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capitalization at beginning of mid-sentence quote

Discussion in 'English Only' started by rubes1, Aug 8, 2007.

  1. rubes1 Senior Member

    Israel
    United States, English
    What is the rule when you have a quote mid-sentence that is the beginning of a sentence? Do you capitalize? Thanks!

    He promised that “in course of time all these angularities will vanish,” and further thatYou may belong to any religion...”

    OR

    He promised that “in course of time all these angularities will vanish,” and further that
    “[y]ou may belong to any religion...”

     
  2. JeffJo Senior Member

    USA
    USA, English
    When something is quoted it should be given in its exact original form, including capitalization. So yes, capitalize the quote where the original is capitalized.
     
  3. river Senior Member

    U.S. English
    Partial quotes - and full quotes that continue a thought already begun in the sentence - should not start with caps unless the first word is a proper noun: Despite the rain, the Mayor said, "it was a very good day."

    "When a quote follows the subordinating conjunction that do not capitalize the first word or set the quote off with a comma."

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  4. JeffJo Senior Member

    USA
    USA, English
    As we see :) you'll encounter different style guidelines on this.

    The problem with not capitalizing the first word of a quoted sentence is that people may think it's a partial quote with the ellipsis omitted. It's better to capitalize the first word of the quoted sentence, to avoid that possible misunderstanding.

    The quote from the Mayor, without the capital, makes it appear that only a partial sentence is being quoted.

    It's always best to be absolutely exact to the original material, as much as possible. An internal capital won't bother anybody, when quotation marks are used, because people are so accustomed to seeing that style in fictional dialogue.
     

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