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Danish: Skagen (prounication please)

Discussion in 'Nordic Languages' started by Stoggler, Feb 14, 2013.

  1. Stoggler

    Stoggler Senior Member

    Kingdom of Sussex
    UK English
    Hi

    Simple question - how is the name of the town in Denmark called Skagen pronounced? In IPA if poss please.

    Thanks a lot/Tusind tak
     
  2. Alxmrphi Senior Member

    Reykjavík, Ísland
    UK English
    Usually if you want to hear the pronunciation of a word, pretty much consistently, in my experience, there is an extremely good chance it exists on the site forvo.com. I found a recording here if you want to click and hear how a native has recorded it. To me it sounds like [skeɪʔn̩] but I'm no expert on Danish pronunciation so don't take that as a definitive answer. Hopefully someone can confirm/correct that.
     
  3. Stoggler

    Stoggler Senior Member

    Kingdom of Sussex
    UK English
    Thanks - cracking site. I'll have to have a proper look at it when I get home this evening
     
  4. Stoggler

    Stoggler Senior Member

    Kingdom of Sussex
    UK English
    To me it sounds something like /'skeˀən/

    Is that a fair representation?
     
  5. Alxmrphi Senior Member

    Reykjavík, Ísland
    UK English
    It might be. As I said I'm no expert on Danish specifically but I think I perceive a diphthong (even though it's only a slight one). I think it cuts off too early in the second syllable to have a schwa in it (which is why I put a syllabic [n] in my version). It can depend because a phonological IPA representation (between slashes) can be significantly different from a phonetic representation (between braces). I think if we're not really nit-picking then your attempt is fine (nb. previous caveats about my 'guesstimation').
     
  6. bicontinental Senior Member

    U.S.A.
    English (US), Danish, bilingual
    Yes, I'd say so. (The glottal stop shouldn't be too forceful)
    Bic.

    Edit: Alxmrphi, I wouldn't disagree with [skeɪˀən] either, especially when the speaker enunciates clearly. I really don't think we can avoid the schwa though.:)
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2013
  7. Stoggler

    Stoggler Senior Member

    Kingdom of Sussex
    UK English
    Think you're right about the syllabic [n] now that I listen to it again, and I do pick up the hint of a diphthong.

    Thanks for the responses.
     

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