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catching / picking barnacles

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by Argoss, Jan 12, 2010.

  1. Argoss Senior Member

    Spanish
    Hello, everybody,
    I need some help here: I'm trying to translate the sentence "Coger percebes es muy peligroso" into English and I don't know if I should use the verb catch or pick in this contxt:
    "Catching/ picking barnacles is very dangerous".
    Thank you!
     
  2. danielfranco

    danielfranco Senior Member

    Is it dangerous because you have to dive and risk the waves smashing you to a pulp against the rocks? In that case I would mention the actual act of diving:

    "Diving for barnacles is very dangerous."
     
  3. spodulike

    spodulike Senior Member

    Brighton, England
    English - England
    To catch implies a chase. The mental picture is that the barnacles are running away and the man is running after them! Either that or he has set a trap for them and they are falling into it.

    To pick usually implies a crop. Is the man going to eat them?

    Another possibility is "gathering" as in this article http://www.clovegarden.com/ingred/seabarn.html
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2010
  4. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    You see barnacles on many rocky stretches of the UK shoreline. You don't need to dive to get at these particular barnacles.

    I would say, "Collecting barnacles is dangerous" or "Picking barnacles off the rocks is dangerous." I agree with spodulike that "gathering" is another possibility.

    I would not say, "Picking barnacles is dangerous." Nor would I say, "Catching barnacles is dangerous", for the reason set out by spodulike.
     
  5. Argoss Senior Member

    Spanish
    Thank you all so much for your help!! I'll use the options you've suggested.
    By the way, Spodulike, I'm still laughing at what you said about the barnacles running away and the man trying to catch them!:)
     
  6. cirrus

    cirrus Senior Member

    Warwick
    UK English
    Presumably the danger is that as filter feeders they can easily become contaminated?
     
  7. mijoch Senior Member

    British English
    I like "to collect".

    Also used as a, perhaps more technical term, is "to harvest barnacles".

    M.

    QUOTE---".....to see him swimming in underwater caves to harvest barnacles."
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2010
  8. cirrus

    cirrus Senior Member

    Warwick
    UK English
    I wonder where the quote's from. Barnacles live in the intertidal zone. You only have to wait until the tide goes out to pick them.
     
  9. mijoch Senior Member

    British English
    Hi cirrus.

    I'm no expert on barnacles/percebes. Wikipedia--barnacles are encrusters, attaching themselves to a hard substrate---rocks, boat bottoms, etc. I've seen the term "intertidal". Those are the easy ones, but they're still attached to rocks, and not that easy to pick. In Galicia, the "perceberos" jump into the waves, with a knife, and cut/pry the "percebes" off the rocks. And dangerous it is.

    I just can't find my quote now, but if you google---harvesting barnacles----you'll find lots of stuff.

    The site---gooseneck barnacle fishery revived----is interesting.

    M.
     
  10. spodulike

    spodulike Senior Member

    Brighton, England
    English - England
    With regard to the danger, the link I gave above, says the following ...

    Gathering edible barnacles is difficult and dangerous. Every year people die gathering them along the Iberian peninsula in Europe and the Pacific Northwest coast of North America.
     
  11. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    Presumably the danger is the incoming tide.
     
  12. mijoch Senior Member

    British English
    That's a good point--sound.

    But, if it were as easy as simply "harvest/gather/pick" when the tide's out: why do the "perceberos" jump into those waves, and occasionally one them dies?

    I see this on the telly here---often.

    M.
     
  13. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    Tienes razón, mijoch. Esto no lo sabía.
     

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