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chin chopper

Discussion in 'English Only' started by fayekid, May 22, 2013.

  1. fayekid New Member

    中文
    "Brow, brow brinky, eye, eye, winky, mouth mouth merry, cheek, cheek cherry, chin chopper, chin chopper, chin, chin, chin." is a nursery rhyme from Wee Sing (a collection of nursery rhymes). In my bilingual copy of Wee Sing, the Chinese translation for "chin chopper" is "double chin", but I doubt it. Does chopper here have a meaning or is it only used for rhyming purposes? Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    Why do you doubt that it means "double chin"?

    In any case, a native English speaker's guess as to what chin chopper might mean will only be a guess. I suggest you post this in the Chinese forum and ask there.
     
  3. fayekid New Member

    中文

    Because I think the word "chopper" indicates sharpness and double chin is not sharp at all (only my guess).

    But why should I post this in the Chinese forum and ask there? It's an English nursery rhyme, so I think native speakers could better understand and interpret it. And I'm asking for the meaning of "chin chopper", not the Chinese translation for the term.
     
  4. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    When you said it was "a nursery rhyme from Wee Sing," I assumed it was a Chinese nursery rhyme that had been translated into English.

    Now that I've done a little research, I've found this on their website:
    Over 35 years ago, two music educators published a children’s songbook and called it Wee Sing. More than 65 million books, audios and live-action videos later, Wee Sing is recognized as one of the world’s most cherished children’s brands – and a leader in preschool learning through music.

    Pam Beall and Susan Nipp created that first songbook in 1977 because they were passionate about enriching the lives of kids through music and the performing arts. They knew that music stimulates cognitive, physical, and social development of young children. And through songs, chants, movement, and rhythm, they gain the readiness skills of language, coordination, auditory discrimination, body awareness, rhythmic proficiency, and self-confidence.
     
  5. fayekid New Member

    中文
    No wonder. I should have clarified that. But the editor of the bilignual version says "it's the most popular nursery rhyme book in America and almost every family has their own copy" , so I thought when I quote the book, people would know what I'm talking about. Judging from your answer, I should also doubt the editor's words. So you are saying that as a native speaker, you are not sure what "chin chopper" really means? What's your guess then? Thanks!
     
  6. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    My childhood predates their books by 30 years and I've lived outside the US for a long time -- hence, my ignorance of this literature. :)

    I haven't got a clue or a guess as to what a chin chopper might be. Ok, one wild guess: there is a form of sideburns called mutton chops that might be (or might not be) related. Here's a list of the 15 best mutton chops for you.
     
  7. Parla Senior Member

    New York City
    English - US
    "Chopper" has no meaning here, and "brinky" and "winky" aren't even real words. My guess is that the words brinky, winky, merry, cherry, and chopper were just tossed into this nonsense song for their sounds.
     
  8. fayekid New Member

    中文
    Thank you for your contribution, Copyright and Parla :) I think your guess is less wild, although I think winky here may have something to with "wink" (eye, eye, winky).
     
  9. fayekid New Member

    中文
    Thank you, Copyright, for letting me know what mutton chops are. Indeed, the pictures are impressive.
     
  10. Keith Bradford

    Keith Bradford Senior Member

    Brittany, NW France
    English (Midlands UK)
    Pure alliteration - it doesn't mean double chin or whiskers or anything else; it just begins with ch- and has two syllables, is all.
     
  11. fayekid New Member

    中文
    You've got a point there, Keith. So it would be the same if I say "chin chatter, chin chatter, chin chin chin" or "chin chipper, chin chipper, chin chin chin"?:)
     
  12. Keith Bradford

    Keith Bradford Senior Member

    Brittany, NW France
    English (Midlands UK)
    Absolutely...........
     

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