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  1. mookxi

    mookxi Senior Member

    Japanese\Chinese\English & Australia.
    Bonjour a tous !

    I don't understand what this word means "dépouillage" in this context:

    << Une voleuse specialisee dans le depouillage de pirates. Elle les deteste plus que tout au monde >>

    I know "depouiller" is to study ..

    But really i'm not sure in this context !

    Your help would be appreciated !
     
  2. NemoNobody

    NemoNobody Senior Member

    France métropolitaine
    French - France
    In French, verb "dépouiller" basicly means "to take skin out" (usually from some dead animal).

    In a figurative way, it means "to steal by threat/force any valuable items (possibly including some/all clothes) from someone"

    "dépouillage" => "action de dépouiller" (but it is the first time I encounter this word)
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2009
  3. mookxi

    mookxi Senior Member

    Japanese\Chinese\English & Australia.
    Thank you NemoNobody ! :)

    I found this word in the manga "One Piece" that was translated in French. Perhaps then it means 'the skinning' or something but I think I understand the gist of it !

    By the way, I've noticed a lot of words ending in '-age' are masculin ? Just like how many nouns ending in '-tion' are feminin (most but there are a few exceptions).
     
  4. NemoNobody

    NemoNobody Senior Member

    France métropolitaine
    French - France
    >>>"By the way, I've noticed a lot of words ending in '-age' are masculin"<<<
    Correct, they are all masculine.

    '-age' ending can be used to form some generic sort of pidgin gerund in French after a verb.

    Most people would understand it, but most of time, it will sound terrible to them if it is not already in widespread use...

    >>>Just like how many nouns ending in '-tion' are feminin (most but there are a few exceptions<<<
    I am not aware of exceptions to this rule, do you have any at hand ?
     
  5. wildan1

    wildan1 Moderando ma non troppo

    here: to shake somebody down
     
  6. mookxi

    mookxi Senior Member

    Japanese\Chinese\English & Australia.
    The only ones I remember are :
    un bastion
    un cation

    But there are certainely a few more.
     
  7. NemoNobody

    NemoNobody Senior Member

    France métropolitaine
    French - France
    "The only ones I remember are :
    un bastion
    un cation"

    You're perfectly right Mookxi, I have been mistaken by the fact these word do not come from latin in which words ending in "-tio" are all feminine as well as their French counterparts.

    "bastion" does not come directly from latin (see http://www.dico-definitions.com/dictionnaire/definition/3018/Bastion.php).

    "cation" is most probably a contracted form of "cathod ion", hence having no latin counterpart (and is a recent neologism).
     
  8. Kelly B

    Kelly B Senior Member

    USA English
    Fleecing is a tempting choice, because it feels similar, but I suppose it doesn't work because it refers more to swindling (cheating someone) than to stealing....
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2009
  9. johndot Senior Member

    English - England
    What about “stripping”? It used to be a medieval torture (to strip the skin from), and today one of its meanings is “to remove assets or rank from”.
     
  10. NemoNobody

    NemoNobody Senior Member

    France métropolitaine
    French - France
    >>>What about “stripping”? <<<

    “to remove assets or rank from" would be probably a little bit mild in the original context (although medieval torture was not)...
     
  11. johndot Senior Member

    English - England
    “We were burgled last night—the place was stripped,”—commonly heard from people who have suffered this fate.
     
  12. Cath.S.

    Cath.S. Senior Member

    Bretagne, France
    français de France
    This is totally off-topic, but I do: un bastion.
     

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