1. Awkward1 Senior Member

    Spanish
    Hola, tengo que traducir "Compota de frutas". No sé a qué se refiere exactamente, ya que aparece solo ese producto. Es para la comida de un colegio.

    ¿Como lo traduciríais: Fruit puré, Fruit sauce, Fruit compote o ninguna de las anteriores?

    Me encantaría que me ayudáseis ya que es urgente. Mil gracias.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 23, 2016
  2. mateitop

    mateitop Senior Member

    UK, English
    Fruit compote
     
  3. cyberpedant

    cyberpedant Senior Member

    North Adams, MA
    English USA, Northeast, NYC
    Fruit salad?
     
  4. mateitop

    mateitop Senior Member

    UK, English
    No - compote is a posh word for jam, it's a bit more runny (less viscous) and basically a bit posher.
     
  5. OTELO Senior Member

    español, MADRID
    La compota de frutas es como un puré hecho a base de frutas con azúcar, más ligera que una mermelada. La traducción, mejor la dejo para un nativo.
     
  6. Awkward1 Senior Member

    Spanish
    ¡Muchas gracias a todos! Por favor, si podéis seguid diciéndome vuestras propuestas. Muchas gracias.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 23, 2016
  7. Cubanboy

    Cubanboy Senior Member

    Cuba
    Spanish
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 23, 2016
  8. nellie1973 Senior Member

    Málaga
    Native English (England) and Portuguese
    I agree, for a school menu I'd put "jam" and for a Restaurante de 5 tenedores "compote"... very swish word for jam!!
     
  9. neskatila_27 Member

    Spanish, Spain
    La compota es una especie de macedonia en la que en vez de utilizarse frutas frescas, se usan frutas que se han sometido a un proceso de secado. Normalmente lleva: Pasas, orejones, higos chumbos.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 23, 2016
  10. cyberpedant

    cyberpedant Senior Member

    North Adams, MA
    English USA, Northeast, NYC
    mateitop and OTELO are perfectly correct. The difference between "compote" and "fruit salad" is in the cooking--and possibly the addition of sugar. But I've never heard the word "compote" here in New England. We have a similar dish (but it has a "crust") :
    Betty
    An American dessert that dates back to Colonial American time. A ‘betty’ is a baked pudding, made with layers of sweetened and spiced fruit and buttered bread crumbs. It is usually served with a lemon sauce and/or whipped cream. The most familiar one is the Apple Brown Betty, made with sliced apples and brown sugar.
    Check this link:
    http://www.thefreedictionary.com/compote
     
  11. Cubanboy

    Cubanboy Senior Member

    Cuba
    Spanish
    But ¨jam¨ is also mermelada in Spanish.

    I read this:

    The terms conserves, jelly and jam are used in different parts of the world in different ways. A general rule of thumb is that a jelly contains little or no fruit pulp or seed, while a jam or conserve makes use of the whole fruit.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jam

    I am really confused as to when we should use jam, compote, preserve, etc.
     
  12. Awkward1 Senior Member

    Spanish
    Estoy confundido yo también :S Por varias razones:
    a) Algunos no han escuchado la palabra COMPOTE
    b) JAM es también mermelada, y compota de frutas no es mermelada.

    Seguid opinando por favor :D
     
  13. cyberpedant

    cyberpedant Senior Member

    North Adams, MA
    English USA, Northeast, NYC
    We have several words for cooked and sweetened fruit:

    Jam Pronunciation jaem.
    Definition1.a sweet spread usu. made by cooking crushed fruit and sugar. Synonyms preserves (2) , conserves Crossref. Syn. preserve Similar Words spread , marmalade , jellyBut note that all of these are made with "crushed" (machacada) fruit. In practice, we don't make much difference between these confections. If one were to ask for "jelly," for example, in a restaurant, one would not be upset if the water brought any of the above (although they are somewhat different from one another). You would not substitute a "compote" for "jelly." The compote is eaten as a dish in itself (or perhaps with ice cream), whereas "jam," etc., is usually spread on bread.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 23, 2016
  14. zumac Senior Member

    Mexico City
    USA: English & Spanish
    That's right.
    I have been to several restaurants in the US where they serve hot fruit compote as a side dish, and it's exactly the same as "compota de frutas".

    If someone confuses this with jam, then better change restaurants.

    Saludos.
     
  15. kingkongufulgus

    kingkongufulgus Member

    San Juan, Argentina
    English - United States
    I'd never heard of a "compote" in the Midwest. But, we eat a lot if applesauce, which is definitely "compota de manzana", though we prepare it with different ingredients (lemon juice, water, salt, cinnamon; sugar/honey to taste afterwards) and usually in a crockpot. I've never seen this done with a mix of fruits, and maybe once with just pear
     
  16. paul355915 Senior Member

    Yorkshire, UK
    English - UK
    Fruit compote.

    "Compote" se ha adoptado en inglés del francés. Es igual que COMPOTA en español.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 23, 2016

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