1. piscuchita New Member

    El Salvador, Spanish
    ¿Cómo podría traducirse el término "colista"? En referencia al equipo de fútbol o de otros deportes que ocupa el último lugar en una tabla de posiciones.

    En específico, me gustaría saber si hay alguna palabra en inglés que sea un equivalente exacto del término en español, o si no lo hay.

    De antemano gracias por su ayuda.
     
  2. PAUL B.T.

    PAUL B.T. Senior Member

    ESPAÑA
    Spanish
    "Back - marker" is similar in meaning, but I think it's more referring to track & field.
    I'm sure there's some phrase for that, but I just can't remember now.

     
  3. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    Se puede decir "Derby County are propping up the Premiership table": Derby County es colista y está "respaldando" todo el resto de la tabla. :( (El infinitivo es "to prop up".)
    "Derby County are bottom of the table" es otra manera de decirlo.
     
  4. PAUL B.T.

    PAUL B.T. Senior Member

    ESPAÑA
    Spanish
    Propping up....hm, quite curious. I'll take note of it.
    Coming from a British, it must be right when it comes to football.

     
  5. PAUL B.T.

    PAUL B.T. Senior Member

    ESPAÑA
    Spanish
    Thanks to johnnyneuro, I've found another one: "they've won the wooden spoon" (probably from the Six Nations tournament:D)

    P.S.- It's still not the one I was looking for. I'll try taking some phosphorus...
     
  6. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    Buenos días, Paul,

    What do you mean by "the one I was looking for"? Do you mean that it must be a noun, as is "colista"?

    The term "wooden spoon" is only used when the season or tournament is over. If the championship is in progress, you cannot describe the "colista" as the "wooden spoon".
     
  7. PAUL B.T.

    PAUL B.T. Senior Member

    ESPAÑA
    Spanish
    I know, that's why I said what I said.

     
  8. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    Spanish uses a noun for this but English doesn't. To the best of my knowledge, an exact equivalent of "colista" does not exist. You described "propping up" as "curious", but I heard it used on television twenty minutes ago.
     
  9. PAUL B.T.

    PAUL B.T. Senior Member

    ESPAÑA
    Spanish
    You really mean TV is a good language teacher? Don't make me laugh,pal.

     
  10. hellohola123

    hellohola123 Senior Member

    English
    yes, there isnt a noun. the closest translation would simply be bottom of the table.
     
  11. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    I use the expression "propping up the table", other people use it and television used it today. Television does not always misuse the language. There is nothing "curious" about the expression. It may not exist in American English but it certainly exists on this side of the Atlantic.
     
  12. iskndarbey Senior Member

    Lima, Perú
    US, English
    'Propping up the table' doesn't exist in American English but it doesn't strike me as particularly odd, especially given some of the more obscure British expressions on this site! In the US we would say a team is 'at the bottom of the rankings', 'at the bottom of their division', 'in last place' or any number of other more colorful things.
     
  13. hellohola123

    hellohola123 Senior Member

    English
    propping up the table does exist in the UK...and is commonly used.
     
  14. piscuchita New Member

    El Salvador, Spanish
    Muchas gracias a todos por sus comentarios. Ha sido de mucha ayuda :).
     
  15. nv1962

    nv1962 Senior Member

    Reno, Nevada (USA)
    es, nl, en-us
    Just a note to say I find the expression "propping up the table" a great, humorous euphemism; I've heard it used quit a few times by football commentators. (No, I don't use the s-word... I stubbornly refer to that other sport people in the US refer to as "football" instead as "American football".)
     
  16. sancholibre Senior Member

    Mexico City
    US English, learning Mexican Spanish
    You can say:

    to be dead last
    to finish (dead) last - VERY USED AMONGST RUNNERS !!!
     

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