Cadenas de radio y televisión

Discussion in 'Cultural Discussions' started by Gustavoang, Oct 31, 2005.

  1. Gustavoang Senior Member

    Venezuela / Castilian
    Hola a todos.

    En Venezuela cuando los gobiernos han querido transmitir alguna información que consideran que debe ser conocida por la mayoría de la población, hacen una "Cadena nacional de radio y televisión", esto consiste en que en todas las emisoras de radio y estaciones de televisión deben transmitir, en conjunto y al mismo tiempo, el mensaje que se diga que se tiene que transmitir.

    Alguien vió la película Armagedon? En caso de que la hayas visto, te acuerdas de cuando el presidente de EEUU se comunicó por TV y radio a su población y estos medios de comunicación transmitieron el mensaje al mismo tiempo? Eso es que nosotros llamamos cadena de radio y televisión.

    Muchos sólo suelen decir "cadena", en lugar de "cadena de radio y televisión".

    Ahora, lo que quisiera saber es: Cómo le llaman a esto en los demás países? Incluso en países donde no se habla el español.

    Gracias por adelantado!

    Saludos!
     
  2. BasedowLives

    BasedowLives Senior Member

    uSa
    if it's an emergency

    "This is a transmission of the emergency broadcast system:" or something like that, i think. I've personally never seen it, but they test it all the time.
     
  3. Venezuelan_sweetie

    Venezuelan_sweetie Senior Member

    La Jerusalén de los Suramericanos.
    Venezuela --> Spanish -or something alik
    Hey, this is interesting. I've always made myself the same question...

    Does anybody have another way to say it?
    .
    .
    .

    PS: This is Gustavoang's detailed definition of what a "cadena" is...
    .
    .
     
  4. jazyk Senior Member

    Brno, Česká republika
    Brazílie, portugalština
    Tenemos la misma cosa en Brasil y la llamamos Transmissão em Cadeia Nacional "Transmisión en Cadena Nacional".
     
  5. fenixpollo

    fenixpollo Mod, I say, Moderator

    Arizona
    American English
  6. Venezuelan_sweetie

    Venezuelan_sweetie Senior Member

    La Jerusalén de los Suramericanos.
    Venezuela --> Spanish -or something alik
    I'll check out those links, fenixpollo. (I knew you wouldn't let me down... :p)

    Thanks a lot!

    PS: Thread still open to other comments... ;)
     
  7. Bilma Senior Member

    USA
    Spanish Mexico
    In Mexico we call it Transmisión en cadena nacional. If I remember correctly it is used only when the president talks to the nation.
     
  8. Venezuelan_sweetie

    Venezuelan_sweetie Senior Member

    La Jerusalén de los Suramericanos.
    Venezuela --> Spanish -or something alik
    Exactly, Bilma. That is what I am talking about: an Official nationwide broadcast, generally, the President -or an Official spokesman- speaking.

    I've just checked both links and, though I found the first one quite interesting (I think I'll post something there in a while... ;) ), none of them is related to my original question.

    I'm trying to find out what name you give to those simultaneous TV and radio broadcasts one eventually comes up with, mainly in emergency situations (in my country, they're not eventual -nor emergency related- at all, they're a constant pain in the... well, you get it). I'm especially interested in English speaking countries. Any ideas?
     
  9. fenixpollo

    fenixpollo Mod, I say, Moderator

    Arizona
    American English
    In the US, the government does not interrupt programming for political reasons, so we don't have a name for what gustavo is describing.

    Local governments can interrupt programming for public safety emergencies, and the system that basedow mentioned (the Emergency Broadcast System) is a national network that exists for that purpose.
     
  10. Venezuelan_sweetie

    Venezuelan_sweetie Senior Member

    La Jerusalén de los Suramericanos.
    Venezuela --> Spanish -or something alik
    Interesting. And, if that system is broadcasting some emergency news, how do you call that transmission? Maybe there is no word for it, as you say. Anyway, let me try to explain myself a bit further. Let's set the scene:

    You're sitting on your favourite couch, watching TV and having popcorns (or beers, if you prefer), and suddenly, programming is interrupted in order to transmit whatever emergency news. Your friend (any of your choice) walks into the room and ask: "what is it on TV?", and you say: "Oh, it's a XXX, the EBS is broadcasting that flood in YYY State".

    My interest is in what that XXX would be called... All languages are welcome (I'm dying curious over how to say it in English and French, though...)
     
  11. fenixpollo

    fenixpollo Mod, I say, Moderator

    Arizona
    American English
    I might say "The river is flooding and an emergency broadcast came on" or "It's the emergency broadcast system, telling us that the river is flooding." If a government official interrupted programming for some national emergency or something, it might be called an emergency address by the president, or something like that.
     
  12. Venezuelan_sweetie

    Venezuelan_sweetie Senior Member

    La Jerusalén de los Suramericanos.
    Venezuela --> Spanish -or something alik
    Thank you, fenixpollo. Now it is absolutelly clear to me, I promise I won't ask you again ;)

    And, what about other English speaking countries? What about countries where languages other than English are spoken, say, France, Russia, Japan...?

    Any member from those places around?
     
  13. jazyk Senior Member

    Brno, Česká republika
    Brazílie, portugalština
    I get it now! In Brazil it's called plantão da Globo or notícias de última hora (if I'm not delusional).
     
  14. Venezuelan_sweetie

    Venezuelan_sweetie Senior Member

    La Jerusalén de los Suramericanos.
    Venezuela --> Spanish -or something alik
    Actually, your first post was accurate. I wanted equivalents to "Transmisión en Cadena Nacional" (literally, "National "chain" broadcast").

    It's just that, as fenix was gently explaining to me (sometimes I get as enquiring as a toddler :p ), they don't have such things in the US. If I'm getting it straight, the government doesn't interrupt programming (right, fp? ;) ); they only get "noticias de última hora" (breaking news, or last minute news) whenever there's an emergency.

    PS: Thanks for the feedback, jazyk
     
  15. Venezuelan_sweetie

    Venezuelan_sweetie Senior Member

    La Jerusalén de los Suramericanos.
    Venezuela --> Spanish -or something alik
    Ow! I just noticed the first post is in Spanish... no wonder why only Spanish speaking members have replied :eek:

    I'll translate it into English in a few minutes for everybody's interest... ;)
     
  16. Venezuelan_sweetie

    Venezuelan_sweetie Senior Member

    La Jerusalén de los Suramericanos.
    Venezuela --> Spanish -or something alik
    Alright, lunch time is over. Now let's see what I can do...

    Very poor, I know... It's the best I could do, I always end up like this in the Cultural Forum... :eek:
     
  17. invictaspirit Senior Member

    Kent, SE England
    English English
    In the UK there is no regular interuption to normal programming across multiple networks by the state. (And I think I can speak for many of us when I see that if there were, we would see it as a bad thing.)

    Here we have a mixture of public (but not state) television and many commercial networks. No-one has control over all of them. In dire emergencies, such as nuclear attack or invasion, I believe plans exist for all-channel broadcasts by the civil emergency authorities, but that is all.

    The only thing slightly like what you describe in Venezuela is when, at moments of very serious news (perhaps the death of the Queen or similar...this happened when Princess Diana died) the different BBC radio and TV networks (there are several of each) 'collapse' into one for TV and one for radio. But there are still many other non-BBC channels and radio stations that are not subject to this convention. It's an internal BBC thing.
     
  18. Chaska Ñawi

    Chaska Ñawi modus borealis

    an old Ontario farmhouse
    Canadian English
    Canadians also call it the Emergency Broadcast System.

    In Canada and the States, there is also something called an Amber Alert, named after an abducted child named Amber. She was murdered before she was found.

    When a child is abducted and believed to be in danger, an Amber Alert is issued. A description of the child, the abductor and the abductor's vehicle, or any other relevant information, is disseminated through radio and television stations, highway signs, lottery terminals, in-store television programs, everything.

    I don't know the statistics, but some children were certainly saved by the alert - in one case, when the abductor saw a description of his car on the highway overpass, he dropped the child off at the next block.
     
  19. mirx Senior Member

    Español
    Hi sweetie Venezuelan


    In México we simply say "Cadena Nacional", a lo que tu llams Cadena Nacional de Telivisión y Radio, en México es un sindicato de los trabajadores de la televisión y la radio. Aparte hay un canal exclusivo del gobierno de la República (normalmente con imagen congelada) que transmite todo el día todos los días, cuando pasa algo muy importante pero ajeno a asuntos del gobierno, por ejemplo las visitas del Papa, los destejos del 12 de Diciembre, etc, entonces las cadenas televisoras se unen en una sola y practicamente se hace "Cadeba Nacional".

    Creo que esto último es algo similar a lo que pasa en Estados Unidos, Canada y el Reino Unido, no es un decreto gubernamental pero las empresas de comunicación deciden que si están anunciando lo mismo entonces no tiene caso pelearse por los televidentes.

    En México aparte de la "Cadena Nacional", tenemos algo que se llama "La hora Nacional" si mal no recuerdo la pasan los domingos en la noche en todas las estaciones de la República y termina con el Himno Nacional, que por decreto se toca en todas las difusaras diariamente a las doce de la noche.
     
  20. mirx Senior Member

    Español
    Hi sweetie Venezuelan


    In México we simply say "Cadena Nacional", a lo que tu llams Cadena Nacional de Telivisión y Radio, en México es un sindicato de los trabajadores de la televisión y la radio. Aparte hay un canal exclusivo del gobierno de la República (normalmente con imagen congelada) que transmite todo el día todos los días, cuando pasa algo muy importante pero ajeno a asuntos del gobierno, por ejemplo las visitas del Papa, los destejos del 12 de Diciembre, etc, entonces las cadenas televisoras se unen en una sola y practicamente se hace "Cadena Nacional".

    Creo que esto último es algo similar a lo que pasa en Estados Unidos, Canada y el Reino Unido, no es un decreto gubernamental pero las empresas de comunicación deciden que si están anunciando lo mismo entonces no tiene caso pelearse por los televidentes.

    En México aparte de la "Cadena Nacional", tenemos algo que se llama "La hora Nacional" si mal no recuerdo la pasan los domingos en la noche en todas las estaciones de la República y termina con el Himno Nacional, que por decreto se toca en todas las difusaras diariamente a las doce de la noche. "La hora Nacional" es un programa cultural, que trata de rescatar las raíces de la cultura Mexicana. y puede ser interrumpida cuando hay "Cadena Nacional".
     
  21. tvdxer Senior Member

    Minnesota, U.S.A.
    Minnesota, U.S.A. - English
    I am not aware of any name equivalent to what the first poster described. When the president has a state of the union address, most of the major terrestrial networks (ABC, NBC, CBS, etc.) will carry it, but I am not sure if they really are obliged to. Local emergency information is sent over local affiliates of these networks by the "Emergency Broadcast System

    No conozco de ningun termino igual del que ha descrito el primero posteador. Cuando el presidente da su conferencia "State of the Union" (Estado del Union), la mayoria de los mayores redes nacionales la difunde, pero no se si DEBEN. Los afiliados de estos redes transmiten advertencias de emergencias locales (e.g. tornados, inundacion, etc.)
     

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