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Cigano

Discussion in 'Português (Portuguese)' started by CapnKozmar, Jan 14, 2006.

  1. CapnKozmar New Member

    Minnesota - USA
    USA - English
    Hello
    I speak no Portuguese although I feel I must have some of the the soul of Brazil flowing through my veins. I melt at the sound of the bossa nova and samba rhythm.
    We are purchasing and renaming a sailboat and are considering the name "Cigano". We like the sound of it, and to us in this part of North America, the name Gypsy most strongly signifies a "wanderer".
    We don't know, however, if the word invokes a negative feeling or has a bad connotation to a Portuguese speaking person.
    Could a native from Portugal and/or Brazil please comment on this.

    Many Thanks
    Dave
     
  2. Vanda

    Vanda Moderesa de Beagá

    Belo Horizonte, BRASIL
    Português/ Brasil
    Yes and no. :) Cigano, beside the people, is used to refer to a wanderer -as you 've mentioned -, also to a smart person and a smart seller who tries to trick persons. BUT whenever it has to do with songs, novels (literarily) it is a word that has a romantic connotation. There are plenty of songs about coração cigano (gipsy heart): a guy or a girl who doesn't like to be tied to somenone, or else that is tired of being a wanderer and now wants to be loyal to his/her 'elected'.
    For me, let's say, as a name of a sailboat it would convey a romantic view of an owner that just likes being a nomad of the seas. I like it!:)
    I don't know about Portugal. Let's wait for our Portuguese friends...
     
  3. Outsider Senior Member

    Portuguese (Portugal)
    "Cigano" can have a negative connotation in some contexts, but it may also be a harmless descriptive word. If you name a boat Cigano, I see no reason for anyone to assume a negative connotation.
     
  4. CapnKozmar New Member

    Minnesota - USA
    USA - English
    Muitos agradecimentos. Cigano será.
    Nós somos muito felizes com o nome.

    Eu desejo que eu falei o Português. Algum dia eu.

    I hope I said that correctly.



    Dave
     
  5. Outsider Senior Member

    Portuguese (Portugal)
    We can understand it.
     
  6. Khany New Member

    England
    England, English, Urdu, Pushto
    Can a woman be refered to as "Cigano". If not then what is the term used for a women to call her a "Wanderer/Gypsi"?
     
  7. Outsider Senior Member

    Portuguese (Portugal)
    Cigana, although that doesn't quite mean the same as "wanderer". In Portugal, cigano is the name of a specific ethnicity.
     
  8. Khany New Member

    England
    England, English, Urdu, Pushto
    Would this offend anyone. If I called a lady "Cigano".
     
  9. Vinny Ribeiro Senior Member

    Uppsala, Sverige
    Português & English
    No. It's the same as calling a gypsy ...a gypsy haha. It's no offense at all.
     
  10. Outsider Senior Member

    Portuguese (Portugal)
    Well, in Portugal cigano and cigana can have a derogatory meaning in some contexts. But as long as your body language is friendly they should not be understood negatively.

    If you called a lady cigano, she might also have found it awkward that you used the masculine version of the word instead of the feminine cigana. But if it's clear to her that Portuguese is not your native language, then she should accept it with no problem.
     
  11. Vinny Ribeiro Senior Member

    Uppsala, Sverige
    Português & English
    Yes. I suppose that's true to Brazil and America, too. =)
     
  12. Vanda

    Vanda Moderesa de Beagá

    Belo Horizonte, BRASIL
    Português/ Brasil
    I've merged this thread with another one on "cigano". Please read the posts above. And there is still this other topic on the same subject.
    the usage of cigano
     

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