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comma btw adjective and noun: old-fashioned, nostalgic, feeling

Discussion in 'English Only' started by 8769, Jan 18, 2011.

  1. 8769 Senior Member

    Japanese and Japan
    Hello,
    I would like your help.

    The following is part of a dictation that I took, listening to a conversation in a radio program broadcast in Japan. The speaker is talking about the expression of “U.S. of A.”[FONT=MS 明朝] [/FONT]

    1. I think many Americans would use it if they want to speak from a very strong, sort of patriotic, old-fashioned, nostalgic feeling for the country.
    2. [FONT=MS 明朝] [/FONT]I think many Americans would use it if they want to speak from a very strong, sort of patriotic, old-fashioned, nostalgic, feeling for the country.

    I wrote #1, but I’m not sure if it #2 is not appropriate. I’d like your guess, please.
     
  2. se16teddy

    se16teddy Senior Member

    London
    English - England
    When there a list of adjectives occurs before a noun, we often put a comma between the adjectives.
    As far as I know, we don't put a comma between the list of adjectives and the noun.
     
  3. 8769 Senior Member

    Japanese and Japan
    Thank you, se16teddy, for your prompt reply.
    Let me make sure.
    Which do you mean, #1 or #3 below?
    1. I think many Americans would use it if they want to speak from a very strong, sort of patriotic, old-fashioned, nostalgic feeling for the country.
    3. I think many Americans would use it if they want to speak from a very strong sort of patriotic old-fashioned nostalgic feeling for the country.
     
  4. se16teddy

    se16teddy Senior Member

    London
    English - England
    I think you need your commas here, to help your readers identify where each item on the list begins and where it ends:
    I think many Americans would use it if they want to speak from a very strong, sort of patriotic, old-fashioned, nostalgic feeling for the country.
     
  5. Rana_pipiens

    Rana_pipiens Senior Member

    Salt Lake City, Utah
    USA / English
    Commas are optional after patriotic and old-fashioned. They help the flow of the sentence, but it isn't wrong to leave them out, and indeed modern usage is towards leaving out commas in adjective series.

    You say this is a transcript from something spoken. How much of a pause was there between strong and sort?

    If the speaker didn't pause, then sort means type and is the object of from, and there should not be a comma after strong, because the comma separates an adjective and its noun.

    If the speaker left a gap between strong and sort, and ran sort of patriotic together, then sort of is an adverb, meaning somewhat, modifying patriotic. In that case, the comma is needed. However, from the context, I doubt this meaning was intended.
     

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