by the end of the week vs. by the weekend

Discussion in 'English Only' started by kaze_hikaru, May 3, 2013.

  1. kaze_hikaru Senior Member

    Korean
    by the end of the week
    by the weekend

    Are those the same things?

    e.g. This piece of junk should be thrown away by the end of the week/by the weekend
     
  2. ewie

    ewie Senior Member

    This septic isle!
    NW Englandish English
    No. By the end of the week means 'before midnight on Sunday'. By the weekend generally means 'before midnight on Friday', i.e. before the weekend.
     
  3. Myridon

    Myridon Senior Member

    Texas
    English - US
    For some people, Sunday is the first day not the last day. If you're at work, "by the end of the week" generally means "before 5:00 pm on Friday" (depending on how the hours, days, and weeks are determined where you work).
     
  4. kaze_hikaru Senior Member

    Korean
    according to ewie, by the end of the weekend means 'before midnight on Friday'. right?
    but Myridon said by the end of the week means 'before 5:00 pm on Friday'...
    but by the end of the weekend and by the end of the week are different.
    I'm so confused... I can't understand ! do they depend on the situation? and society?!
     
  5. lucas-sp Senior Member

    English - Californian
    The problem is that we have a lot of different things called "weeks" - and people in different places, cultures, and contexts will calculate the "week" starting and ending on different days.

    Myridon thinks of the "week" as "the work week"/"the business week." If my boss said "Get those papers to me by the end of the week!" I would think he meant "before leaving on Friday."

    For ewie, the "week" is a seven-day period beginning on Monday and ending on Sunday. This is the week of many Christians, and since English was historically influenced by Christian culture, that's what "the week" means to a lot of people.

    But, for Jews, just to take a random example, the week is counted as beginning on Sunday (or, perhaps more technically, as beginning at sundown on Saturday).

    In the real world, you'll probably have some sort of context that will help you understand what definition of "week" is being used.
     
  6. RM1(SS)

    RM1(SS) Senior Member

    Connecticut
    English - US (Midwest)
    Whereas according to the calendar hanging on my wall, a week is a seven-day period beginning on Sunday and ending on Saturday, so to me "by the end of the week" would mean no later than 2400 Saturday. I think most Americans, if they were not referring to a "work week" (Monday through Friday), would think of this as a week, as well.
     
  7. kaze_hikaru Senior Member

    Korean
    Thank you for your explanation.
    Do you think I could ask one more question?
    ewie is generally right in this sentence I made(in usa)?

    (This piece of junk should be thrown away by the end of the week/by the weekend)
    by the end of week=by Sunday
    by the weekned=by Friday ??
     
  8. valdemar Senior Member

    Mexico
    Español mexicano
    Saying 'by the end of the week' takes me to the point when my week is finished. Saying 'by the weekend' takes me to any point in the period of time saturday-sunday (probably from friday afternoon) because I'm a student. As a student my week is made up of 5 days, from monday to friday, so the end of the week for me is friday, when my last class at school actually finishes. For someone who is working at a company the end of the week might be on saturday afternoon, for example. All depends on the situation. Speaking about a weekend it's always a period of time (end of the week-begining of the week, for example friday afternoon-sunday night).


    This piece of junk should be throw away by the end of the week= when my week is finished or before.
    This piece of junk should be throw away by the weekend= at some point of the weekend, after the week is finished, or before.
     

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