Come previsto le volanti mi sono dietro

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by sashabella, Jan 8, 2010.

  1. sashabella Junior Member

    English
    Ciao tutti! I read this in a comic book, "Come previsto le volanti me sono dietro la valigetta e qui con me". I get that it is saying something like, "as expected your steering the luggage is in the back here with me". I don't know it doesn't make sense to me?
     
  2. tantalus Junior Member

    Durham, NC, USA
    Italian
    Are you sure this is the exact sentence you read?

    Please double check it, it does not actually make sense to me.

    Volanti refers to police cars probably. It may mean also 'steering wheels'.
     
  3. sashabella Junior Member

    English
    Okay so I looked again and saw that I got some of the punctuation wrong. It is, "Come previsto le volanti mi sono dietro. La valigetta e' qui con me." Idk, if this makes a difference?
     
  4. tantalus Junior Member

    Durham, NC, USA
    Italian
    It does indeed.

    Volanti is slang for policemen (police cars). I would translate it as
    'as expected, policemen are on my way (*). The suitcase is here with me'.

    Hope it makes some sense.

    (*) you use it for 'are following me', right? Or simply 'are behind me'; I am not sure what is more English, though. You know better than me for sure, but this is the meaning.
     
  5. MStraf

    MStraf Senior Member

    The police is on my back (from "Police on my back", The Clash :) )
     
  6. tantalus Junior Member

    Durham, NC, USA
    Italian
    Excellent, MStraf :)
     
  7. pescara Senior Member

    Connecticut
    English-USA
    Direi:
    The police are on my back
    The policeman is on my back

    Ciao.
     
  8. tantalus Junior Member

    Durham, NC, USA
    Italian
    Wow, that is interesting, pescara. Why would you use a verb in the plural from sicne police is singular (isn't it?).

    ----- [edited] -----
    It is not. Sorry, I just found the word: I had never noticed that 'police' is only plural in English.
    Thanks a lot for pointing this out; very instructive.
     
  9. pescara Senior Member

    Connecticut
    English-USA
    Police refers to the institution, not the person. It always uses a plural form of the verb:
    The police are following me.
    The police want me to come to headquarters.
    The police believe the suspect is guilty.

    In Italian, la polizia is singular, but in English, the police is singular.

    Ha senso?

    Ciao.
     
  10. tantalus Junior Member

    Durham, NC, USA
    Italian
    Ha senso. Grazie mille. [I guess you meant: 'but in English the police is plural'].

    Shame on me I had never noticed that. Well, I am glad I did not have to deal with them, though :)
     
  11. sashabella Junior Member

    English
    Thanks everyone!!!
     

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