Date format: 10th June

Discussion in 'English Only' started by volver, May 10, 2007.

  1. volver Senior Member

    french belgium
    Hello

    I got mixed up with 10th of June or 10th June.

    What date was it? It was the 10thJune or 10th of June.

    Should I skip the off in writing?
    Should I leave it in speaking?


    Thank you


    VOLVER
     
  2. party girl Senior Member

    Grenoble
    English
    Write; 10th June

    Say; It was the 10th of June
     
  3. Haylette Senior Member

    UK, English
    You can also write June 10, which you read as "June the tenth"
     
  4. Brioche

    Brioche Senior Member

    Adelaide
    Australia English
    To help you remember the rule, think of American Independence Day.
    It's the Fourth of July.
     
  5. Haylette Senior Member

    UK, English
    And yet we say September eleventh.
     
  6. volver Senior Member

    french belgium
    So speaking is 10th of June
    Writing is 10th June.


    Is that correct?

    VOLVER
     
  7. GreenWhiteBlue

    GreenWhiteBlue Senior Member

    New York
    USA - English
    Yes, but we don't say "eleventh September". It would be "eleventh of September" or "September eleventh", just as it is "Fourth of July" or "July fourth."
     
  8. volver Senior Member

    french belgium
    Yes, but we don't say "eleventh September". It would be "eleventh of September" or "September eleventh", just as it is "Fourth of July" or "July fourth

    I kind of understand your point but not totally.

    We don't say eleventh September, do you mean in speaking or in writing ?

    Normally, we should use it in writing? Isn't that right?

    We don't use eleventh September in speaking.

    VOLVER
     
  9. Brioche

    Brioche Senior Member

    Adelaide
    Australia English
    In English you have 3 possibilities.


    the tenth of June,
    or
    June the tenth,
    or
    June tenth.

    The tenth of June is written 10th June.

    June tenth is not very common in BE.

    There are even some people who say "June ten", but this is not standard usage [yet!].
     
  10. volver Senior Member

    french belgium
    Thanks a lot for your detailed explanation.

    VOLVER
     
  11. Terry Morti Senior Member

    UK
    How we all ended up referring to "nine eleven" is a mystery.
     
  12. Xavi009 Junior Member

    Mexico - Canada - spanish
    Someone just asked the same in the spanish forum. hahaha. what a coincidence!

    I agree June 10, 2006, 2007, etc.
     
  13. JamesM

    JamesM à la Mod

    I think there might be an AE/BE difference here. I think in AE we would say and write "10th of June" not "10th June". "June 10th" would be fine, but "10th June" looks distinctly British to me.
     
  14. Blumengarten Senior Member

    Pennsylvania
    America / English
    In the US, if you dial 911 on your telephone, you'll get the emergency operator. Some people call this nine-one-one, others nine-eleven. Since "9/11" happened on the eleventh of September, and that can be written 9/11/01, people started calling the event "nine-eleven." (PS that's my birthday)

    I've seen dates written as 10 June, June 10, June 10th, tenth of June, June tenth, but I don't recall ever seeing 10th June.
     
  15. Terry Morti Senior Member

    UK
    It is only in America that the order is written, MM/DD/YYYY I believe there is a campaign to alter it it to more standard international form DD/MM/YYYY since it is only possible to be sure what is intended if the number is greater than 12.

    I hadn't connected it with the emergency phone number, that makes sense. Thankyou. Given what the AE apeakers above are saying, that dates are not generally referred to as nine eleven so in this case the reference to the phone number must be the key.
     
  16. Blumengarten Senior Member

    Pennsylvania
    America / English
    That's not entirely true. In the company were I work, the Canadians also write the date MM/DD/YYYY so that there is no confusion, and it is probably true with most people who do a lot of business across the border.
     
  17. Terry Morti Senior Member

    UK
  18. tomandjerryfan

    tomandjerryfan Senior Member

    Ontario
    English (Canada)
    In CaE, recommended usage is as such:

    June 10
    June 10th
    the 10th of June
    the tenth of June

    Never:
    10 June
    10th June

    If you're going to include the year:

    June 10, 2007
    10 June 2007
    I prefer the first one, but both are used here. June 10th, 2007, or June tenth, 2007 are not recommended.
     
  19. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
  20. cycloneviv

    cycloneviv Senior Member

    Perth, Western Australia
    English - Australia
    Yurk! I would never do that. To avoid confusion I'd write day/month in words/year. Changing the numbers to the US format would only create MORE confusion to anyone in the original country who was trying, for example, to file the letters in order.
     
  21. fab69 Junior Member

    french / english
    Hi

    I always wondered how you should pronounce this <December 9> when written in a text.

    1 'December nine', 2 'December ninth' or 3 'December the ninth'?

    Thanks!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 10, 2014
  22. Andygc

    Andygc Senior Member

    Devon
    British English

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