comma before 'too' [adverb, end position]: I hope you will, too.

Discussion in 'English Only' started by bozam, Apr 28, 2013.

  1. bozam Junior Member

    Australia
    Slovene
    Could I get some help with the commas in the following sentence, please?

    My sister loves to cook this for her family and I hope you will too.


    Thank you in advance, I really appreciate your help.
     
  2. Andygc

    Andygc Senior Member

    Devon
    British English
    Hello bozam. You need to tell us where you would like to put your comma and why you are not sure about it. You can edit your post so that all the information is in the post, and not partly in the title - because the title will be changed.
     
  3. bozam Junior Member

    Australia
    Slovene
    Deal, thank you for letting me know.

    So, this is the sentence:

    My sister loves to cook this for her family and I hope you will too.

    I've added the word "dish", so the sentence is a bit clearer. In school, I've learnt there's a comma before "too", and that is my suggestion. I'm just confused that the original (proofread) sentence doesn't have any commas at all.

    My sister loves to cook this dish for her family and I hope you will, too.
     
  4. Cagey post mod

    California
    English - US
    Hello bozam. :)

    I know this answer is a bit late in coming, and may no longer be useful, but you provided the requested information, (thank you) so I'll give it a try. Here is what I would do:

    I would put a comma after 'and', because the verb has a new subject.
    I would not put a comma before 'too' in final position in this sentence.
     
  5. bozam Junior Member

    Australia
    Slovene
    Hello Cagey
    thank you for your reply, I appreciate it.

    You said you'd place a comma after "and", like this:
    My sister loves to cook this for her family and, I hope you will too.

    Isn't it more logical to put the coma before "and", like this:
    My sister loves to cook this for her family, and I hope you will too.

    If not, could you please explain why comma after and not before "and"?


    One more question, if I may:

    If people (readers) read this sentence published somewhere without any commas, would they realise there's a comma missing at all?

    Like this:
    My sister loves to cook this for her family and I hope you will too.

    The new (modern) proofreading style apparently doesn't place as many commas as us (older generations) are used to, and by following modern proofreading I assume there wouldn't be any commas places in this sentence. I wonder if an average reader would even notice there's a comma missing?

    Thank you in advance for your opinion.
     
  6. Cagey post mod

    California
    English - US
    You are correct about placing the comma before 'and'. That was a slip on my part. :eek:

    As for your second question, I can't say what most people would do. I would miss it.

    The University of Sussex Guide to Punctuation by Larry Trask, refers to this as a 'joining comma'. He doesn't mention any exceptions to its use. However, that doesn't answer your question about actual use.
     
  7. bozam Junior Member

    Australia
    Slovene
    Thank you so much for your help, I really appreciate it. Thank you for the link as well, I haven't seen that webpage before and it's exactly what I need to learn as much as possible.
     

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