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clearer vs. more clear

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Grammar / Gramática Español-Inglés' started by vmtnezgil, Feb 18, 2006.

  1. vmtnezgil Senior Member

    SPAIN
    No estoy seguro si se dice de una u otra forma o se puede decir de ambas, me podeis ayudar?
     
  2. mhp Senior Member

    American English
    se puede usar una u otra. No creo que haya preferencia
     
  3. vmtnezgil Senior Member

    SPAIN
    Gracias, personalmente me suena mejor lo segundo pero pensaba que era mas correcto lo pimero por tener clear 2 silabas....
     
  4. jacinta Senior Member

    California
    USA English
    Sí, iba a decir lo mismo. A mí no me suena bien, "clearer". ¡"More clear" es más facil pronunciar! aunque es totalmente correcto decir clearer.
     
  5. Leslie_16 New Member

    Mèxico
    Me podrìan ayudar ¿¿¿Cuàl es el significado de clearer???
     
  6. mother earth Senior Member

    Atlanta, Georgia, USA
    USA/English
    The water in my swimming pool is clearer (more clear) now that it's clean.
     
  7. rafaelgan Senior Member

    U.S.A
    Spanish
    Entonces hay veces en las que se puede agregar -er y -more y las dos se puede usar?

    Como se cuando se puede?
     
  8. SEXTO SENTIDO

    SEXTO SENTIDO Senior Member

    MEXICO CITY
    SPANISH/ MEXICO
    Hi when you have adjetives whit two sylables you have to add er = more
    examples :

    cheap -cheaper mas barato
    strong-stronger mas fuerte

    When you want to say " el mas " you have to write " est " endings.
    examples

    great-greatest - el mas grandioso
    strongest- el mas fuerte

    In adjetives whit three sylables or more you must use " more ".
    Your car is more expensive.
    She is more beautiful .....
    Regards.
     
  9. argentina84

    argentina84 Senior Member

    Göteborg, Sweden
    Argentina Spanish
    Those are the "rules" for English comparative and superlative adjectives...but...so..What happens with "clear"? According to the rule,the correct form should be "clearer"
     
  10. Dawei Senior Member

    English (USA)
    I don't think it's ever incorrect to use the more + adj. form instead of adj +er, except maybe in the case of the irregulars...it just sounds unnatural a lot of the time.
     
  11. argentina84

    argentina84 Senior Member

    Göteborg, Sweden
    Argentina Spanish
    Yeah! I agree with you! I would like to be free and use the more+ adj construction more often ,but if I do so...I will not pass my exams! lol Teachers are still very prescriptive...
     
  12. Salsamore

    Salsamore Senior Member

    Calilfornia
    USA English (Mich. & Calif.)
    In formal English grammar, "el más" translates to "more"/"-er" when the object is being compared to only one other item. See this thread.

    True. A lot of the time, phrasing with "more" is used for emphasis:
    The pool is clearer now.
    The pool is more clear now.​
    It's foggy today, but it was even foggier yesterday.
    It's foggy today, but it was even more foggy yesterday.
    This might especially be true for words like "clear" where the "-er" can get slurred.
     
  13. alumnisimo Senior Member

    liberty, New York
    english usa
    Sometimes usage wins out over the straight application of grammar rules. For emphasis it is okay to say things like "more clear" but the native speaker must be able to appreciate that your attempting to drive home a point or his or her ears will perk up and label you a speaker of another language. This is most important if you are involved in international espionage. As a rule I would stick to the rules as it is more safe. I mean safer.
     
  14. mother earth Senior Member

    Atlanta, Georgia, USA
    USA/English
    It's foggy today, but it was even foggier yesterday.

    The explanation by Sexto Sentido is clear, clearer than mine was! Actually, I think it is the clearest explanation of all :)
     
  15. geostan

    geostan Senior Member

    English Canada
    Some of the threads suggest that it is almost always correct to use either form, but I disagree. This is where context and common practice come in.
    For instance, clearer and more clear sound perfectly fine to me, although it is safer to go with clearer. The example of "The pool is more clear." sounds wrong to my ear. And what about "short"? Except for obvious cases, such as "He is more short than fat." Would one ever say "more short"? I wouldn't.

    This topic is a tough one. I would go along with the member who suggested following the rules. You'll be much safer that way.

    Cheers!
     
  16. SEXTO SENTIDO

    SEXTO SENTIDO Senior Member

    MEXICO CITY
    SPANISH/ MEXICO
    Thank you very much , a explanation from natives is very useful.
     
  17. chugees Junior Member

    Argentina - Buenos Aires
    Argentina - Spanish
    Speak more clear on the phone.

    or

    Speak more clearly on the phone.

    thanks!!
     
  18. geostan

    geostan Senior Member

    English Canada
     
  19. wardo

    wardo Senior Member

    Central & Northern Spain
    Spanish - Spain
    There is one point involving phonetics that we are overlooking here. The pronunciation of adjectives such as "clear, dear, etc.." ending with the same sound as the suffix "-er" tend to appear with the "more" form for obvious reasons.
     
  20. geostan

    geostan Senior Member

    English Canada
    Nice idea, but I don't think so.
     
  21. Frai Escoba

    Frai Escoba Senior Member

    Hello every body,
    This thread is very instructive but still could not answer my question. Would you mind if I add a layer to the discussion. I was in a meeting this morning where a native English speaker said: "it will be a little bit more clearer". And here I am, asking to myself if this is right or not.
    Thanks for your lights !
     
  22. mother earth Senior Member

    Atlanta, Georgia, USA
    USA/English
    Hi there! That is definitely not proper English. It is also not a common error. Any native speaker's ears would have caught that as a glitch.
     
  23. geostan

    geostan Senior Member

    English Canada
    Not so. This is a common error, even by some so-called educated speakers. But it is incorrect. More clear (perhaps), clearer (better), but not both.
     
  24. Frai Escoba

    Frai Escoba Senior Member

    Thank you so much ! question solved !
     
  25. sebalaugh New Member

    Mexican Spanish
    obviamente es clearer porque NO TIENE DOS SILABAS!! no se pronuncia cle-ar es clear, todo junto y cuando los adjetivos son cortos se utiliza er, no more... son regals del ingles, no se pueden las dos
     
  26. geostan

    geostan Senior Member

    English Canada
    Hay casos en que se dice "more clear." That explanation is more clear than not. No me gusta tanto este ejemplo, pero así se diría.
     
  27. duvija

    duvija Senior Member

    Chicago
    Spanish - Uruguay

    I agree with wardo. We tend to avoid stuff like 'clearer, dearer, etc.'
     
  28. inib

    inib Senior Member

    La Rioja, Spain
    British English
    I'm not sure I agree either. "clear" ends in schwa, as does the ending er, but I can't see a problem there, as when we add the ending we pronounce the intermediate r.
    To compare: we (British) don't pronounce the r at the end of labour, but have no problems in pronouncing labourer.
     
  29. duvija

    duvija Senior Member

    Chicago
    Spanish - Uruguay
    It ends in schwa or in rhoticized schwa? [ɚ]
    It's a problem.
     
  30. Milton Sand

    Milton Sand Modómano, 'mano

    Bucaramanga, Colombia
    Español (Colombia)
    Hi,
    I still have the same doubt. If I needed to mean more clearness than "clearer" does, it's clear that "more clearer" is wrong. Should I use "even clearer"?
    Thanks.
    ;)
     
  31. inib

    inib Senior Member

    La Rioja, Spain
    British English
    Sorry Duvija, I only know very basic phonetics and have no idea what a rhoticized schwa is. I'll try to look it up now. I know you're an expert on this, so if you'd like to explain it to me, I'd be very grateful. If you think we're going too far off the original subject, it could be by private message. Only if you have time, of course.
     
  32. duvija

    duvija Senior Member

    Chicago
    Spanish - Uruguay

    Great! question for all the readers. Should we open a new link? or just do private messg? (I'd love either of those). If no one answers, will do private.
     
  33. chileno

    chileno Senior Member

    Las Vegas, Nv. USA
    Castellano - Chile
    Correct. But not as a superlative, right?
     
  34. Thomas Veil Senior Member

    English - USA
    Do you mean "you're"?

    There's a rule in English that is something is the most out of two things, you're supposed to use -er, but if it's the most of more than two things, it's -est. So if you have two children, the one who was born first would be your "older" or "elder" child, but if you have three children, the one who was born first would be your "oldest".
     
  35. Thomas Veil Senior Member

    English - USA
    "Clear" and "er" are completely different vowels. "Clear" has a diphthong of long-e and then the schwa, while "er" has a (r-colored?) schwa. If it's decided that this discussion should be in a different thread, then the moderators should move this post there.
     
  36. chileno

    chileno Senior Member

    Las Vegas, Nv. USA
    Castellano - Chile
    So, if I understand this well let me try a couple of phrases.

    My mom had 3 children and I am the oldest.

    Your mom had two children and you are the older one. I cannot say you are the oldest.

    Or, that woman had two children, and that one is the older one. I cannot use "the oldest"

    Correct?
     
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2010
  37. Istriano

    Istriano Senior Member

    -
    I've never heard ''make myself clearer'' only ''make myself more clear''. ;)
     
  38. duvija

    duvija Senior Member

    Chicago
    Spanish - Uruguay
    Can you swear that nobody, who has only two children, never says 'my oldest' referring to the first?
     
  39. 140278

    140278 Senior Member

    Peruviano espánish
    It reminds me of fun and more fun (not funner).
     
  40. Istriano

    Istriano Senior Member

    -
    But I've heard the funnest thing, and my dearest friend ;)
     
  41. inib

    inib Senior Member

    La Rioja, Spain
    British English
    But fun is a noun, so you can say fun, more fun and the most fun, just as you can say, money, more money and the most money.
    Funny is an adjective, so you say funny, funnier, the funniest.
    Unless there is an American usage that I'm unaware of, funner and funnest not only don't exist, but they make no sense.
     
  42. Prof. Ivinson New Member

    Spanish-English
    Clear tiene una sola sílaba /klir/ en británico suena como si tuviera dos porque alargan el sonido de las terminaciones ...er /a/. clear /klia/.


    Clearer.

    Exceptions. Higher-more high. E.g: The Most High. "El Altísimo" bible.
     
  43. mhp Senior Member

    American English
    Or at least it used to be. But fun used as an adjective is quite common in informal speech (e.g. a fun person); its superlative form is an attention-getter: "The funnest iPod ever" commercial.
     
  44. inib

    inib Senior Member

    La Rioja, Spain
    British English
    Thanks mhp. I need to up-date my English and/or watch more telly!
     
  45. karluSChka Junior Member

    México
    Mexican Spanish
    What about is I want to translate this:

    "Al hacer esto, la visión es más clara"

    Should I say: "After doing this, the visión is more clear" or "After doing this, the vision is clearer"

    I used the second one, but I'd like to know your opinions. Thanks.
     
  46. Tazzler Senior Member

    Maryland
    American English
    "clearer" sounds better.
     
  47. chileno

    chileno Senior Member

    Las Vegas, Nv. USA
    Castellano - Chile

    By doing this, the vision is clearer.
     
  48. lic.danielguerra New Member

    Español mexicano
    Ok, I think the original point here was:

    Why are the following adjectives not normally compared with "ER"? (lost, fun, grim, clear, live, red...)
    If you know a long list or link about this group of adjectives, PLEASE comment!
    An explanation or rule doesn't seem to exist I think.
     
  49. k-in-sc

    k-in-sc Senior Member

    Grimmer, clearer, redder -- all normal. Not sure where you got those.
     
  50. lic.danielguerra New Member

    Español mexicano
    Well, some of those one-syllable adjectives can be compared with both ER or MORE. I guess what many students and teachers want to know is WHY?
     

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