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  1. beacea Junior Member

    montevideo, uruguay
    spanish uruguay
    Convivialidad es un neologismo dentro de una ciencia que estudia como vivir mejor, entre otras cosas, y significa la calidad de nuestra convivencia o de nuestra habilidad para convivir y relacionarnos con los demás en forma sana.

    Mi pregunta tiene dos partes:

    1. Cómo proceder como regla general con los neologismos? Dejándolos en lengua original (Convivialidad means the quality of ...etc) o creándolo en el idioma de destino de la traducción (Coexistenality means the quality of our ...) ?


    2. Específicamente en este caso, convivencia se podría traducir como coexistence?
     
  2. Dlyons

    Dlyons Senior Member

    Dublin
    English - Ireland
    2. Si, pero convivencia no es un neologismo.

    1. Yo no traduciría Convivialidad.
     
  3. beacea Junior Member

    montevideo, uruguay
    spanish uruguay
    Claro, convivencia no es neologismo, pero sí convivialidad; lo cual me plantea una doble dificultad: la palabra convivencia que en realidad no es exactamente coexistence, sumado a la dificultad del neologismo que es:

    convivencia + calidad = convivialidad


    Inventar algo así en inglés me parece muy forzado : coexistence + quality = coexistenality / coexistencenality ???

    what do you think?
     
  4. Dlyons

    Dlyons Senior Member

    Dublin
    English - Ireland
    I agree that either of the English neologisms sound forced, so I'd be inclined to use convivialidad untranslated (with an explanation on first use). The only reservation I have about that is that it suggests "conviviality" in English rather than "coexistence".
     
  5. beacea Junior Member

    montevideo, uruguay
    spanish uruguay
    Thanks, Dlyons!

    I was not sure if the word conviviality existed, but doesn´t it mean fond of feasting and drinking? :confused:

    What is meant here in the context I'm working is to live peacefully and get along well with others in a healthy way; respect, good relationships... but nothing like partying frantically!!! hahaha:D
     
  6. Dlyons

    Dlyons Senior Member

    Dublin
    English - Ireland
    Yes, that's why I have a reservation about convivialid - the first connotation an English speaker would think of is very different from what you want to convey. You can use convivialid to mean whatever you like but it will come with that unwanted attachment!
     
  7. beacea Junior Member

    montevideo, uruguay
    spanish uruguay
    yeah, i see what you mean now.

    i think that the options we make as translators depend on what we want to privilege. In this particular case it is very important to preserve the positive meaning of the concept, so i prefer to stick to coexistence.

    thanks a lot, Dlyons!!!
     
  8. Forero Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA English
    Wow. I just looked up convivial in my dictionary. I never knew it had that connotation. I have heard it in English since I was a child and always thought it meant "friendly", "agreeable", and "getting along well".

    Live and learn.
     
  9. beacea Junior Member

    montevideo, uruguay
    spanish uruguay
    Interesting!

    i didn't know either, i just looked it up when Dlyons suggested the word.

    I think languages evolve in that way, ppl start using words with a different connotation. That causes us non-natives a lot of trouble! But on the other hand, isn't it great that by learning other languages, one gets to improve the command of our own?
     
  10. Forero Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA English
    That works for me learning Spanish, German, and Greek, but to learn French well, I would have to spend days with a very large dictionary (the kind that doesn't take anything for granted). :) The problem with French for an English speaker is that most of English vocabulary is Anglo-French, which looks like French and is similar to French but makes Canadian French identical to Parisian French by comparison.

    I really feel the dictionaries are wrong about convivial. I just looked it up in my big dictionary and see that it has both meanings, but the feasting and drinking one is first. I know I've heard it to mean jovial, so maybe they just have the wrong definition first. ;)
     

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