
     
  11. jacinta Senior Member

    California
    USA English
    The world is full of differences. I should have chosen my words better and not said "it is wrong". I am saying that I have never heard it used in this context. And there you go, right there in the ol' dictionary and everything.
     
  12. elroy

    elroy Motley mod

    Chicago, IL
    American English, Palestinian Arabic
    Understood. The world is indeed full of differences! :)
     
  13. David Senior Member

    Antonio--here's two political examples, with the sense of challenge, or dare:

    "My opponent says he has information that will destroy my candidacy. I say, 'Bring it on!' I have nothing to hide!"

    OR

    "The rebels say they have a new weapon that will bring our army to its knees. Bring it on! We can take anything they throw at us, and then some!"

    In a less bellicose sense, it means "to present." El maestro de ceremonias says, "I am now going to bring on Ms. Daphne Sweetfeet, who will perform her new ballet, Daffodils and Devils... She's a little shy, so let's bring her on with a nice round of applause."
     

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