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  1. Blue Moon Colorado Junior Member

    Denver, Colorado
    English, U.S.A.
    For translation of:
    "I'm going to mow the lawn"
    which of the following will be most easily understood?

    1) Voy a cortar el cesped.
    o
    2) Voy a cortar la grama.

    (Sorry, with my computer, I can't use the correct accent marks.)

    Are "cesped" and "grama" both correct translations for lawn? Or, is there some slight variation in the meaning of the two words? I originally was taught to use "grama", but I've been hearing quite a few people use "cesped" recently, and finally had to look it up.

    Gracias.
     
  2. ERASMO_GALENO Senior Member

    Lima limón
    Perú, Español
    Hi,

    Around here we would understand both, but maybe a more widely understood term would be césped.

    Regards,
     
  3. María Madrid

    María Madrid Senior Member

    Madrid, Spain
    Spanish Spain
    If you say grama, people in Spain wouldn't know what you're talking about. We say césped.

    I had to look up grama and according to RAE's dictionary it's used only in some American countries. Saludos, :)

    grama.
    (Del lat. gramĭna, pl. de gramen).

    1. f. Planta medicinal de la familia de las Gramíneas, con el tallo cilíndrico y rastrero, que echa raicillas por los nudos. Tiene hojas cortas, planas y agudas, y flores en espigas filiformes que salen en número de tres o de cinco en la extremidad de las cañitas de dos decímetros de largo.
    2. f. Ec., Hond., Pan., Perú y P. Rico. césped (hierba menuda).

    Real Academia Española © Todos los derechos reservados
     
  4. Fantasmagórico

    Fantasmagórico Senior Member

    Montevideo, Uruguay
    Uruguayan Spanish
    “Césped” is the most formal term, and the most widely understood, as was already said.
    In informal contexts… it all depends on your audience: “césped” is still used in some countries, “grama” in others… and even “pasto” in others (mine included).

    I would add to this list: Venezuela
     
  5. María Madrid

    María Madrid Senior Member

    Madrid, Spain
    Spanish Spain
    In Spain pasto refers to grass growing wild in the fields, the kind cows eat..
    Then the Academy in Venezuela should ask RAE to include it's also used there! Saludos, :)
     
  6. Ayutuxtepeque

    Ayutuxtepeque Moderador

    San Salvador, El Salvador
    Español salvadoreño
    In El Salvador we also say "grama" for lawn. "Césped" is not used very often, but the people understand it.
     
  7. Fantasmagórico

    Fantasmagórico Senior Member

    Montevideo, Uruguay
    Uruguayan Spanish
    Not so here. We say “cortar el pasto” for mowing the garden. And I think we usually (but not always) save the more formal term “césped” for parks and stadiums.:)
    And "grama" is completely unknown in my country.
     
  8. Viniaki Senior Member

    Rialto, California
    U.S.A. Spanish
    Yo he oído a muchas personas del norte de México decir zacate, aunque tengo entendido que zacate tambien es lo que come el ganado.
     
  9. Kibramoa

    Kibramoa Senior Member

    Deep South, U.S.A.
    Spanish - MX
    In México you would say "cortar el pasto". Césped is what you would read on a sign on a park. I had never heard "grama" until I meet people from El Salvador. In this case think of your audience. Who is going to read the document? Which word would be understood by this particular audience? :)
     
  10. Blue Moon Colorado Junior Member

    Denver, Colorado
    English, U.S.A.
    Muchas gracias a todos por toda la informacion de este asunto. Estoy de acuerdo que en Venezuela casi siempre dicen "grama" cuando estan hablando del pasto en un jardin. Cuando estuve estudiando en Venezuela, me dijeron que "grama" era la palabra que debo usar.

    Gracias otra vez - Blue Moon
     
  11. silvester

    silvester Senior Member

    USA
    Mexico, spanish
    Hello,
    We use zacate or pasto, but mostly zacate. At least that's what my parents have always called it.
     
  12. Harmattan Senior Member

    Madrid
    Spanish
    Coincido en que en España se usaría cesped, pero en algunas zonas sí se usa 'grama'. Eso sí: No como sinónimo de cesped sino refiriéndose a esa hierba que parece cesped pero que vista de cerca se ve que no lo es (o sea: Que es grama, más resistente que el cesped verdadero).

    Yo lo he oido en Andalucía (Algeciras, por concretar).
     
  13. María Madrid

    María Madrid Senior Member

    Madrid, Spain
    Spanish Spain
    Interesante Harmattan. Yo jamás lo había oido. Gracias por el dato. Saludos, :)
     
  14. Ayutuxtepeque

    Ayutuxtepeque Moderador

    San Salvador, El Salvador
    Español salvadoreño
    En El Salvador, el término "pasto" lo utilizamos de manera parecida a como lo menciona María Madrid, es decir, como el zacate que crece en las praderas, en los potreros, etc., y que es utilizado para alimentar al ganado.

    Nuevamente, saludos.
     
  15. Bilma Senior Member

    USA
    Spanish Mexico
    Where are you from?:)
     
  16. Giloz New Member

    USA English/Spanish
    Ok, I'm including my two cents worth in here.
    This is based on my personal knowledge and my Mexican American Heritage:
    Grama is a type of grass, it is supposed to be a "bad type of grass" for ornamental purposes. In central Mexico grows only during the raining season, and it is used to feed cattle. In some places is considered an invasive species for some ornamental purposes. (Here is a great article about it: http://www.blueplanetbiomes.org/blue_grama-grass.htm )
    In certain regions of the world such as central and south America they call grama what here in the States we know as lawn.
    Now, mowing the lawn can be translated in to spanish in many forms, but the essence of translating is getting the idea across. In this case we have to think of our cultural audience.
    Here are the most commonly used forms.
    Cortar el césped.
    Cortar el pasto.
    Cortar el zacate.
    Recortar la grama.
    And the list goes on.
    P. S. (P. D.)
    As far as I know, in Mexico spanish is not the official language, now a days they call it "La Lengua Nacional" and / or "Lengua Nacional" based on the thousand of words that were taken in to spanish from the pre-spanish invasion cultures such as the Aztec, Mayan, Zapotec, Nahuatl and many more.
    I hope I helped.
     
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2009

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