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  1. Aidasp Junior Member

    Wrexham
    Spain
    hola

    como diriais en ingles que una persona no sabe convivir?

    Podria ser algo asi:

    "She dosen't live togheter"

    Garcias
     
  2. Reina140

    Reina140 Senior Member

    USA--English
    She doesn't live with anyone or She lives alone, maybe . . . or She doesn't have a roommate
     
  3. Mirlo

    Mirlo Senior Member

    Missouri
    Castellano, Panamá/ USA
    "he/she does'nt know how to get along/coexist"
    saludos,
     
  4. Sallyb36

    Sallyb36 Senior Member

    Liverpool UK
    British UK
    doesn't know how to live with somebody else/ doesn't know how to give and take.
     
  5. karaz23 New Member

    MEXICALI-MEXICO
    espanish
    Como Se Dice En Ingles 'convivir En Familia'
     
  6. parhuzam Senior Member

    Los Angeles,CA
    USA/English/Español
    ¿Como Se Dice En Ingles 'convivir En Familia' ?

    Try:

    "live/thrive in a family group...."

    lo opuesto.... " dysfunctional within the family...."
     
  7. Mirlo

    Mirlo Senior Member

    Missouri
    Castellano, Panamá/ USA
    convivir verbo intransitivo
    1 (en la misma casa) to live together
    2 figurado to coexist [con, with

    Saludos,
     
  8. parhuzam Senior Member

    Los Angeles,CA
    USA/English/Español
    Hola Mirlo,

    To coexist is to live and thrive within a family group...We are saying the same thing. I don't think it is just the physical part of living together. You can have adherence to the family group and develop as an individual.

    Saludos.
     
  9. Mirlo

    Mirlo Senior Member

    Missouri
    Castellano, Panamá/ USA
    You know what, I read this really fast and I though you were asking. I'm sorry, but thanks,
    Saludos,
     
  10. pausa

    pausa Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    Argentina español
    I have always thought that the english for convivir was to cohabit. isn't it right?
     
  11. alexander01 Junior Member

    Caribe Mexicano
    UK English
    I would say that cohabiting has a special implication, that it is a couple living together also that they are unmarried.

    Coexist is not such a usual usage for people living together, except when changed into noun form and used as follows: theirs was a peaceful coexistence - when refering to a couple. Otherwise, there is a strong implication of there being no connection between the two or more people living together - eg a fox, various cats, an owl and a family of mice coexisted in the house.

    As I read it in Mexican Spanish - convivencia is a lot more emotionally laden that mere living together. It expresses something of "togetherness".
    Alex
     
  12. littleboots New Member

    Mexican Spanish
    Would you say there is no word in english equivalent to convivir in the context of the mexican meaning?
    I'm translating this sentence:

    Durante la semana pasada usted convivió con familiares, amigos o conocidos, asistió a fiestas o atendió visitas?

    I think the word coexist is a bit technical. The question comes in a survey's section about emotional support and care to household members.

    I hope someone can help,

    Thank you!
     
  13. Sandym Senior Member

    U.S.A
    Spanish Modern Sort
    How about the verb interact?
     
  14. Scheieian Senior Member

    Seattle, WA
    US English
    Would it make sense to say "spend time together?" I'm translating recommendations letters for immigration cases, typically written by speakers of Mexican and Central American Spanish living in the U.S., and I keep running into the word "convivir".

    For example: "Son personas responsables y de buen caracter moral y familiar, ya que los conozco por más de 15 años y he convivido con ellos de cerca en los últimos 4 años."

    Sometimes it's clear that people actually live in the same house, but other times I think they mean something else. Your example is good, because it lumps convivir with family/friends/parties/visits, i.e. spending time with people. Or am I just making up a meaning that isn't there?
     
  15. EddieZumac

    EddieZumac Senior Member

    Mexico City
    English/Spanish
    "Convivir" ===> sharing something, mostly a life, together.
     
  16. Mirlo

    Mirlo Senior Member

    Missouri
    Castellano, Panamá/ USA
    Before I wasn't sure, but after careful examination I think that the closest thing to convivir in English is coexist

    coexist /ˌkəʊɪɡˈzɪst/ vb (intransitive)1.to exist together at the same time or in the same place
    2.to exist together in peace
    When he said: he convivido con ellos: he means that he has live in peace and share time with them.

    coexist
    exist together,
    exist side-by-side,
    coincide,
    be synchronous,
    be contemporaneous,
    be simultaneous,
    occur simultaneously,
    accompany one another,
    live in peace
    Convivir=Vivir en compañía de otro u otros
     
  17. EddieZumac

    EddieZumac Senior Member

    Mexico City
    English/Spanish
    Yes, coexist is the best translation.
     
  18. Scheieian Senior Member

    Seattle, WA
    US English
    In some contexts, I think 'coexist' works. In the following sentence, however, it doesn't work.

    "Durante la semana pasada usted convivió con familiares, amigos o conocidos, asistió a fiestas o atendió visitas?"

    'Coexist' is used in certain contexts, but it is not an everyday word in English.The most typical use I see in English are those bumper stickers where "coexist" is spelled using a bunch of religious symbols, implying that all these religions need to learn to coexist. Coexistence sounds like an ongoing process, an indefinite amount of time. It tends to be used talking about lofty ideals of coexistence between peoples, etc.

    As a native English speaker, I would never say "hey dude, let's go out to the bar and coexist." Similarly, I would never ask someone: "In the past week, have you coexisted with family, friends or acquaintances, gone to parties or visits?"

    However, I would say: "In the past week, have you spent time with friends, family, gone to parties, etc.?" (This has a warm, friend/family feel to it. Significa compartir, pasar tiempo juntos. It's intentional)

    Actually, if you live with someone, saying you coexist could sound sarcastic. It sounds like you have nothing else to say, except that you exist together.
    Pepe: "How do you like your roommates?"
    Lupe: "We coexist."
    Pepe: "What do you like best about them?"
    Lupe: "They're not around very much"

    Possible English translations of 'convivir':
    -I get along well with my roommates (convivir en el sentido de llevarse bien, comportarse bien, sin conflicto)
    -I live with my partner (convivir en el sentido de 'vivir juntos')
    -spend time together (pasar tiempo juntos divertiéndose, etc.)
     
  19. JennyTW Senior Member

    Córdoba, Spain
    English - UK
    I agree that "co-exist" is no good here. In this part of the world, sometimes when people get together (for the day etc) they talk about "convivencia" and nobody's living together. So yes, in your context I think "spend time together" might work.
     
  20. Mirlo

    Mirlo Senior Member

    Missouri
    Castellano, Panamá/ USA
    That is because there are two different way to translate convivir
    One is relacionar, comprenetar = to get along
    the other one es cohabitar /coexistir=coexist

    I was talking about the particular case.
     
  21. Scheieian Senior Member

    Seattle, WA
    US English
    I realize that. I'm just saying we don't use the word 'coexist' in that way in English. Even in this sentence:
    "Son personas responsables y de buen caracter moral y familiar, ya que los conozco por más de 15 años y he convivido con ellos de cerca en los últimos 4 años."

    It could translate to English in a couple of ways, either as "I have lived with them for the past 4 years" or "I have spent a lot of time with them as close friends in the past 4 years" But as a native speaker of American English, I wouldn't say "I have coexisted with them for the past 4 years." It just sounds funny.
     

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