contact me on/at this telephone number

Discussion in 'English Only' started by tablecloth, Mar 2, 2008.

  1. tablecloth Senior Member

    Madrid
    Spanish
    Hello everyone!
    I'd be really grateful if you could please help me to know if the preposition "on" can be used in the sententence "Please, contact me on this telephone number" and should it be right, could you please tell me in which parts of the English speaking world it is used?
    I've always had problems with the prepositions used with phone: you buy tickts over the phone, have someone on the phone and then you contact someone at a telephone number, but I am almost sure "on" can also be used in that contex and I would really like to know for certain.
    Many, many thanks.
     
  2. katie_here Senior Member

    England
    England/English
    Hi Tablecloth,

    I don't think it is right to say "contact someone at a telephone number". To me it should be contact on. Not sure how to explain it fully, but "at" would indicate you are going to a place, or a destination, but "on" means via, so you would contact someone via (on) a telephone number, or contact them at their home address.

    Does this make sense?
     
  3. sdgraham

    sdgraham Senior Member

    Oregon, USA
    USA English
    We (AE) normally say a person is at a telephone number. When you connect, however, you will be talking on the telephone.
     
  4. KHS

    KHS Senior Member

    Yes, call me AT a specific phone number. However, you can say, "Call me ON my cell phone."
     
  5. tablecloth Senior Member

    Madrid
    Spanish
    So, to sum up, ot seems that people from the States prefer "at" and people from Great Britain prefer "on". However, that last post by KHS raised a new quesstion. Can you say "Contact me on my home number"?
    Thank you very much. :)
     
  6. katie_here Senior Member

    England
    England/English
    I would say contact me on my home number.

    I would also say "contact me on my mobile" ;)
     
  7. KHS

    KHS Senior Member

    For AE me, it's more common to say, "Call me on my home phone," but it *does* seem less strange to use 'on' when you put that extra word between 'on' and 'number.'

    Karen
     
  8. snorklebum

    snorklebum Senior Member

    Mexico
    Mexico English
    AE as noted is much give to "at" At home, at work, at the bar, at this number.

    "On" this number is not heard at all.

    Things change, in the twenties people used "call me along the telephone" or "over the phone" but that's very archaic.
     
  9. It's on every time in the UK.

    Call me on the/my landline.
    Call me on the mobile.

    I can be contacted on 0123456789.
    Call me on 02233445566.

    She's on the other phone, I'll get her to ring you back.

    I hate talking on the phone.
     
  10. tablecloth Senior Member

    Madrid
    Spanish
    Thank you all very much indeed. I think you should consider reducing the use of prepositions, in fact they are not so relevant and they are a real nightmare for foreigners! ;)
     
  11. KHS

    KHS Senior Member

    Hmmm... I sometimes still say "I talked to her over the phone," although I wouldn't say, "I called her over the phone." (There seems to be more redundancy in the latter.)
     
  12. sdgraham

    sdgraham Senior Member

    Oregon, USA
    USA English
    One cannot even compose a rule regarding communications. Although we in AE say "call me at (number)," two-way radio communications are different.

    Air traffic control says things like "contact ground control on 121.8" (VHF radio frequency)

    (As for your suggestion, I'll work on cleaning up English prepositions if you will get rid of the Spanish subjunctive.)
     
  13. Forero Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA English
    A telephone number can be thought of as an address, but not a device that responds to that number:

    Call me at home in Briarwood.
    Call me at this number.
    Call me on my cel phone.
    You can give me that information over the phone.
     
  14. tablecloth Senior Member

    Madrid
    Spanish
    Thank you all again :)
     
  15. bamboo13 Junior Member

    Vietnamese
    For further information, you can contact me on/ at the phone (04) 9 838 188 or the email: whoever@whatever.com <<email address deleted, just in case it's a real one>>
    Which preposition is the most suitable in this sentence? Thank you very much!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 6, 2013
  16. ewhite

    ewhite Senior Member

    USA/English
    I would say "You can call me at 212-blah-blah-blah," or "You can reach me at 212-blah-blah-blah."
     
  17. chfattouma

    chfattouma Senior Member

    Doha, Qatar
    Tunisian Arabic
    'on' is also right, but at is much more commonly used in this context.

    https://books.google.com/ngrams/gra...is number;,c0;.t1;,call me on this number;,c0
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 6, 2013
  18. Sparky Malarky

    Sparky Malarky Senior Member

    Indiana
    English - US
    You can call me on the phone at [number].
     
  19. sdgraham

    sdgraham Senior Member

    Oregon, USA
    USA English

    Your problem is that we don't say "the phone (04) 9 838 188" or "the email: whoever@whatever.com"

    (04) 9 838 188 is not a phone, it's a phone number.
    whoever@whatever.com is not an e-mail, it's an e-mail address.

    See previous discussion.

    write me an e-mail on

    Post No. 2 is correct. No 3. is not because of the above.

    you can contact me on/ at the phone (04) 9 838 188 :tick: (either one)

    you can contact me on/ at the phone (04) 9 838 188 or the email:
    whoever@whatever.com :tick:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 7, 2013
  20. Parla Senior Member

    New York City
    English - US
    You can phone me at ____________ or e-mail me at ____________.
     
  21. natkretep

    natkretep Moderato con anima

    Singapore
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Moderator note: bamboo's thread (beginning with post 15) has been merged with an earlier one. Please scroll up.
     
  22. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
    This is what a native speaker of American English might say. (Thank you, Sparky. It's very useful. :thumbsup:)
    Would the British English equivalent be:
    You can call me on the phone on [number].
     
  23. DonnyB

    DonnyB Senior Member

    Coventry, UK
    English UK Southern Standard English
    I rather doubt it: "call me" and "on the phone" sound to me to be saying the same thing twice.
    I'd just say "You can phone me on [number].
     
  24. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
    You can call someone on the computer, for example. I'm interested in which prepostions you would use, would the following be OK in BE:
    "You can phone/call me on my mobile on [number]."
     
  25. DonnyB

    DonnyB Senior Member

    Coventry, UK
    English UK Southern Standard English
    I'm not sure you need a preposition. "You can phone me on my mobile [number].", or even just "You can phone my mobile [number]." both sound natural to me.
     

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