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  1. Ljubodrag Gráthas Senior Member

    Pančevo
    Serbia Serbian (native), English, Irish (Gaeilge)
    What’s the difference between these two sentences:

    Je suis chez moi

    Je suis ches soi

    Thanx in advance!
     
  2. gOgO

    gOgO Junior Member

    France, Bretagne
    france (Normandie)
    "Je suis chez moi" is "I am at home" i think,
    but i don't see what " je suis chez soi " means.

    " Chez soi " is used to say " être chez soi" = be at home
    or in the sentence " On est chez soi " .

    I'm not totally sure .
     
  3. fetchezlavache

    fetchezlavache Senior Member

    metz, france
    france
    you might want to check the spelling in second sentence please, as it is it means nothing in french... :(:(
     
  4. beri Senior Member

    Paris
    France
    "soi" is "oneself"
    chez soi = at oneself's house
    so you will use it with an "neutral" form, like "on" (can't think of another one for now)
     
  5. Ljubodrag Gráthas Senior Member

    Pančevo
    Serbia Serbian (native), English, Irish (Gaeilge)
    thank you all for the input! My spelling is terrible in any language, as my own uses the rule "Write as you speak", that is every letter corresponds to one single sound. No exceptions (well, only two or three, but literally two or three)

    I found this sentence on the Internet, and it puzzled me. That's why I had posted the question in the first place:

    Je suis chez soi dans quelconque part du monde et je peux vivre ou je veux sans avoir de la nostalgie

    I am beginning to thing that the French are very possessive about their language. Cute, that.
     
  6. fetchezlavache

    fetchezlavache Senior Member

    metz, france
    france
    well the sentence is not grammatically correct. it should be je suis chez moi dans tous les endroits du monde et je peux vivre où je veux sans avoir de nostalgie.


    but it means 'i feel at home in any part of the world and i can live wherever i want without feeling any nostagia'.
     
  7. julieb01 Senior Member

    Grenoble + Vendée
    France, French
    Hello Ljubodrag Gráthas,

    this sentence sounds like a literal translation from any language.

    In good French, we would say : Je suis chez moi n'importe où dans le monde et je peux vivre où je veux sans éprouver de la nostalgie
     
  8. AurélienD Junior Member

    Paris
    France, French
    Hi Ljubodrag Gráthas, (difficult to catch the firstname here :))
    Welcome on this forum.

    I understand you are puzzled as, for me, the sentence is not really correct. I would have say :
    Je suis chez moi n'importe où dans le monde et je peux vivre ou je veux sans nostalgie (sans être nostalgique).

    Are you sure the sentence was written by a native french speaker ?
     
  9. Ljubodrag Gráthas Senior Member

    Pančevo
    Serbia Serbian (native), English, Irish (Gaeilge)
    Thank you again, what you say certainly makes more sense to me and looks much better, even to the novice like me.
     
  10. Ljubodrag Gráthas Senior Member

    Pančevo
    Serbia Serbian (native), English, Irish (Gaeilge)
    Thank you for your welcome. I'm not a native speaker of English, but I think you might want to say "welcome to...". Just trying to be helpful, God knows if I'm right.
    ...
    Ah, just pronounce it as if it were written Lyoubodrague in French. It actually means Lovejoy, but is used as a personal name. The other one is its Irish translation, as I speak Irish Gaelic, and it's customary to have your name Gaelicized, if you wish (for fun, or for spite).
    ...
    I'm now definitively sure that the sentence was not written by a native speaker and I will erase it from my Word file, where I'm making a small dictionary with examples. Thank you all again.
     
  11. AurélienD Junior Member

    Paris
    France, French
    Thank you, you were right to correct it.
    It was said the last week end on this forum, but I've already forgotten :). (Typical error from french speakers (Bienvenue sur ce forum))
     
  12. EstherV Junior Member

    It might be what one calls "une coquille" in something written in a book or a newspapers, just an error when printed, don't you think ? Because "soi" is used with the neutral "on", for instance Qu'on est bien chez soi !, but je me sens chez moi partout où il y a des livres
    Estherv
     

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