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Conjugation of verb: Como

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Grammar / Gramática Español-Inglés' started by NightJay0044, Jul 28, 2006.

  1. NightJay0044

    NightJay0044 Senior Member

    Hi, this is the next part of my learning of verbs. Here is a list of verbs which could use some translations please with possibly further explanaitons if needed. Thank you all.

    como
    comes
    come
    comemos
    coméis
    comen

    I know I have to practice both nouns and verbs to get more of the concepts and understandings. Then I can start putting everything together.

    Jason
     
  2. aleCcowaN Senior Member

    Castellano - Argentina
    Jason, this is not "a list of verb". This is present tense of the verb "comer" (to eat). What is your question?
     
  3. NightJay0044

    NightJay0044 Senior Member

    That's what I didn't know. I'm wondering, what do all of those words mean in Spanish?

    Because I know Como: Means to "like", or I'm not really sure how to use that word, because it's used a lot in my work I believe. Then all the others words below that one on my list in the previous post above.

    I hope this helps...
     
  4. nohablo Senior Member

    English - USA
    I think you're confusing the adverb como with the first-person singular present tense of the verb comer, which is also como. The adverb como can mean "like," as in hablas como un político -- you talk like a politician. But that's not at all the same as como meaning I eat.

    The other words you quoted in your original message were other parts of the present-tense conjugation of the verb comer.

    Oops--I see that mhp has already made much the same point, so I won't bother continuing to explain the verb comer. However, if you're still confused, let us know.
     
  5. NightJay0044

    NightJay0044 Senior Member

    Alright, I'll give this trial a shot. What about this Spanish sentence?

    Yo no como.

    Did I say "I didn't eat yet?"

    or something along those lines?
     
  6. Gargoyle Senior Member

    Spanish-Spain
    Yo no como = I don´t eat. As aleCcowan said before, it´s the present tense of the verb, so you cannot translate it like a past.
     
  7. saturnian New Member

    Saturn - English
    "I didn't eat yet" would be "Aún/todavía no he comido" (Spain) or "Aún/todavía no comí" (LatAm).
     
  8. NightJay0044

    NightJay0044 Senior Member

    Alright, I'm not learning properly here. I need to learn the word "como" in a right manner. From my understanding that means "like" when talking to another person in expression? Or can someone please further explain this to me, so I can fully learn this verb or adverb?

    Well, let's start with the verb "como". Can someone please explain again this word and how it's used and all in simple tenses so I dont get hindered from learning?

    Thanks..
     
  9. Gargoyle Senior Member

    Spanish-Spain
  10. NightJay0044

    NightJay0044 Senior Member

    it's kind of making more sense to me now. I'll start with a couple of those phases/words there to get my understanding of that chart. That pasting didn't work too well, oops try again here.okay
    These two words I'll start with..

    "como" and "comes"

    Como: means I eat, am and eating....

    Do I follow that right?

    So if I were to say this: "Estoy como" means: "I'm eating" in spanish?
     
  11. saturnian New Member

    Saturn - English
    Hi,

    "Como" is not a verb. The verb (infinitive) is "comer" (to eat), and "como" is this verb conjugated in the first person, present tense (i.e. "I eat).

    For the full list of conjugations of this verb see...the page that Gargoyle mentioned.

    As he also said, "como" (nothing to do with the conjugated form of the verb comer, "como") is also an adverb that can mean "like" or "as"...

    A couple of examples with this adverb:

    Yo quiero ser como tú - I want to be like you

    No es tan fácil como las otras cosas - It isn't as easy as the other things

    Whereas (as a conjugated verb):

    Como pan = I eat bread
     
  12. saturnian New Member

    Saturn - English
    "I am eating" is "estoy comiendo".

    To learn more about the present progressive tense in Spanish, see here:

    studyspanish.com/lessons/presprog.htm
     
  13. NightJay0044

    NightJay0044 Senior Member

    Alright, so I want to get this word down, because my goal tonight is to learn 3 spanish verbs..

    The Spanish word "como" is not a verb, it is an adverb which is conjugated from the verb "como"?

    Did I get that right?
     
  14. Gargoyle Senior Member

    Spanish-Spain
    Yo como ....I eat
    tú comes... you eat
    él come ....he or she eats
    nosotros comemos...we eat
    vosotros coméis-...you eat
    ellos comen....they eat
    ........................

    yo estoy comiendo .... i am eating
    tú estás comiendo...you are eating
    él/ella está comiendo...he/she is eating...
    nosotros estamos comiendo...we are eating
    vosotros estáis comiendo...you are eating
    ellos estan comiendo...they are eating

    In the chart, both are together because they have more or less the same meaning in Spanish. But with the form "i am eating" yo are more implicit, you are doing it NOW.
     
  15. saturnian New Member

    Saturn - English
    As in English, in Spanish there are (a few) words that are written the same but which don't have anything to do with each other. This is one of those cases.

    "Como" (conjugated form of the verb "comer") and "como" (the adverb/conjunction/preposition) are completely different words.

    See the sentences I gave above for some examples (or look in the WordReference dictionary under "como" for more info).
     
  16. aleCcowaN Senior Member

    Castellano - Argentina
    There is a difference.

    I eat meat = Como carne
    He eats at twelve = Él come a las doce
    They are eating now = Ellos/Ellas están comiendo ahora
    Don't disturb me while I am eating = No me molestes mientras como.
     
  17. Gargoyle Senior Member

    Spanish-Spain
    Well, so I don´t know how to explain it better. I think she should buy a grammar book in which the explanations will be perfect.
     
  18. NightJay0044

    NightJay0044 Senior Member

    Alright, lets try to put this to some use here..I'll start with this phrase that "gargoyle" used:

    yo estoy comiendo .... i am eating....

    That means "I am eating" can you just switch these words around if you wanted to? Such as:

    estoy yo comiendo

    Which means: "am I eating?" Can you reverse or change it like that? To make it into a question..

    Thanks..
     
  19. mhp Senior Member

    American English
    Perfect recommendation. It will even explain the difference between “deja que coma”, “la coma” y “el coma”. :)
     
  20. NightJay0044

    NightJay0044 Senior Member

    Alright, well just to get this point to your quote, in the quote I read the word "she" was that refering to another person in the forums or me? Because Iam a he....

    But can I switch those words around like i did in the previous post above?
     
  21. NightJay0044

    NightJay0044 Senior Member

    Also, what am I saying when I say this in spanish?

    Yo como ahora?
     
  22. Gargoyle Senior Member

    Spanish-Spain
    Oops sorry, I meant "he":p

    ¿yo como ahora? Do I eat now?
     
  23. NightJay0044

    NightJay0044 Senior Member

    To follow this sentence....How does "yo" get turned into "do I"? Because isn't the word "yo" mean "i" translated to english?
     
  24. NightJay0044

    NightJay0044 Senior Member

    Alright, well I think I might get the spanish word "como" confused with the other spanish word "como" because "como" means "to eat" and it also means "like"...So I'm not sure if I will confuse the spanish people at my work by saying this in spanish:

    Yo como ahora: which means "do I eat now?"

    I'm thinking that they could also think of it as "I like now"...See where I'm coming from here?
     
  25. nohablo Senior Member

    English - USA
    Jason, I think that for the moment, you should forget about como as an adverb meaning "like." Concentrate instead on understanding verbs, and how verbs work in Spanish. In English, the form of the verb doesn't usually change very much. If you say "I eat," "you eat," "we eat," or "they eat," the verb stays the same: eat. It changes only if you use the third-person singular: he or she. Then the verb changes from eat to eats. We know who is doing the eating because of the pronoun: I, you, we, they, etc.

    In Spanish, the verb changes a lot more than it does in English. As you know by now, the verb "to eat" in Spanish is comer. If you want to say "I eat" you can say "yo como" or just "como." We can tell who is eating just by looking at the verb. "Como" means "I eat." If you want to say "you eat," you say "tú comes." Tú = you, and comes = eat. Because each verb form is distinctive, you can drop the pronoun (tú) and just say "comes," and everyone will understand that you're saying "you eat." Similarly, "he eats" is "él come" or just "come." "We eat" is "nosotros comemos" or just "comemos." The reason you can use just the verb (comemos) without the pronoun (nosotros) is that comemos is used only to mean WE eat. You can't use "comemos" to mean "I eat" or "you eat," only "we eat."

    So, getting back to "como," "como" means "I eat." If you want to say you eat, he eats, we eat, or they eat, you have to change the spelling of the verb comer. In other words, you have to conjugate the verb.
    That's what you were doing in your first message, though you may not have realized it:

    como -- I eat
    comes -- you (singular familiar) eat
    come -- he/she eats
    comemos -- we eat
    coméis -- you (plural familiar) eat
    comen -- they eat

    If you want to learn Spanish, you have to learn how to conjugate verbs. Most verbs follow a pattern, and you have to learn the pattern and then learn which verbs do not follow the pattern.

    Once you understand how Spanish verbs work, you can turn your attention to the fact that como can also be an adverb that means like or as. But first learn about the verbs.

    I hope some of this helps.
     
  26. mariente Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    Español, Argentina (somewhere in the planet Urban)
    I= yo, no other possiblity.
    In spanish many times you dont need to use the pronoun because its understood by the conjugation of the verb and sometimes can be redundant.
    If you want to translate: do i eat now? the translation to spanish is ¿como ahora?
     
  27. NightJay0044

    NightJay0044 Senior Member

    Alright, that's understandable..But with what you put the sentence "como ahora?"

    Do you think that the spanish people could get that confused with thinking that could mean "like now?"
     
  28. mariente Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    Español, Argentina (somewhere in the planet Urban)
    No, because the stress is different (tonic accent) I mean the intonation. If you want to say ¿cómo ahora? (eat) you stress the first o in como. If you want to say like now it goes in Cómo ahóra? this is just for entonation, you dont have to write it. No written accent. 1st O in Como and O in ahora
     
  29. nohablo Senior Member

    English - USA
    Yes, you will confuse other people because you are confused. You don't seem to know the difference between a verb and an adverb. In one of your earlier messages, you said "The Spanish word "como" is not a verb, it is an adverb which is conjugated from the verb "como." Jason, adverbs are not conjugated from verbs. You're going to have a hard time understanding the explanations people are offering you if you don't understand the terms they're using: verbs, adverbs, conjugation, etc. I strongly urge you to follow the advice someone else provided earlier: get a good grammar book. In fact, you might find it helpful to get an English grammar book as well as a Spanish grammar book.

    To answer one of your questions quoted above, "Yo como ahora" means "I eat now." If you put question marks around that sentence (¿Yo como ahora?), you could translate it as "Am I eating now?" But you CANNOT translate "yo como ahora" as "I like now." Here, again, you're handicapped by not understanding the difference between a verb and an adverb.
     
  30. NightJay0044

    NightJay0044 Senior Member

    so if you say the o in the first word of the sentence "como ahora" with as soft voice you mean dont stress it, that's where they will tell the difference?

    Also, Cómo ahora...that is the first "ó" in that word, that means: "Do I eat now?" but if I want to say "like now" in spanish you say "como ahóra?"..which the last word indicates "like now"..

    Did I follow that correctly? Then how would you say that and stress that if you wanted to speak that and have the spanish speaker understand that?
     
  31. mariente Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    Español, Argentina (somewhere in the planet Urban)
    If you stress only the o in ahora, you mean like now. Me gusta estar como ahóra. I like to be like now. With the stress thing i ve told you are going to be understood the way you want
    ps: you can stress as i said before the two words to mean like now if you are asking a question. I forgot to tell you that, sorry. Se fue ahora ¿Cómo ahóra? remember this is not a written accent
     
  32. NightJay0044

    NightJay0044 Senior Member

    Nohablo~
    Hi, thanks for the advice..I know what I'm doing might seem over my head. But this is what I have to learn since I want to learn spanish..Also My english grammar is in somewhat fair conditions but it's not in good conditions..

    I know this can cause confusion...but everything that Iam doing can and will be done as long as I have the right mind set and attitude...So bare with me through all this for whomever reads this post. I'm also taking night classes on English, Science and math to get all my knowledge up to the level desired for me...

    I have a lot of knowledge to keep up on...Always should be with me what can be done...instead of what not can be done...Also want to point out I'm not trying to go across or against your previous post here. I'm just stating my position in my journey of learning knowledge..

    A thank you for all who help me in the future...
     
  33. nohablo Senior Member

    English - USA
    Following up on my previous message, I'd like to mention a specific grammar book that several people have mentioned enthusiastically in other forums. It's called English Grammar for Students of Spanish by Emily Spinelli. It's now in a 5th edition that's available from Amazon.com, but the 4th edition is also listed by Amazon, and they list it as available used for as little as $2.91 plus postage. I have not seen or used this book, but most of the reviews on Amazon are very favorable, and several people have mentioned it enthusiastically either in person or on other forums. Here's a link to the 4th edition:
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0934034303/sr=1-2/qid=1153932221/ref=pd_bbs_2/102-4268392-5661752?redirect=true&ie=UTF8&s=books
    On this page, you can "look inside the book" and see the table of contents as well as an excerpt, so you can decide whether it seems like a book you'd find helpful.
     
  34. mariente Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    Español, Argentina (somewhere in the planet Urban)
  35. NightJay0044

    NightJay0044 Senior Member

    Alright, I'm not following clearly here on this adverb of "como"..Before when I used this sentence

    Como Ahora

    Which means "do I eat now"..You can put it in two different ways from my understanding..here are the two different ways..

    Cómo ahora / como ahóra

    Now the first one has the accent mark in the first word and second one has it in the second word. I'm just not sure how I can know the difference in those two. Because to me, if i say that to a spanish person at my work.

    I could say "Do I eat now?" or I think I could say to them "Like now"..So I'm not really sure how that works if someone could explain and help me understand..Thanks..
     
  36. NightJay0044

    NightJay0044 Senior Member

    Alright, I'm not following clearly here on this adverb of "como"..Before when I used this sentence

    Como Ahora

    Which means "do I eat now"..You can put it in two different ways from my understanding..here are the two different ways..

    Cómo ahora / como ahóra

    Now the first one has the accent mark in the first word and second one has it in the second word. I'm just not sure how I can know the difference in those two. Because to me, if i say that to a spanish person at my work.

    I could say "Do I eat now?" or I think I could say to them "Like now"..So I'm not really sure how that works if someone could explain and help me understand..Thanks..
     
  37. mariente Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    Español, Argentina (somewhere in the planet Urban)
    I guess you dont have the concept very clear, why dont you re try and read it again?
     
  38. NightJay0044

    NightJay0044 Senior Member

    Alright, I'm not sure how to stress the "O's" to make them so the native speakers understand me.

    The first sentece is this: "Cómo ahóra?"/Do I eat now
    The second sentence is this: "cómo ahora?"/Like now

    Which I hope I got those right..How do you stress those two so that a person may understand you?

    I'm not familar with how to use the stress and the sound of your voice.
     
  39. nohablo Senior Member

    English - USA
    Jason, first of all, for the most part, mariente was not talking about
    written accents, she was talking about where you put the stress when
    you speak. "Como ahora" means "I eat now." In English, if you say "I
    EAT now" (with the stress on EAT), you're making a statement. You can
    say the same words, however, but make them into a question simply by
    putting the stress on a different word and having your voice go up at
    the end rather than down: "I eat NOW?" By doing something similar in Spanish,
    you can also turn "Como ahora" ("I eat now") into
    "¿Como ahora?" ("I eat now?" or "Do I eat now?").

    As for how someone will know whether you mean como as a verb (as in
    "como ahora" - "I eat now") or como as an adverb (as in your example
    of "como ahora" - "like now"), the answer is that people can tell from
    the context
    . In English, the same thing is true. Even though "seen"
    and "scene" sound the same, you can tell from the context which word
    some is using: "Have you seen Maria? No, I haven't seen her" or "Did you
    like the movie? Yes, but I thought the first scene was confusing."
     
  40. mariente Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    Español, Argentina (somewhere in the planet Urban)
    Thats right. And if you want no question you say.
    como ahóra like now

    and yo cómo ahóra = I eat now . Without saying the question mark
     
  41. Jellby

    Jellby Senior Member

    Spanish (Spain)
    "¿Cómo como? Como como como" -> How do I eat? I eat the way I eat.
     

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