1. semiller Senior Member

    DFW, Texas
    USA-English
    Yes, both words means "more." What is the actual difference? I believe it has more to do with usuage in the sentence than anything. Ai-je raison? Merci bien!
     
  2. Ze Zeum Junior Member

    davantage is always vague. If it's "one more", then it's "un de plus". If it's "more pizza" or "more pizzas" then "davantage de pizza" and "davantage de pizzas" have the same meaning as "plus de pizza", "plus de pizzas". But davantage is more high-level.
     
  3. semiller Senior Member

    DFW, Texas
    USA-English
    I appreciate your attempt to answer, but I don't understand what you mean by "high level." Tu pourras t'expliquer un peu plus s t p? Merci bien.
     
  4. Ze Zeum Junior Member

    oups... I meant "langage soutenu".
     
  5. timpeac

    timpeac Senior Member

    England
    English (England)
    You can't use "davantage" with an adjective to make a comparative - eg "il est plus riche" not "il est davantage riche" = "he is richer".

    More high level means more formal.
     
  6. semiller Senior Member

    DFW, Texas
    USA-English
    Compris! Merci bien!
     
  7. Timotheos Junior Member

    Montreal
    English, Nigeria
    Salut,

    J'espère que je peux toujours contribuer à cette discussion ancienne. Mon manuel de français fait cette distinction :

    * Davantage s'emploie à la fin de la phrase ou de la proposition :

    Tu devrais manger davantage.
    Si tu mangeais davantage, tu te porterais mieux.

    * Généralement, on emploie davantage (et non pas plus) devant un nom quand le deuxième terme de la comparaison n'est pas exprimé :
    -- Il a plus d'argent que moi, mais j'ai davantage de loisirs. (sous-entendu que lui)

    -- Grammaire fonctionnelle du français, par Marcelle Sandhu, pages 368 et 590.
     
  8. Gil Senior Member

    Français, Canada
    J'essaie de résumer:
    "Joseph livre plus rapidement davantage de pizzas plus chaudes."
     
  9. James Stephens Senior Member

    Oklahoma, USA
    English, USA
    I am confused about when plus means more and when it means no more. If I say plus de cafe when I am asked if I want more coffe, what does that mean? What about encore de cafe?
     
  10. Timotheos Junior Member

    Montreal
    English, Nigeria
    In general, «plus» means "more", and «ne ... plus» means "no more". I am no expert, but I believe that the meaning of «plus de café» would depend on the context, including your facial expression and gestures. Literally, it definitely means "more coffee", but in casual spoken language, it could very well be short for «Ne me donne plus de café», if accompanied with shaking of the head and an open hand indicating "no"--meaning "no more coffee". That's one of the subtelties that makes language richer than what is written in black and white.

    «Encore de café» literally means "coffee still" or "coffee yet", that is, "keep pouring it on". I don't think it could ever mean "no more coffee".
     
  11. timpeac

    timpeac Senior Member

    England
    English (England)
    And usually - natives to confirm - when "plus" means "no more" you don't pronounce the "s" and when it means "more" you do. There's an exception to that where you say "xxx est plus yyyy que zzz" then the "s" isn't pronounced either.
     
  12. Gil Senior Member

    Français, Canada
    Je crois que tu as raison.
     
  13. James Stephens Senior Member

    Oklahoma, USA
    English, USA
    I am going with you guys until I learn differently. I did appreciate Timotheous' reminder about nonverbal language.
     
  14. LV4-26

    LV4-26 Senior Member

    Plus de café is definitely ambiguous. But only in written language. When spoken, you just have to pronounce the 's' as Tim said and then everyone know it means more coffee.

    However, you rarely ask for or offer plus de café in French. If it comes directly from the coffee pot then you'd rather say "un peu plus de café" or une autre tasse de café. In a....cafe, you would ask for un autre café.
     
  15. James Stephens Senior Member

    Oklahoma, USA
    English, USA
    Very helpful. Thank you. I appreciate the fact that you cut through the question to get to the real question: how does one respond when asked if he wants more coffee.
     
  16. Giuliadel New Member

    Italy
    Hello everybody,
    and what about "toujours davantage". Would you really use such an expression?

    Cheers!
     
  17. Euskaldun Senior Member

    french/France
    Hi,

    Yes you can say in french "toujours davantage" instead of "toujours plus". In return I would like to know how to say in english "je ne l'en remercie que davantage (or que plus)". Thanks.
     
  18. James Stephens Senior Member

    Oklahoma, USA
    English, USA
    I want to guess. I am not sufficiently familar with French idiom to know. We have an adage, "Fools rush in where wise men dare not tread."

    "je ne l'en remercie que davantage (or que plus)"

    I think this may mean, "No, thank you just the same." If I am right, then I suggest simply saying, "No, thank you."
    Adding the words, "just the same" is considered by many to be obsequious, too eager to please.

    In the case of declining the offer of a child, the "just the same" may be added to give reassurance. Another reassuring response would be "No. Thank you for asking."


    I am waiting to hear from someone who KNOWS. Hurry! The suspense is killing me.
     
  19. Kat LaQ Senior Member

    NY, NY
    English, USA
    "I can't thank you enough" ???

    This is just a guess, as I am with James on not being familiar with the expression "je ne l'en remercie que davantage". Could a francophone clarify this expression for us? Merci.
     
  20. suffert Senior Member

    Bretagne
    French, France
    "je ne l'en remercie que davantage (or que plus)"
    est du langage plutôt soutenu. Cette expression s'emploie quand on est vraiment reconnaissant envers une personne qui a fait des efforts particuliers pour nous rendre service par exemple.
     
  21. CARNESECCHI Senior Member

    Auvergne
    French / France
    Hello
    "je ne t'en remercie que davantage" = "I thank you even more because of it"
    Hope it helps
     
  22. CARNESECCHI Senior Member

    Auvergne
    French / France
    Hello
    No coffee left :
    "plus de café"
    "Y'a plus de café"

    Do you want some coffee ? :
    "je vous sers ?"
    "Un p'tit café ?"
    "une petite tasse ?"

    Do you want some more coffee ? :
    "pluss de café ?" = usually with "un peu plus"
    "Une goutte de plus ?"
    "je vous ressers"

    Yes, I''d like some more coffee : "s'il vous plaît"

    No thanks, I've got enough coffee : "merci"

    Hope it helps!
     
  23. Kat LaQ Senior Member

    NY, NY
    English, USA
    In that case, I think "I can't thank you enough" is appropriate. It means: I appreciate all the effort you made on my behalf, I'm very happy with the results, a mere "thank you" doesn't seem enough in this case, etc.
     

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