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clean up "a breeze"

Discussion in 'English Only' started by ESC85, Jun 27, 2011.

  1. ESC85

    ESC85 Senior Member

    Korean
    "the durable nonstick coating helps ensure effortless food release
    and clean up a breeze."




    # What does it mean when it comes to "clean up a breeze"?
     
  2. Parla Senior Member

    New York City
    English - US
    This is obviously a quote from an ad. It appears to me that a word is missing, and that the sentence should read: The durable nonstick coating helps ensure effortless food release and makes clean-up a breeze.

    ". . . makes clean-up a breeze" means makes the process of cleaning up [the pot or pan] very easy. We say that something is "a breeze" when it's very easy to do.
     
  3. ESC85

    ESC85 Senior Member

    Korean

    It's quoted as it was on the original ad.

    In my opinion, "breeze" can mean "refuse left in the process of making coke or burning charcoal", can't it?
     
  4. ESC85

    ESC85 Senior Member

    Korean
    "The durable nonstick coating helps ensure effortless food release
    and clean up a breeze."




    # Someone said "a breeze" is things easy to do. But, in my opinion, breeze can mean "refuse left in the process of making coke or burning charcoal".


    What do you think?

    Please let me know your feedback.
     
  5. Myridon

    Myridon Senior Member

    Texas
    English - US
    Not even remotely. What gives you that idea? Your quote is about a pan for making donuts.
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2011
  6. Cagey post mod

    California
    English - US
    I see that it is all over the internet in this form. Nonetheless, it is an error.
    "helps ensure [...] clean-up a breeze" does not make sense in English.

    Like Parla, I would expect, "and makes clean-up a breeze." Another possibility is that it was meant to be "helps ensure effortless food release and clean-up" but then someone added "a breeze" without realizing that they needed a second verb.

    Added: I agree with Myridon about "ash".
     
  7. Parla Senior Member

    New York City
    English - US
    Then there's a typo in the original ad, since it doesn't make sense without the missing word.

    No, breeze doesn't mean refuse. It means a light, refreshing wind and is used metaphorically, as I said, to mean an easy-to-accomplish task.
     
  8. Cagey post mod

    California
    English - US
    I see that our dictionary lists breeze with a second meaning:
    small cinders mixed with sand and cement to make breeze blocks.
    And dictionary.com has:
    cinders, ash, or dust from coal, coke, or charcoal.
    However, this use is rare, as you can see from the fact that three native speakers (including me) didn't recognize it. We are not likely to use it to refer to the burnt dough left on a pan. In context, it wouldn't make sense to say "and clean-up an ash."
     
  9. Enquiring Mind Senior Member

    UK/Česká republika
    English - the Queen's
    As the other posters say, it doesn't makes sense in the form given, but there is no hyphen between "clean" and "up", so possibly all that is missing is an "s" on "clean".

    The durable nonstick coating helps ensure effortless food release and cleans up a breeze.

    It's "a breeze" (very easy) to clean or clean up.

    On the subject of "breeze", it is, indeed, a technical term for cinders and ash. We have something in Britain called "breeze blocks" - concrete blocks mixed with ash and cinders used for building, but this technical meaning has nothing to do with the example you give. It's "breeze" (uncountable) so you couldn't say "a breeze" in this technical sense.
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2011
  10. pob14 Senior Member

    Central Illinois
    American English
    "Cleans up a breeze" doesn't make any sense to me either. (And I'll be the fourth to say I'd never heard of the ash/cinder definition of "breeze.")
     

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