comma before and after 'also' [adverb]: verify the changes and, also,

Discussion in 'English Only' started by The Godfather, Apr 2, 2013.

  1. The Godfather Junior Member

    India - Hindi & English
    I am asking my collegue to verify the changes made by me in an application. And also asking him to verify the whole application. Which of the below sentence makes sense. (which sentence has correct use of comma)

    -Please verify the chenges and, also, verify the whole application.
    -Please verify the same and also verify the whole application.

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    You have two tasks and there may be an order of operation to them. So for clarity, I might say:
    Please verify the changes and then verify the entire application.
    Please verify the changes before verifying the entire application.


    But if you don't want a sequence, then these would work:
    Please verify the changes and also verify the entire application.
    Please verify the changes and also the entire application.
     
  3. purpleannex Senior Member

    North Essex/Suffolk border
    British English
    Please check my application.

    Why use ten words when four will do?

    Please verify the changes, andalso, verify the whole application.

    Please verify the changes, and also verify the whole application.

    but you don't need the comma...
     
  4. The Godfather Junior Member

    India - Hindi & English
    Theres no sequence. He can verify the changes while he is verifying the entire application.

    I think, the first sentence makes more sense. does punctuation marks not make more sense?

    I felt that we just ignore some punctuation marks in our sentences, do we?

    Thanks!
     
  5. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    Please verify the application after the changes are made.
     
  6. The Godfather Junior Member

    India - Hindi & English
    Thanks Copyright/pupleannex.

    I just wanted to know the importance of using punctuation marks properly. We many times don't need comma(,) but it might make perfect sense as how the sentence is spoken by the speaker.
     
  7. The Godfather Junior Member

    India - Hindi & English
    Yeah. This makes sense. We don't need two commas. Thanks Copyright.

    "the same" in second sentence refers to "changes". Sorry i forgot to edit the second sentence.
     
  8. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    Sorry, but that post had the comma in the wrong place and it won't accept an edit. So here it is again ...

    Taking your first sentence, I would use either of these:

    Please verify the changes, and also verify the whole application.
    Please verify the changes and also verify the whole application.

    And I would probably use the first one, with a single comma, to add visual stress to the fact that there are two parts to the request.
     
  9. Jim2996 Senior Member

    Boston, MA
    American English
    There are a couple of standard conventions about commas that you need to know, and a couple of optional, judgement calls.

    You have two simple sentences that you are connecting with the simple conjunction and. (Your sentences are commands, but commands are sentences.)

    Please verify the changes, and verify the whole application.
    This really is just commas at the most basic level: There is a comma before and—always; for everyone, this is the rule.
    Some people don't put commas before coordinating conjunctions, but that is not your issue.

    Of course, if you write something that is not a compound sentence; you don't need a comma
    Please verify the changes and the whole application.

    Your second issue, which you also have to handle, is how to insert the also.
    If you had a longer insert, it would need commas around it. For example
    Please verify the changes, and, while you are at it, verify the whole application.
    With short insertions, this isn't mandatory, and it's usually too many commas. You can think of it as an adverb. So, you have a choice; it's either
    Please verify the changes, and, also, verify the whole application. (I think too many commas) or
    Please verify the changes, and also verify the whole application.

    One more choice for you to make: There is a 'rule' that you can add commas to indicate how it is spoken or to make it easier for the reader to understand.
    Please verify the changes, and also, verify the whole application.
    If this sounds or reads better for you, use it. It is my choice, but you are not me.

    The goal is for commas to be your friends.
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2013
  10. Einstein

    Einstein Senior Member

    Milano, Italia
    UK, English
    I am one of those people who don't put commas before "and" unless it is preceded by a parenthesis:
    I have invited Susan, whom you already know, and Jane.
    I would not put a comma in
    I have invited Susan and you'll be meeting her later.
    Some say there is a case for putting a comma before "and" in a variety of situations (e.g. "red, yellow, blue, and green"), but this is the first time I've heard it quoted as a rule where it is a coordinating conjunction between two clauses.
     
  11. The Godfather Junior Member

    India - Hindi & English
    Thanks jim2996! :)
     

Share This Page