1. kuikailer

    kuikailer Senior Member

    Sevilla
    Español - España
    Hola personas:

    Frase hecha: "Cazador cazado"

    Me atrevo con "Hunter hunted" pero me da en la nariz que no...

    Gracias
     
  2. Txiri

    Txiri Senior Member

    USA English
    I understand what you're asking. No, not "hunter hunted", but we get the idea perfectly well. Maybe we say, "and the hunter is the hunted" or "... becomes the hunted."

    The predator becomes the prey
     
  3. bluepolaris

    bluepolaris Senior Member

    Corunna, Spain
    Spanish-Spain
    Hola,

    Pues no andas desencaminado, "the hunter becomes the hunted".
     
  4. gengo

    gengo Senior Member

    I agree with the above suggestions, but another possibility is "to turn the tables on someone." There are other possibilities, but it all depends on the exact context.
     
  5. kuikailer

    kuikailer Senior Member

    Sevilla
    Español - España
    Gracias por vuestras respuestas.

    @gengo, no hay más contexto que el comentario jocoso y sarcástico a un fotógrafo cazado por otro 'paparazzi' Creo que la idea que propones se aleja semánticamente de la idea de "cazador cazado" si pones algún ejemplo, podríamos concretar más.
     
  6. edictzero Senior Member

    English - USA
    so "cazador cazado" is a common phrase I can use and be understood?

    Would I just say "Cazador casado" when the situation comes up, or would I say Ya es un cazador cazado?
     
  7. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    We sometimes say "Biter bitten" in this sort of situation.
     
  8. kuikailer

    kuikailer Senior Member

    Sevilla
    Español - España
    @edictzero Exacto. Si por ejemplo, un fotógrafo es fotografiado, un profesor recibe clases o un ladrón roba a otro ladrón (además de 100 años de perdón) son casos de "cazadores cazados"

    The sentence may vary depending on situations but, like any other saying, the sentence usually remains the same.

    @sound shift Thanks... sounds quite similar
     
  9. gengo

    gengo Senior Member

    My suggestion would fit perfectly in that case.

    "The tables were turned on celebrity photographer John Doe when paparazzi recently caught him dining with his mistress."

    By the way, paparazzi is plural in Italian, so the strictly correct way to say what you did is "por otro paparazzo." But maybe that is ignored in Spanish.
     
  10. kuikailer

    kuikailer Senior Member

    Sevilla
    Español - España
    Absolutely, Gengo, I'm supposed to know that though, but I was thinking in Spanish and used it as such.

    Any other foreign language is mistreated in Spain in general. It's normal to listen on Tv "Johnny Depp" as /dʒɑ:ni di: p/ or even "paparazzi" as for singular.
    Don't you ever ask for a White Label /waɪt leibl/ whisky but a /wait la:bel/ whisky instead.... and so on.

    On the other hand, "to turn the tables on" means exactly the same thing then, but needs a further explanation, so it's more literary.
     
  11. Txiri

    Txiri Senior Member

    USA English
    Don't be too hard on yourselves. Half our populace thinks "Spanish" people live in Mexico. Half don't read well, much less pronounce any word originating in another language, much less our own.
     
  12. floresta Senior Member

    Castellano
    Tenés que buscar la expresión en inglés para: se le dió vuelta la tortilla.
     
  13. gengo

    gengo Senior Member

    I agree with Txiri; foreign loan words are probably abused in every language on Earth. Although pasta names such as spaghetti, fettucine, and lasagne are all plural in Italian, they are treated as singular in English. And the city of Vallejo near where I live is pronounced as Valejo. So Spaniards are not unusual in this respect.
     
  14. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    Esto en inglés es "Now the boot is on the other foot."
     
  15. kuikailer

    kuikailer Senior Member

    Sevilla
    Español - España
    I understand that loans tend to be adapted to the native language of the speaker, as in "Vallejo" (probably you also make a difference btw. /v/ & /b/ when there's no difference in Spanish at all) but I don't think it's the same happening as in "Johnny Depp"

    In that case, the point is that we've been told about general rules in English such as "-ee-" uttered as /i:/ and maybe we've learnt "deep" in any reading so: Depp --> deep. And I am cool because I know the rule.

    Another case, very interesting one is "Michael J. Fox" where Michael & Fox are pronounced approximately as in English but "J." is said in Spanish: "jota" so:
    /maikl xota foks/ . The reason: people still confuse "J" & "G" pronunciation.

    "Tom Cruise" I haven't EVER heard any Spaniard saying the right way, for us is /krui:s/

    Well, it wasn't the the subject of this post... but concerning my culture, I think that there are some "solutions" to the problem that have not been taken into account like the TV as a linguistic model.
     
  16. bluepolaris

    bluepolaris Senior Member

    Corunna, Spain
    Spanish-Spain
    Hi,

    Maybe "the shot backfired" could work here as well....
     
  17. kuikailer

    kuikailer Senior Member

    Sevilla
    Español - España
    Sorry, didn't mean it but I've already read this: http://twurl.nl/tgbmc4 Now it's even better:

    (first question from the reporter to the Tv News presenter on LaSexta)
    -¿Te persiguen ya los paparazzies o aún vas tranquila por la vida?

    Doesn't it really hurt you somehow?
     
  18. Arrius

    Arrius Senior Member

    Spain
    English, UK
    In fact. one says the biter bit, even though bitten is the only correct past participle in modern English. An analogy to this would be writ large instead of written.

    My suggestion: He's gettting a taste of his own medicine.
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2009

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