Date format: AE/BE

Discussion in 'English Only' started by frenchaudrey, Jul 6, 2006.

  1. frenchaudrey Senior Member

    Lyon
    French, France
    Hi

    I'd like to know the differences between dates in BE vs AE.
    For example : "July 6th 2006" vs "6th July 2006".... "06/07/2006" vs "07/06/2006"...
    Want to make sure that I can distinguish these 2 ways of writing dates... and that I write dates correctly by the way ;)

    Thanks in advance for your help :)
     
  2. SofiaB Senior Member

    English Asia
    Generally BE uses Day month year and AE uses Month day year but AE can use the BE version it is considered more formal.
     
  3. Tatzingo

    Tatzingo Senior Member

    Where on Earth??
    English, UK
    Hi,

    UK = DD/MM/YYYY

    US = MM/DD/YYYY

    D=Date
    M=Month
    Y=Year

    Tatz.
     
  4. frenchaudrey Senior Member

    Lyon
    French, France
    Thanks very much to you two...
    But what about the "written" version, i.e 6th July vs July 6th... is it written correctly ? Should there be "th" or not ?

    Thanks in advance :)
     
  5. daoxunchang Senior Member

    China
    Chinese China
    If there is already "th", you read with a "the" but do not write with one.
     
  6. frenchaudrey Senior Member

    Lyon
    French, France
    Thanks very much :)
     
  7. MarcB Senior Member

    US English
    The 6th of July and July 6th are both in use. the two previous posts are correct as to the BE and AE variants. AE uses both with m d y as a preference.
     
  8. Kevman Senior Member

    Phoenix, Arizona
    USA English
    In cases where the month preceds the date, the 'th' is optional. No one (as far as I know) ever pronounces 'July 6' aloud as "July six". It is understood to mean "July sixth".

    This may also be true when the date precedes the month, as in '6 July', but I'm not positive... I don't see that very often.
     
  9. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
  10. foxfirebrand

    foxfirebrand Senior Member

    The Northern Rockies
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    Many a computer file written on July 6, 2006 will be named 20060706-- yymmdd, in other words. This way the files come out chronologically arranged.

    I believe the practice will become more widespread-- of course I realize you weren't asking questions about the future.
    .
     
  11. Brioche

    Brioche Senior Member

    Adelaide
    Australia English
    YYYY/MM/DD is the Chinese way for dates, and in some other Asian languages.
     
  12. daoxunchang Senior Member

    China
    Chinese China
    Yes, Brioche, you are right on this. And the first thing we learnt about dates (and addresses) in our English classess is that you place them the reverse way we place them.
     
  13. foxfirebrand

    foxfirebrand Senior Member

    The Northern Rockies
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    Just when I thought I was going to get through a day without learning something!
    .
     
  14. frenchaudrey Senior Member

    Lyon
    French, France
    Thanks very much to all of you :)
     
  15. sb70012

    sb70012 Senior Member

    Azerbaijani
    Hello again,
    Would you please be nice enough to check the parenthesis' written by me and let me know if they work or not?
    Just please tell me which ones are incorrect. (I mean the parenthesis')

    Thank you.

    I got confused

    1. On July 15=
    (On July the fifteenth)
    (On July fifteenth)
    (On the July fifteenth)

    2. On 15th July=
    (On the fifteenth of July)
    (On fifteenth of July)
    (On fifteenth of the July)

    3. On July 15th=
    (On July fifteenth)
    (On the July fifteenth)
    (On July the fifteenth)

    4. On 15 July=
    (On fifteenth of July)
    (On the fifteenth of July)
    (On fifteenth of the July)
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2013
  16. DearPrudence

    DearPrudence Dépêche Mod

    IdF
    French (lower Normandy)
    Hi sb70012

    I would say (I can't include the :cross: because there are to many of them, but if you don't see a :tick:, then the suggestion is not correct:
    So as it must have been mentioned somewhere:

    BrE:
    written: on 15 July or on 15th July
    read: on the fifteenth of July

    AmE:
    written: on July, 15 or July, 15th (but not so sure about the latter possiblity)
    read: on July the fifteenth
     
  17. sb70012

    sb70012 Senior Member

    Azerbaijani
    Thank you my friend.
     
  18. RM1(SS)

    RM1(SS) Senior Member

    Connecticut
    English - US (Midwest)
    No.

    Written:
    "On July 15, 2013"
    "On July 15"
    "On July 15th"

    Spoken:
    "On July 15th"
    "On July the 15th"
    "On the 15th of July"
     
  19. vivace160 Junior Member

    Hudson Valley, New York
    American English
    While "on July the fifteenth" isn't incorrect, in my experience with AmE it's not that common. I am considerably more likely to say "on July fifteenth". I think I'm actually more likely to say "on the fifteenth of July" than I am "on July the fifteenth".

    Also, I don't think I've ever seen anyone write "on July, 15", only "on July 15" without the comma.
     
  20. Patatos Senior Member

    France
    Français
    << Mod note: This question was added to an existing thread. Please read from the top. >>

    Hello !

    I'd like to date one of my project. My text is written in american English.
    The text is

    Name : My project
    Release : [date]

    I'm unsure about how to write the date. Should it be : June 20th, 2013 / June 20, 2013 / June 20 2013 / June 20th 2013 ?

    Thank you very much for your help in advance.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 3, 2014
  21. Miss Julie

    Miss Julie Senior Member

    Chicago metro area
    English-U.S.
    My preferences are the second and first one (but mainly the second :)).
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2014
  22. Patatos Senior Member

    France
    Français
    Thank you :D I was not sure because some people on the internet said "20th" isn't used. I didn't know if this was accurate or not. Plus the coma thing is difficult to know >.<
     
  23. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    I would not use the "th" – ever.

    If you put writing dates in the Search box, or click that link, you'll find previous threads.
     
  24. Patatos Senior Member

    France
    Français
    Thank you :)
     
  25. Egmont Senior Member

    Massachusetts, U.S.
    English - U.S.
    I would always use a comma. The choice between "20" and "20th" is, to me, a matter of style. I consider them both correct.
     
  26. Patatos Senior Member

    France
    Français
    I see, thank you. About the "th" most of the time US English speakers don't want to use it. It seems to be an "old" English rule and more followed in UK English than US English. Am I right ?
     
  27. Parla Senior Member

    New York City
    English - US
    We do use the "th" in speech even when we don't do so in writing. That is, reading aloud a date written "June 20, 2013", most Americans would say "June twentieth, twenty thirteen."
     
  28. Wordsmyth

    Wordsmyth Senior Member

    Location: Mostly SW France
    Native language: English (BrE)
    I wouldn't say that, Patatos. I work in a multi-lingual environment, and the only people I regularly see writing "th" are not native English speakers (sometimes they even put 1th, 2th, 3th!).

    Most BrE speakers I know write dates in d-m-y order (20 June 2013), which is consistent with numerical dates in the UK, which are always d-m-y. Some do still write June 20, 2013 (or occasionally June 20th, 2013) — but 20/6/2013! At least our friends across the pond are consistent in that respect: m-d-y in both forms.

    Ws:)
     
  29. natkretep

    natkretep Moderato con anima

    Singapore
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    The American date style is derived from the historical English style. If you look at the letters of Jane Austen, for instance, you will generally see the format 'January 3, 1801'. (And it's interesting that this is still the preferred style according to the American responses.)

    British style has of course evolved into a D-M-Y format (except for some newspapers), from a style with fuller punctuation (10th October, 1962) to one without (10 October 2013), but some continue to use the ordinal. (I myself have reverted to this. And I also use roman numerals: today is 3.iv.2014.)
     
  30. Patatos Senior Member

    France
    Français
    I understand better now. Thank you very much! I'll go with June 20, 2013. It seems to be the more appropriate if I write in american English.

    About roman numerals, are there many people who use them?
     
  31. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    There's one. :D
     
  32. Keith Bradford

    Keith Bradford Senior Member

    Brittany, NW France
    English (Midlands UK)
    To be honest, the only way to write a date that's not going to be computer-read is by spelling out the month. The American usage is totally illogical (as if one said "ten yards, three inches and five miles") and for the first 12 days of each month raises so many ambiguities with the rest of the world that I always avoid three-number dates when translating; for example I convert a French 11/6/2014 into 11 June 2014 or June 11 2014. That way, British and American readers both get a true rendering, but without (I hope) feeling put out.

    There's a website that gives the scientific argument on this issue: http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/iso-time.html which quotes International Standard ISO 8601.

    As for the Roman numerals, they're occasionally seen among academics and clergymen.
     
  33. natkretep

    natkretep Moderato con anima

    Singapore
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
  34. Patatos Senior Member

    France
    Français
    Thank very much for the details and the other thread link o/
     
  35. the_nuts Junior Member

    Italy
    Italian
    September 22 vs 22nd September

    Can you tell me which one is better or what is the difference?

    PS I have to use it in a website, for a list of items scheduled to be released this week, for example:

     
  36. Ann O'Rack Senior Member

    UK
    UK English
    This is a difference between US and UK English, and explains why the date the Twin Towers were destroyed is known as 9/11, because Americans put the month first whereas Brits put the day first.

    So you need to look at the main audience for the website. If the target audience is mainly American, then put the month first. If mainly British, put the day first.

    (And in BrE we are tending to drop "nd", "rd", "th" from dates, so you could say "22 September".)
     
  37. Andygc

    Andygc Senior Member

    Devon
    British English
  38. JustKate

    JustKate Moderate Mod

    The_nuts, I've merged your thread with one of the existing ones. I think if you read it, you'll find the answers to your questions. You can also find even more threads by clicking on the links Andy provided. But if you still have questions, feel free to add them to this thread. :)

    JustKate
    English Only moderator
     
  39. the_nuts Junior Member

    Italy
    Italian
    Thank you @Ann O'Rack and @JustKate.
     

Share This Page