commandments whose rationales transcend the ken of human intellect

Discussion in 'עברית (Hebrew)' started by airelibre, Nov 28, 2012.

  1. airelibre

    airelibre Senior Member

    English - London
    My question involves a translation of the phrase "commandments whose rationales transcend the ken of human intellect".

    I'm wondering whether the sentence sounds better with rationale(s) in plural or not (please also correct/improve my translation if you wish).

    מצוות שהנמקתן מתעלה את ידיעת האינטלקט האנושי

    מצוות שהנמקותיהן מתעלות את ידיעת האינטלקט האנושי
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 29, 2012
  2. Stifled Junior Member

    Hebrew
    Hi,

    מצוות שהנמקתן מתעלה את ידיעת האינטלקט האנושי
    = מצוות שהנמקתן מתעלה על (יכולת התפישה/ההבנה של) האינטלקט האנושי

    מצוות שהנמקותיהן מתעלות את ידיעת האינטלקט האנושי = מצוות שהנמקותיהן מתעלות על (יכולת התפישה/ההבנה של) האינטלקט האנושי

    In bold are my corrections; In bracket it's a supplement that you can accept or omit.

    There is a certain difference in meaning between the two:

    The first claims that the act of rationalize these 'מצוות' is beyond human capacity. The second claims that human can't fathom the reasons for the 'מצוות'.
     
  3. origumi Senior Member

    Hebrew
    מצוות אשר הגיונן הוא מעבר ליכולת ההבנה האנושית
     
  4. Stifled Junior Member

    Hebrew
    The word 'הגיונן' doesn't fin in well. I would translate:

    מצוות שמהותן נשגבת מבינה אנושית - for the most articulate form I can think of. Or:

    מצוות שאינן נתפשות על-ידי חשיבה אנושית - if you're looking to convey your message in speech.
     
  5. airelibre

    airelibre Senior Member

    English - London
    I like all these translations. I see you've used תפישה and נתפשות. Is this the more common form or is the form with samekh instead of sin used equally?
     
  6. origumi Senior Member

    Hebrew
    ???

    See quotations from some good sources:

    תאולוגיה עוסקת בשיטות של הדתות בדרך כלל מתוך הגיונן הפנימי
    אותן התופעות שאת הגיונן אין אנו מבינים
    ברור למדי שהאמונות האלו סותרות זו את זו מבחינת הגיונן הפנימי
    האם לאור הגיונן וחיוניותן של מצוות בני נח לקיום החברה היה צורך "לצוות" את המצוות האלה
    מסע אל מאמרי הליבה במשנת הרב קוק מבקש הפעם להוליך אל הגיונן הפנימי של המצוות
     
  7. Stifled Junior Member

    Hebrew
    It's hard to find a decisive answer (I tried). The choice I made here was a matter of taste, and it was based on the sentence context.

    When you grasp the edge of a blanket - samekh is more common and that would be my first choice.

    When you grasp an idea - you can still use samekh and it's perfectly fine, but you can also use shin, which is a bit more subtle (to my opinion)
    and it helps differentiate between the two. It might has something to do with the archaic language. I think samekh has become more popular these days.
     
  8. Stifled Junior Member

    Hebrew
    So sorry, I should have said it didn't fit in right to my taste or something. I didn't mean that it was incorrect. But I stand beyond my words - It looks bad. (to me)
    No hard feelings I hope. :)
     

Share This Page