Croatian (BCS): I'd like to buy a pre-paid card

Discussion in 'Other Slavic Languages' started by Katatoniczka, Jun 24, 2013.

  1. Katatoniczka New Member

    Poland
    Polish
    So I got my previous thread locked and the question is generally the same, how do I translate "I'd like to buy a pre-paid card"(for X money) if I want to ask for one in a shop. Have in mind that I don't want to top up an account I already have but buy a new card, probably with a new number etc.

    Is that specific enough? If not please edit my post or tell me what to change without locking the thread.
     
  2. TriglavNationalPark

    TriglavNationalPark Senior Member

    Chicago, IL, U.S.A.
    Slovenian (a.k.a. Slovene)
    MOD NOTE: This is fine, Katatoniczka!
     
  3. itreius Senior Member

    Assembly
    pre-paid SIM kartica -> pre-paid SIM card (SIM card w/ phone number)

    bon -> pre-paid card (with the code which you enter to add money to your SIM)

    25 -> dvadeset i pet
    50 -> pedeset
    100 -> sto
    200 -> dvjesto

    There's obviously various ways to say it, you could try something along these lines

    Htjela bih kupiti pre-paid SIM karticu (sa X kuna na računu) (fem.), Htio bih kupiti pre-paid SIM karticu (sa X kuna na računu) (masc.)

    or

    Željela bih kupiti pre-paid SIM karticu (sa X kuna na računu) (fem.), Želio bih kupiti pre-paid SIM karticu (sa X kuna na računu) (masc.)

    or for a bon

    Htjela bih kupiti bon od X kuna (fem.), etc
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2013
  4. Katatoniczka New Member

    Poland
    Polish
    That helps a lot! And those sentences seem to be built a lot like the Polish ones so I guess it won't be too difficult for me.

    And if I wanted to add what network I want the card to be in, like T-mobile or something, where do I put it in the sentence?
     
  5. itreius Senior Member

    Assembly
    If you just want to say T-Mobile (or whatever other network), then add it between kupiti and pre-paid SIM karticu. Htjela bih kupiti T-mobile pre-paid SIM karticu.

    Alternatively, you could say Htjela bih kupiti pre-paid SIM karticu od T-Mobilea.
     
  6. slavic_one

    slavic_one Senior Member

    Prague, Czech Republic
    Croatian (štokavski, jekavski)
    Bear in mind that probably it won't be that simple - you go to some of the mobile operator store (so there's no need to specify which operator you want), say "Dobar dan. Htjela bih prepaid karticu.", and you get one. Probably they'll ask you which of their "super" tariff you want and so on. My point is - it would be better to communicate in English if you don't know any Croatian. Good luck and have a good time in Croatia.
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2013
  7. Katatoniczka New Member

    Poland
    Polish
    Yeah I hope to try and communicate in English but I wanted to have some Croatian help too. In Poland the older people etc. don't really speak English so I'm worried about Croatia because it's a similar country, I guess ;) So thanks.

    And if I'm in a smaller town without the specific store, where do I buy a card? Will I find it in a newsagent's? If yes, what is it called (or what does it usually look like), what sign do I look for?
    Sorry for a more cultural than linguistic question but I also want to know the name of the store.

    Thanks a lot again!
     
  8. slavic_one

    slavic_one Senior Member

    Prague, Czech Republic
    Croatian (štokavski, jekavski)
  9. Katatoniczka New Member

    Poland
    Polish
    Kiosk is what we call it in Polish too :) Thank you, you've been very helpful!
     
  10. slavic_one

    slavic_one Senior Member

    Prague, Czech Republic
    Croatian (štokavski, jekavski)
    I know. ;) You're welcome, I'm glad that I helped.
     
  11. Vanja Senior Member

    Serbian
    At news-stands (kiosks) you can only buy a pre-paid card . :) For post-paid card you need to sign a contract.
    There are.... well, I don't know the Croanian name for it, we call it "Hallo-card" - street phone card or calling card, for a street phone-cabin. I think it's cheaper solution for tourists.
     
  12. TriglavNationalPark

    TriglavNationalPark Senior Member

    Chicago, IL, U.S.A.
    Slovenian (a.k.a. Slovene)
    MOD NOTE: I would kindly ask you to limit the conversation to linguistic matters from this point on. Practical travel advice, while certainly useful to the original poster, should only be given via PM (or perhaps in our cultural forums).
     
  13. slavic_one

    slavic_one Senior Member

    Prague, Czech Republic
    Croatian (štokavski, jekavski)
    Telefonska kartica.
     

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