convalidar una asignatura

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by Fairies, Mar 11, 2009.

  1. Fairies

    Fairies Senior Member

    Chile
    Español
    Hola a todos,
    Aquí les dejo un contexto y mi intento. Agradezco cualquier ayuda :)

    Esta carrera tuvo una duración de 8 semestres lectivos. Al Señor X se le convalidaron 5 asignaturas al ingresar a la carrera el año 2000.

    "This major is 8 academic semesters long. When entering the major in 2000, Mr. X validated 5 subjects in his curriculum.

    ¿Opiniones? ¿Sugerencias?(Por favoooor:D)
     
  2. Oldy Nuts

    Oldy Nuts Senior Member

    Santiago, Chile
    Spanish - Chile
  3. Fairies

    Fairies Senior Member

    Chile
    Español
    Ok, gracias. Ya había leído los temas anteriores, pero aún así tengo mis dudas. Por otro lado me gustaría que me ayudaran con el resto de la oración también, no sólo con la palabra.
    Gracias.
     
  4. djkingdanny Senior Member

    Lima, Peru
    Peru/Spanish
    I would translate it into... This career lasted 8 academic semesters. They recognized 5 subjects to Mr X, when starting the new career in 2000.

    Me parece que falta un poco mas de información. Además ten cuidado con tu traducción, en especial, con los tiempos.

    Esta carrera tuvo una duración de 8 semestres lectivos. Al Señor X se le convalidaron 5 asignaturas al ingresar a la carrera el año 2000.

    "This major is 8 academic semesters long. When entering the major in 2000, Mr. X validated 5 subjects in his curriculum.
     
  5. PiketteInWordland Member

    LA and Spain Spanish- UK English
    En inglés, una carrera (universitaria) no es "career" sino "course".
     
  6. galesa Senior Member

    mallorca
    english wales
    My try:
    This course had a duration of 8 school semesters. Mr X had 5 subjects validated in order to enter the course in 2000.
     
  7. vikingo45 Member

    Costa Rica
    Costa Rica - English
    I would like to jump in here and offer a correction to Pikette in Wordland and Galesa (who fell into the same trap).
    "Course" in English is just like "curso" in Spanish. For "carrera", which usually implies a number of courses, a much better term is "Major". Career is usually what you get into after you finish the University. So the terms used by Faries are correct, but his tenses, probably could be better.
    "Convalidaron" could be "Recognized" or "Validated", depending on the University system.
    So the original sentene could perghaps be improved as :

    "This major was 8 academic semesters long. When entering the major in 2000, Mr. X had 5 subjects validated in his curriculum.

    And I take the opportunity to wish all Foreros a very Merry Christmas.
     
  8. Pi_Ñacolada Member

    Spain
    Spanish - Spain
    Hi!!!

    I actually have a question about this. Would it be ok to use "degree"? Most of the times, when people ask me in English about my studies, I talk about my "degree" because here in Spain the major&minor don't exist (i.e. The degree had a duration of 8 academic semesters). I don't know if this is entirely correct. Thanks
     
  9. Amapolas

    Amapolas Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    Castellano rioplatense
    Yo pondría algo como "the course of studies had a duration of..." porque degree es el título que obtienes al final de la carrera y no la carrera en sí.
     
  10. pachanga7 Senior Member

    Southeastern U.S.
    U.S. English
    Hello,

    Sometimes we might say "degree" to refer to the "carrera" but it would depend on the context, because as Amapolas says, it can also mean the object/qualification once obtained: I am studying for a degree in chemistry. This degree requires a great deal of labwork.

    I would probably say degree, major, or, "course of study" for "carrera."

    Honestly, I still don't understand what "convalidar" means in this context. Is it just like signing up for the class, or is it something that happens after you finish the class?
     
  11. vikingo45 Member

    Costa Rica
    Costa Rica - English
    Hi Pachanga7, "convalidar" is when you arrive in University "B" from university "A" with a bunch of courses taken in university "A" and you don't want to do the coursework all over again, so you try to get as many of those courses "convalidados" by university "B" as being similar enough to univ. B's courses so that you don't have to take them again. Usually it involves a process of the Registrar from univ B studying the univ A course curriculum and description. Then the Registrar at univ. B may allow those courses to appear on your transcript and accept (or not) the credits involved. That way you don't have to take them again.

    Here is a Registrar's description of the process that I recently translated: (it may or may not make things clearer, however) :-(

    "The courses with an “RE” (Transfer Credit Recognised) under the Status column are those whose credits have been accepted because their content and description are homologous with those granyed by Univ XXX. The courses with “CE” (Validated) in the Status column are those whose credits have been accepted in substitution to those required within the academic curriculum, although the description and content are not homologous to those granted by Univ XXX. Those courses that include an “RI” or “CI” in the Status column are courses recognised or validated internally due to a change in major."

    Sometimes it looks like the universities aren't too sure about it either ;-)
     
  12. pachanga7 Senior Member

    Southeastern U.S.
    U.S. English
    Ah, that makes sense now. "Validate" which was suggested by several forum members above does not make sense to me. Yes, apparently it can be a laborious process.

    The student may receive transfer credits for a particular course (class).
    The student may be granted transfer credit for a particular course (class).

    Also, the university may grant transfer credits to the student.

    The original example is a little trickier because it refers to "5 asignaturas" instead of credits, and the student could be granted several credits for each "asignatura." I would say "Mr. X received transfer credit for five courses at the start of his course of studies in 2000." Or "Mr. X was granted transfer credit for five courses...."
     
  13. pachanga7 Senior Member

    Southeastern U.S.
    U.S. English
    Hi Pi_Ñacolada,

    The most usual way we would say this in the US is something like "I have a four-year degree in Industrial Design." If you haven't graduated yet, you can say "I am studying for a four-year degree in Industrial Design" or "I am in my third year of a four-year Political Sciences degree" or "I am in my first year of a four-year degree in Mathematics."

    Also, "I have a Bachelor's degree in Music Theory" or "I am studying for my Bachelor's (degree) in Industrial Design" (this word "Bachelor's" implies four years (eight semesters) of post-secondary studies, and applies only if you are eligible to study for the degree with only a high school diploma).
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2015
  14. vikingo45 Member

    Costa Rica
    Costa Rica - English
    Hi Pachanga7,
    Sounds good. Instead of Bachelor's, you can also say undergraduate or undergrad degree.

    Bachelor's Degree also is Baccalaureate, but....
    Here in Costa Rica the Educational System grants a Bachillerato for Secondary Education or High School. In this sense, so does the British System with the Baccalaureate Exam before college (higher education) admissions. So we have to be careful to specify whether it is a secondary or higher education "Baccalaureate".

    The other can of worms is the "Licenciatura", or Licentiate, which is definitely not an MA or MS, but is beyond a Bachelor's Degree. And then, all the Attorneys- Notaries Public here use it as a title: Lic. (Licenciado), the only way I've found to get around this in English is to dote them with the typical U.S. attorney's "Esq."

    Any thoughts on that?
     
  15. Pi_Ñacolada Member

    Spain
    Spanish - Spain
    Thank you very much for answering in detail! :) It's a helpful explanation and clear!:thumbsup:
     
  16. pachanga7 Senior Member

    Southeastern U.S.
    U.S. English
    Oh, good point viking45, about the various uses of similar terms: "bachillerato" to mean a high school diploma, and the "Baccalaureate exam" in Britain. When I suggested "Bachelor's degree" as an option I was thinking of the US in particular, where it means a four-year post-secondary degree. Perhaps it's best to stick to saying "four-year degree" although if Pi is in Britain s/he might wish to consult speakers in the area for the term most likely to be understood.
     
  17. kidika

    kidika Senior Member

    Península Ibérica
    Castellano de Castilla
    Hola!
    No he leído todos los mensajes porque hay algunos que no tratan del tema que titula este hilo, pero creo que la idea de convalidar no está explicada bien del todo.
    Convalidar es dar por hechas ciertas asignaturas, a veces independientemente de si se han estudiado antes o en otro sitio o no. Por ejemplo, en Bachillerato, al menos donde yo vivo, se puede convalidar una asignatura de las optativas (pongamos Psicología) si se están cursando 4°, 5° o 6° de Enseñanzas Profesionales de Danza o de Música (en ninguno de estos dos estudios existe la asignatura de Psicología).
    O sea, covalidar es básicamente eximir de ciertas asignaturas a los alumnos que lo soliciten y puedan justificarlo según la "legislación" de ese lugar, por decirlo de alguna manera.

    I'll summarize that above a little bit.
    "Convalidar" is basically allow students not to study some subjects, because they've already studied them somewhere else, or because they are studying something that is legislated as "validatable". Over here in Bachillerato (High School or whatever) you can "convalidar" an optional subject, such as Psychology "con"/by? a completely different set of subjects, such as "Official" Professional Dance or Music Studies.
    So how would that be translated by?
    Puedo convalidar la asignatura de Psicología con los estudios del Conservatorio.
    I can validate Psychology "with?" "by?" Music?

    Thanks everyone.
     
  18. pachanga7 Senior Member

    Southeastern U.S.
    U.S. English
    Hi kidika. This is what comes immediately to mind for your specific situation:

    to be exempt from
    to fulfill a requirement by taking
    to substitute some courses for others

    I can "get out of taking" (be exempt from) Psychology by taking courses in the Performing Arts.
    I can fulfill the Psychology requirement by taking classes in Dance and Music.

    I have also seen, in other contexts for "convalidar":

    to earn credits
    to earn academic credit for
    to have (a diploma, your qualifications) officially recognized

    Saludos.
     

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