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Dao, cambiao, what are these words?

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by ResoluteTwo, Nov 21, 2009.

  1. ResoluteTwo New Member

    American English
    Hi everyone,

    I'm trying to translate this stanza from an Argentinean tango song called "Malevaje" by Enrique Santos Discepolo. It goes like this:

    Decí por Dios que me has dao,
    que estoy tan cambiao...
    ¡no sé más quién soy!

    Here's what I've got so far:

    "I _____ through God that you have ____ to me,
    that I am so _________...
    I don't know who I am anymore!"

    Basically, I'm tripped up over the words "decí," "dao," and "cambiao." Does anybody know what these words mean or even what language they come from??? It doesn't look like Spanish, more like Portuguese or something... Or is this like some kind of regional dialect of Spanish in Argentina?
     
  2. manxo Senior Member

    Pontevedra
    Galego y Castellano de España
    Ao es terminación vulgar por -ado. Decí es dime en hispanoamérica.
     
  3. bx2 Senior Member

    Barcelona, Spain
    Catalan and Spanish
    That's Spanish:

    Dado (given)
    Cambiado (changed)
    Decí (Dime: imperative)

    These are forms commonly used, specially in Argentina, but also in Spain. To avoid the d in dado or cambiado is not accepted by the Academy, but many people uses those forms.

    "Decí" is specifically Argentinian Spanish (I don't know in Chile and Uruguay), and never used in European Spanish.
     
  4. hawking Junior Member

    Español, México
    En America latina comerse las letras se utiliza mucho en las canciones, sobre todo si son canciones tropicales como las de Celiz Cruz, con sus famosas lao (lado) , pa' (para) y en España tambien se usa como partio (partido), Madri (Madrid), en fin muchos se comen la letra D.

    Es como cuando en Estados Unidos escriben Da en lugar de The, es simplemente slang.
     
  5. ResoluteTwo New Member

    American English
    Manxo, bx2, hawking, thanks for your help! I appreciate it.
     

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