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C'est plus fort que moi

Discussion in 'French-English Vocabulary / Vocabulaire Français-Anglais' started by jhemono, Dec 2, 2006.

  1. jhemono New Member

    Hello,
    How do you translate "C'est plus fort que moi." ?
    I asked my english teacher, she said it was "It's more than (what) I can do." but she said she actually don't know what it means in French and I have'nt had the time to explain her.
    Thank you
     
  2. RocketGirl

    RocketGirl Senior Member

    Australia
    Canada, English
    Depending on the context: It's bigger/stronger/more powerful than I am / than me
     
  3. geve

    geve Senior Member

    France, Paris
    France, French
    The first thing that comes to mind is I can't help it - but some context would definitely help!
     
  4. i heart queso Senior Member

    San Francisco, California
    English, Canada
    Or... "it's too much for me" -- meaning that you can't resist something. I can't take it anymore!! I have to eat that chocolate!! haha...

    Of course it could also mean "(something or someone) is stronger than me, but in an expression it would be the translation above. :)
     
  5. viera Senior Member

    Paris suburb
    English/French/Slovak
    I can' help it, I can't resist
     
  6. KaRiNe_Fr

    KaRiNe_Fr Senior Member

    France, Provence
    Français, French - France
    Je croyais que "I can't /help it/resist" était pour "je ne peux pas m'en empêcher" ? Je sais bien que derrière on mettrait souvent "c'est plus fort que moi !". Alors comment dirait-on le tout ? (ceci est une vraie question, pas une critique, je m'instruis ! :) )
     
  7. jhemono New Member

    Hello back,
    I think I_Heart_Queso has the right translation but viera's one is good too.
    I don't think this sentence depends on the context, to express what this sentence means litteraly, another way is used.
    Thank you everybody.
     
  8. nhat Senior Member

    France
    france
    Ah ! moi je pencherai beaucoup plus pour "I can't help it" comme l'ont dit deux autres personnes
    "I can't help it"==> c'est plus fort que moi, je ne peux pas m'en empecher. J'ai jamais vu "it's too much for me" mais qui sait...
     
  9. geve

    geve Senior Member

    France, Paris
    France, French
    En fait, quand on y pense, "c'est plus fort que moi, je ne peux pas m'en empêcher", c'est un peu redondant, non ? Du coup, pourquoi pas ça comme équivalent :
     
  10. geve

    geve Senior Member

    France, Paris
    France, French
    Yes, maybe you're right on this one... but we're just a big bunch of context freaks here. :D
     
  11. KaRiNe_Fr

    KaRiNe_Fr Senior Member

    France, Provence
    Français, French - France
    Ok, et vice-versa... ;)
     
  12. zam

    zam Senior Member

    England
    England -french (mother tongue) & english
    As with many similar phrases, it is context-dependant. The “best fit” here will largely depend on your french sentence.
    Most BE speakers would probably say in most contexts: “I just had to…” or “I couldn’t + verb…anymore” in those situations where it becomes almost impossible to refrain from doing something (I couldn’t control myself anymore/I couldn’t keep quiet anymore/I couldn’t take it any more, etc.). Or, as it’s been suggested, to emphasise further one’s own feelings of helplessness or obligation, you could say “I couldn’t help it, I just had to…” (vocal inflection on "had")

    e.g

    1) these handbags were so lovely, I just had to buy 10 of them, I couldn’t resist the temptation/I was powerless

    2) the whole situation was so unfair… I felt that it was no longer possible to let this serious incident slide without comment, I just had to say something about his appalling behaviour in front of everybody
     
  13. geve

    geve Senior Member

    France, Paris
    France, French
    Salut zam,
    Une question : est-ce que ta proposition n'est pas surtout adaptée à la justification après coup de ses actes ? Je veux dire, est-ce que ça marche aussi bien au présent, et pour un travers habituel ? eg. I just have to eat every single piece of chocolate that comes before my eyes...? (ce n'est pas pour pinailler, je me pose vraiment la question !)
     
  14. RocketGirl

    RocketGirl Senior Member

    Australia
    Canada, English
    Oui, ça marche.
     
  15. geve

    geve Senior Member

    France, Paris
    France, French
    Ok, merci ! :)
     

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