Crossing the street

Discussion in 'All Languages' started by ThomasK, Dec 26, 2012.

  1. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    How do you translate that please?

    Dutch: oversteken (across, over + go/..)
     
  2. DearPrudence

    DearPrudence Dépêche Mod

    IdF
    French (lower Normandy)
    In French:
    "traverser la rue" (literally: cross the street)
     
  3. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    Or across-going/ turning literally (tra-verser). Thanks!
     
  4. arielipi Senior Member

    Israel
    Hebrew
    hebrew:
    לחצות - colloquially pronounced lakhtzot, formally should be lakhatzot - strict use for crossing the thing between -> two points that have a gap/something between them; you cross the river, road, line, border, side. it can also be used to cut thing in half, cut bread in two.

    there is also לעבור laavor, which means to pass to point b(without importance of point a), or pass a test, it really acts as pass in english.
     
  5. ahmedcowon Senior Member

    In Arabic:

    across = عبر [‘abra] (across the street = عبر الشارع [‘abra ash-shaare‘])

    crossing = عبور [‘uboor]

    the verb "cross" = يعبر [ya‘bur] (In Egyptian Arabic, we use the verb يعدي [ye‘addi] for "cross")
     
  6. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    INteresting, thanks.

    Hebrew: interesting distinctions - and both implying some difficulty, I guess... I am surprised about the cutting though. Does the root have any equivalent in English, do you think?

    Arabic: I recognize the same root in /abra/, /uboor/, and /yabur/, but is the underlying idea the one of some kind of cross (X)?
     
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2012
  7. bibax Senior Member

    Czech
    Czech:

    přejíti, přecházeti = pře- (trans-) + jíti/choditi (to go on foot, to walk);
     
  8. apmoy70

    apmoy70 Senior Member

    Greek
    In Greek:

    «Διασχίζω» [ði.a'sçizo] (for its definition and etymology see here)
     
  9. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    But then: does it mean something like splitting the road, etymologically?
     
  10. apmoy70

    apmoy70 Senior Member

    Greek
    Could be, yes. But when we cross the road aren't we splitting it up in two halves?
     
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2012
  11. arielipi Senior Member

    Israel
    Hebrew
    What difficulty implying is there thomas? In hebrew it doesnt bear a cutting connotation, nor splitting, kh - tz-h is more like to cross/pass the "wall" blocking my passage.
     
  12. ahmedcowon Senior Member

    No, the underlying idea is exactly the same as what "arielipi" wrote in the following quote

     
  13. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    Thanks a lot, all of you. It is simply my problem: I think I have that mental image of crossing (X), and that I cannot really let go of that... worldview. I might be narrow-minded in this respect (aaaarrrrhhh), but I am willing to learn - by getting involved in WR for example. (I just thought of this: the 'over' prefix in Dutch etymologically refers to height. So one could think of crossing by passing over (above) something, whereas crossing the street does not of course refer to any jumping, nor is it somehow associated with it, as far as I can see... Don't know whether there are remains of this use of 'over' in Dutch...)

    I suppose the Slavic languages will have something like Czech here, with a prefix meaning something like 'through'.
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2012
  14. arielipi Senior Member

    Israel
    Hebrew
    that is just it: semitic equivalents do not see it that way, as cross is to get over something; the english view as i understand it is that cross takes it as if the thing im crossing has an importance, thus im crossing the street, and not passing on it.
     
  15. e2-e4 X Senior Member

    Русский
    Russian has a verbal prefix that accounts for crossing something, the prefix is "пере". As they usually cross a street by foot, the verb that the prefix is added to is "ходить". So, "to cross the street" is "переходить улицу". One could "пересекать улицу" as well; "пересекать" is a generic verb that means any object crossing.
     
  16. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    But /pere/ does not imply going round, does it (thinking of Greek 'peri-')? What else can you cross? Could you cross plans (thwarting them)?
     
  17. e2-e4 X Senior Member

    Русский
    No, it does not. But it can refer to selecting each item out of a set, one by one.
    "Перечеркнуть планы": the root in this verb refers to making lines with a pen. "To cross out the plans"
     
  18. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    Hi, Thomas. In Polish, Lithuanian and Russian the verbs used do not have anything to do with the cross. Przejsc in Polish, pereiti in Lithuanian and perehodit (переходить) in Russian, but also another verb can be used peresiekat (пересекать) which comes from cutting, I think -- like you would with a sword, not really anything to do with a cross.
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2012
  19. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    @Liliana: that is an interesting note, indeed. We always think we understand or 'know' the word, and then think we can extend the use the same way we do it in our own language --- but we cannot, or at least we often cannot.

    But then it means: forget about the plans, I suppose. I think of a context where we have plans, and where our partner/ ... has planned other things, which then interfere with our plans. In Dutch doorkruisen would imply some kind of collision and the impossibility to go on. Does that sound like your meaning?
     
  20. e2-e4 X Senior Member

    Русский
    No, it means that something destroyed the plans for unspecified reasons, "deleted" them, so to say; it cancelled them.
     
  21. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    There is a similar word in Polish -- pokrzyżowalo (plany). Something got in the way and destroyed my plans.(cross- krzyż stem)
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2012
  22. Halfdan Junior Member

    Canadian English
    In Swedish it's gå över gatan. (to go across the street)
     
  23. Pretty_Gaella

    Pretty_Gaella Junior Member

    Naga City, Bicol, Philippines
    Filipino, English & Spanish
    In Filipino crossing the street is pagtawid sa kalye :)
     
  24. Grefsen

    Grefsen Senior Member

    Southern California
    English - United States
    A very similar Norwegian translation is "gå over gaten."
     
  25. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    I'd like to ask: what are your associations as regards the meaning of 'over' here and in general? Something like 'above' [an obstacle] or more like 'across'? IN Dutch the meaning that I associate with 'over' is for example 'over a fence' (over de afsluiting).

    I suppose 'sa' is 'over'. How else can you use it? Is it like across (straight line crossing the straight road) - or do you have other associations? Is pagtawid a very general verb?
     
  26. mataripis

    mataripis Senior Member

    my Tagalog translation for "crossing the street" is "Pagtawid sa Daanan". In The case there is overpass, we use "pagdaan sa overpass or pasong ibabaw". When passing through the tunnel, we use "lumagos sa lagusan o pasong ilalim".But when passing through the obstacle like fence, we use "Sumampa sa bakuran".
     
  27. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    So the sa implies some kind of 'trans'-movement, I suppose: beyond, very broad as such. I still don't know what verbs you are using: what do they mean?
     
  28. mataripis

    mataripis Senior Member

    Sa is "to" in English. Crossing (to) the street= Pagtawid sa Daanan.
    In other case "sa" can be "in" ; in the corner= sa tabihan/gilidan. Tagalog omits the article"the" in many grammars. The verbs i used are ;1.) Tumawid= to cross (by)? 2.) Dumaan= to pass through 3.)Lumagos= to pass through (below) 4.)Sumampa= to leap above
     
  29. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    Hi, Thomas. the Swedish över does not have anything to do with the cross. I think it is a cognate of over. (like in "go over the bridge").
     
  30. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    Thanks. It resembles our over - but in Dutch it can also used when referring to speaking about things. With you too?
     
  31. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    Well, yes, but you can also discuss things over a cup of coffee. Wouldn't it be similar? It might not in fact -- I think it has the function of about in your example.
     

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