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Congratulations

Discussion in 'Polski (Polish)' started by ics, Aug 6, 2006.

  1. ics Senior Member

    greek/greece
    Hello! :)
    I was wondering how to say <congratulations> to a friend who's recently graduated univercity, possibly in a slang, fluent way, I'd like to surprise her!! :D I don't speak Polish at all...
    thank you!!
     
  2. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
    Hello, :)

    We will try to teach you basic Polish "congratulations" within a moment. :D
    We usually use "gratulacje" [gratoolutsyeh] or "moje gratulacje" [moyeh gratoolatsyeh].
    Sometimes young people use "gratulations" but this is English and won't be good if you want to surprise her with your Polish ;)

    You can type in the words I gave you into the box on this site then click on the red button below the box, and listen to the pronunciation.

    Should you have any further questions, please, do not hestate to ask them.:)

    Tom
     
  3. ics Senior Member

    greek/greece
    Czesc Tomas, thank you for your answer and the link!!

    Yes, I have a question: does moje mean many?

    "dzinkoje"!!:D
     
  4. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
    Cześć Ics,

    Proszę. I can see I've already known some Polish. :) :thumbsup:

    "moje" means my so the whole second phrase reads "my congratulations". We could develop it to "my most sincere congratulations" and it would be "moje najszczersze gratulacje" --this sounds quite warm in Polish but requires more enunciating abilities to our simple pronuciation. ;)

    Tom

    PS: the correct spelling of "dzinkoje" is "dziękuję". Anyway, your version of the spelling sounds pretty cute in Polish. :)
     
  5. ics Senior Member

    greek/greece
    I tried with the link you gave me, it will take me a month to learn how to pronounce it!!! Anyway I like it the most and I only have to write it so that's perfect!!
    Thanks again Thomas! :)
    czesc!

    ps
    I believe that means you are welcome.... :))
     
  6. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
    It's not that difficult..., is it? :)
    If you don't need to say it and just write it on a piece of paper that makes the matters a way more simple,
    Przyjmij moje najszczersze gratulacje. Accept my most sincere congratulations.

    A usual Polish young person would add something like the following: Kiedy oblewamy? this means more or less when are we going to celebrate it (which inseparably is joined with alcohol drinking, at least in most cases ;)).


    Right you are, I am surprised by your command of Polish. :)

    Tom
     
  7. ics, informally, we often say gratki [grutki] :)
     
  8. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
    I don't know it, Majlo, is it a regional usage, by any chance?
     
  9. Little_Me Senior Member

    Poland, Polish
    I heard that few times from my friend who also says quite often "sorki" instead of "sorry" or "przepraszam" and actually I find it funny but a bit childish as well;) IMHO it sounds definitely more 'girly' and I can't imagine any man saying that!:confused::D
     
  10. Well, I don't think so. I think it derives from the Internet usage. I don't know if you visit kurnik.pl, but if so, you are likely to hear gratki when you win a game.
     
  11. ics Senior Member

    greek/greece
    “Kolos dziekuje” for your answers!! You are all very kind!! :)
    I decided for “Moje gratulacje! Kiedy oblewamy?” sounds more “native” and that will definitely surprise my friend!

    Czes’c’ and dobrenight! :D thanks again!!
     

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