cittadini stranieri

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by Lula_, Jan 11, 2013.

  1. Lula_ Senior Member

    Madrid
    Italiano-Italia
    "Courses are FREE and open to all foreigners / foreign nationals"

    Qual è il modo più corretto per dire "stranieri" in inglese? A mio avviso, il termine migliore che abbiamo in italiano è "migranti".
    Buona serata!
     
  2. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
  3. Lula_ Senior Member

    Madrid
    Italiano-Italia
    Mi scuso se non mi sono spiegata bene, è una frase che ho letto su un volantino che presenta corsi di italiano "gratuiti e aperti a tutti cittadini stranieri". Mi chiedevo quale fosse il corrispondente inglese di "cittadini stranieri" più corretto anche "politicamente", quello che in italiano corrisponderebbe, appunto, al termine "migranti".
    Si dice foreigners, foreign nationals, immigrants?
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2013
  4. CPA Senior Member

    Rome
    British English/Italian - bilingual
    Direi semplicemente "foreigners". Non tutti gli stranieri presenti in Italia sono dei migranti.
     
  5. joanvillafane Senior Member

    U.S., New Jersey
    U.S. English
    I have a problem with "foreigners," though. Is it really necessary? If the course offers Italian lessons to people needing to learn Italian, do you have to mention their citizenship status?
     
  6. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
    It's supposed to mean "non native Italian speakers" which are actually foreigners (or people from South Tirol)
     
  7. CPA Senior Member

    Rome
    British English/Italian - bilingual
    Unfortunately, there is a growing percentage of Italians who have all but forgotten how to write and can barely understand what they read ("analfabetismo di ritorno"). Would Italian lessons for them be structured in the same way as for foreigners?
     
  8. joanvillafane Senior Member

    U.S., New Jersey
    U.S. English
    Hi, CPA ;) - I see your point. The best alternative is something along the lines of what Paul wrote - Italian courses for non-native speakers.
     
  9. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
    I don't think so. However uneducated they may be, they'd still know much more than non-native speakers, especially about basic grammar and spoken language.
     
  10. CPA Senior Member

    Rome
    British English/Italian - bilingual
    Thanks, Paul. I suspected as much. "Non-native Italian speakers" solves the problem nicely. How dreadfully un-PC we are here! :)
     
  11. Lula_ Senior Member

    Madrid
    Italiano-Italia
    Thank you!
    Yes, as Paul said I didn't give enough context (really sorry!). Let me tell you something more: it's a flier about basic computer and Italian language classes for non-native speakers who work/live in Italy. I see your point CPA, not all "foreigneres" are "immigrants" but these are courses for what in Italian I'd call "migranti". They're not addressed to "analfabeti di ritorno" or Italian people with low educational level. As a matter of fact, at the end I read: "I cittadini stranieri devono possedere i regolari documenti che attestino la presenza sul territorio italiano. Verrà data precedenza a donne con bassi livelli di istruzione, immigrate da meno di 3 anni".
    So would it really be unfair to say "foreigners" or any of the solutions I suggested in my first thread? I really like "non-native speakers" but in an imaginary flier it could be too long.
    I wish you all a nice and relaxing Saturday and thank you for your help!
    I hope you understand my bad English! :p

    What about "newcomers" then?
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2013

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