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Bueno, tenemos que ... / A ver, tenemos que

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by rhythmbug, Apr 27, 2007.

  1. rhythmbug New Member

    London, UK
    Australia - English
    I stumbled across this site searching for a translation of the phrase "A ver". So hi everyone.
    I heard alot of people saying it in bolivia but I'm not entirely sure the correct context to use it (I forgot to ask when I was there).
    It seemed to be a rough synonym of "Bueno," as in "well, blah blah blah".

    Entonces, puedo decir algo como esto? -

    Julio - Quieres salir esta tarde con las chicas a la playa?
    Pedro - A VER, primero tenemos que visitar al agencia de turismo antes de podemos hacer otros planes.
     
  2. Blixa Senior Member

    Spanish, MX
    a ver= veamos, veré

    Hope it helps!
     
  3. rhythmbug New Member

    London, UK
    Australia - English
    I see (pardon the pun). Can you put it into the start of a sentence, like I did? Porque los bolivianos siempre lo decian asi.

    gracias!
     
  4. lapachis8 Senior Member

    El Defectuoso
    Mexico-Spanish
    saludos
     
  5. rhythmbug New Member

    London, UK
    Australia - English
    haha I knew someone would trip up my crappy grammar! but thanks I need it!
     
  6. Bilma Senior Member

    USA
    Spanish Mexico
     
  7. lapachis8 Senior Member

    El Defectuoso
    Mexico-Spanish
    Sorry about that one.
    It was not about you, but about people who come to the forum and get mixed up or confused gramatically.
    I also get corrected when I write in English which is alright by me.
    cheers
     
  8. rhythmbug New Member

    London, UK
    Australia - English
    believe me I appreciate it. I found when speaking the language in south america, not many people corrected me; probably out of manners. I only started learning spanish 6 months ago.

    cheers guys
     
  9. A ver = Let's see, or let me see now, or something along those lines in English. Many other words, in Spanish and English, are used in place of these phrases without having the same literal meaning but serving a roughly equivalent purpose of giving pause for consideration. That's why you might see "bueno" in Spanish or "okay" in English.
     
  10. rhythmbug New Member

    London, UK
    Australia - English
    Thanks Paul. So can I assume my use of the phrase in the sentence above is correct, mas o menos?
     
  11. rhythmbug New Member

    London, UK
    Australia - English
    I discovered there actually is an english word "aver".

    Definition
    1. To assert the truth of, to affirm with confidence; to declare in a positive manner.
      • 1819 CE: Percy Shelley, Peter Bell the Third The Devil, I safely can aver, / Has neither hoof, nor tail, nor sting.
    2. To avouch, prove, or verify; to offer to verify.
    3. To justify.
    Is that just a coincidence? Because it seems like a very similar meaning.
    Someone, anyone??
     
  12. Bilma Senior Member

    USA
    Spanish Mexico
    I think it is just a coincidence. Not the same meaning.
     
  13. lapachis8 Senior Member

    El Defectuoso
    Mexico-Spanish
    Hi,
    Check this link and the ethymology.
    As Bilma said it is a coincidence. Aver is derived from French, derived from Latin, meaning "to make true".

    You can use:
    A ver,
    Bueno,
    Veamos,
    Mmmhh,

    Perhaps it has something to do with Texas Avery because his eyes were big?
    Or maybe with legal jargon because lawyers can be nosy? :rolleyes:
    cheers
     
  14. evitap Senior Member

    Spanish-Colombia
    Rythmbug: Yes, it's fine. It's like saying: Let me see, first we have to go to the travel agency... etc.
     
  15. almita New Member

    Mexico Español
    In Latinamerica "a ver" at the beggining of a sentence can also be used with some of the following purposes:

    1. To emphasize: ¡A ver, niños, pongan atención!
    2. To clarify something: A ver, ¿porqué no quieres ir?

    Saludos!!!
     
  16. Filis Cañí Senior Member

    The hills
    Triana, caló
    Well and let's see are used in the same way, but that doesn't mean that they mean the same.
     
  17. Fernita

    Fernita Moderada-mente

    Buenos Aires-Argentina
    castellano de Argentina.
    En Argentina, usamos "a ver" para no contestar inmediatamente.

    "A ver" como diciendo "Pensemos o déjame pensar"

    Ejemplo:

    - ¿Tienes tiempo para tomar otro café?
    - A ver, creo que sí/no.

    Espero que te sirva de ayuda.
    Saludos :)
     
  18. rhythmbug New Member

    London, UK
    Australia - English
    Muchas gracias por todos sus respuestas, lo comprendo bien ahora :thumbsup:
     
  19. pitivw Senior Member

    Galicia
    Spain, Spanish
    I think you can choose the use "a ver" in all situations where a doubt exists, so you dont know what it´ll be happenned:

    ¿Que será de las manzanas si no las comemos?
    Vamos a ver (que pasa). (going to see)

    So I think if you are using " a ver" you´re always proposing (emphasizing) a uncertainty about a situation

    ¿Qué será de las manzanas si no las comemos?
    ¡A ver, yo qué sé!

    so it depends which country you are people tend to use more or less "a ver" as turn of phrase, but it´ll always represent a doubt
     
  20. k-in-sc

    k-in-sc Senior Member

    I remember a guy on a Mexican talk show was being booed by the audience and he yelled it at them over and over, like ''Hold on! Just give me a chance (to talk)!" Anybody else know about it being used like that?
     
  21. pitivw Senior Member

    Galicia
    Spain, Spanish
    Yes. perhaps people were booing (?): ¡A ver! ¡A ver si acabas!
    ¡A ver si te vas de una vez!
    so they are applying a doubt whether he will finish the performance, in this case with anger.

    excuse me sintaxis
     
  22. Elvira31 New Member

    Seville (Spain)
    Spain Spanish
    I think both have the same meaning, just sound different.
    So, if you are a little bit more direct you'll say: - A ver,...
    If you like it smoother, you'll say: - Bueno,...

    I think there's just a phonetic difference!
    ;)
     

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