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Deal breaker

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by V52, Feb 21, 2006.

  1. V52

    V52 Senior Member

    Rome
    Italy Italian
    Hi,
    can anyone give me a translation for
    " Deal breaker " ?
    Grazie
    Vittorio
     
  2. You little ripper! Senior Member

    Australia
    Australian English
    A deal breaker is any factor that is significant enough to terminate a negotiation. It's a term that is used in business or politics.
     
  3. V52

    V52 Senior Member

    Rome
    Italy Italian
    Cara Vic
    Il contesto è un'intervista sulle caratteristiche che determinano un interesse sessuale.
    Charles gave the solution , and it is in Italian "punto chiave" , " elemento determinante"
    Ciao
    Vittorio
     
  4. ElaineG

    ElaineG Senior Member

    Brooklyn NY
    USA/English
    N.B.: A "deal breaker" è sempre un "punto chiave" in senso negativo. Non so se c'è qualcosa che esprime questo senso in italiano:

    E.g., "I thought he was really cute, but I found out he smokes 2 packs a day; that's a deal breaker for me."

    "On our second date, he told me that he likes dressing up in his mom's clothing -- that was a definite deal breaker!"
     
  5. You little ripper! Senior Member

    Australia
    Australian English
    Sarebbe qualcosa che ammazza un accordo o un'affare. Un ammazza accordo/affare??? That probably doesn't make sense but it may give you the idea.
     
  6. Raphillon Senior Member

    Rome
    Italy
    "Ragione per rompere"?
    "Punto di rottura"?
    "Causa di rottura"

    The following are suitable only speaking of business:
    "Causa di recesso"
    "Causa di rescissione (di un contratto)"
     
  7. You little ripper! Senior Member

    Australia
    Australian English
    Ragione per rompere/causa di rottura sound O.K. to me. Si può rompere un accordo?
     
  8. Raphillon Senior Member

    Rome
    Italy
    Si, "Rompere un accordo" is very common. Così come "rompere una trattativa"
     
  9. You little ripper! Senior Member

    Australia
    Australian English
    Thanks Andrea. Can you use the word ammazzare figuratively as I did earlier?
     
  10. Raphillon Senior Member

    Rome
    Italy
    Si può usare metaforicamente, solo non l'ho mai sentito usare in questo caso....

    Però potresti benissimo dire "E' un ammazza-accordi", qualunque Italiano capirebbe benissimo.

    Penso che starebbe bene utilizzato per qualcosa di molto definitivo, tipo:

    "La malafede è un ammazza accordi"

    Qualcosa, cioè, capace di distruggere qualunque accordo, non solo quello di cui ci si occupa adesso, perchè è un espressione molto forte: quando qualcosa ammazza un accordo l'accordo è morto, distrutto e nulla può farlo rinascere....

    Spero di essermi fatto capire :)
     
  11. Raphillon Senior Member

    Rome
    Italy
    Tra l'altro credo che starebbe meglio utilizzando il verbo invece che l'aggettivo:

    "La malafede ammazza (o uccide) gli accordi"

    è talmente logico che sembra un proverbio.... :)
     
  12. You little ripper! Senior Member

    Australia
    Australian English
    Thanks Andrea. I understood you perfectly. :)
     
  13. Elisa68 Senior Member

    Italy Language:Italian
    Negli esempi di Elaine mi sembra che si possa tradurre anche come:
    Situazione inaccettabile.
     
  14. lsp

    lsp Senior Member

    NY
    US, English
    {Gasp!} I disagree. Maybe. "We asked them to throw in 10 free hours of training. That's a deal breaker for signing the contract." It's something we want, the absence of it is the negative that breaks the deal.
     
  15. ElaineG

    ElaineG Senior Member

    Brooklyn NY
    USA/English
    Sorry for the English, but I'm sleepy. Any translation of "deal breaker" should take into account that it is used for dating and relationships in current speech (the business context is, if anything, a minority use at this point!).

    I'm not sure if "ragione per rompere un accordo" would be used colloquially in this sense or not? Elisa's "situazione inaccettabile" captures the personal context, but maybe not the sense that you've weighed up the factors and the "deal breaker" is the one you can't stomach.

    Maybe Italian doesn't have a good idiom for these cases, but I'll give some more examples. I'm not feeling creative so I've cadged from Google:

     
  16. Raphillon Senior Member

    Rome
    Italy
    Nei due esempi tradurrei "quanto basta per tagliare"

    I thought he was really cute, but I found out he smokes 2 packs a day; that's a deal breaker for me.
    Pensavo fosse davvero carino, ma ho scoperto che fuma 2 pacchetti al giorno; per me questo è quanto basta per tagliare

    On our second date, he told me that he likes dressing up in his mom's clothing -- that was a definite deal breaker!
    Al nostro secondo appuntamento mi ha detto che gli piace vestirsi con gli abiti di sua madre -- E' stato quanto basta per tagliare

    Negli esempi di Elaine si può usare: "basta per tagliare?"
     
  17. You little ripper! Senior Member

    Australia
    Australian English
    I also have not heard it outside a business context, although it seems to be from the context Vittorio gave.
     
  18. ElaineG

    ElaineG Senior Member

    Brooklyn NY
    USA/English
    Didn't mean to suggest that it wasn't alive and well in business -- just that its use in dating and relationships (as is apparently the context of Vittorio's quote) has become enormously widespread. (Do you mean to tell me in your busy life, LSP, that you're not reading enough women's magazines? Peccato:rolleyes: )
     
  19. saramattia Senior Member

    rome
    italian
    "That would be a bit of a deal breaker". Can anyone hel me with this? i have already read the other discussion on these words, but just don't understand:eek:...to give you a bit of context, the guy saying it is talking about design and in particular about a table. Thanks
     
  20. disegno

    disegno Senior Member

    San Francisco
    United States English
    A "deal breaker" is a bit of information that convinces you to enter into an agreement or to buy something.

    For instance:
    "I am not sure I want to go into business with you. The deal breaker would be if you were to offer me $10,000 more and the chance to live in Italy."

    In the situation you suggest about the table design, without knowing the full context of the situation, it might mean the unique aspect of the table design that makes it desirable above other table designs.

    "The design of the table is really wonderful, but the deal breaker is that it is made from a material that will never scratch and is virtually indestructible."
     
  21. TrentinaNE Senior Member

    USA
    English (American)
    Ciao, disegno. :)

    Most of the discussion above suggests that "deal breaker" is the opposite: it's the bit of information that convinces you to walk away from an agreement or purchase. I don't think I've heard it in the positive sense, but maybe that's a "California thing"? :confused:

    A presto,
    Elisabetta
     
  22. disegno

    disegno Senior Member

    San Francisco
    United States English
    I consider deal breaker also to be something that turns the tide or upsets the status quo.
     
  23. guixols Senior Member

    San Francisco
    USA / English, German
    I have to agree with Elisabetta. I use "deal breaker" in the negative sense. The opposite (to me) would be something that "seals the deal".
    Ciao,
    G.
     
  24. ElaineG

    ElaineG Senior Member

    Brooklyn NY
    USA/English
    Bingo!
     
  25. DCLB New Member

    Italian
    Ammazza un accordo seems a little weird... what about "cavillo?"
     
  26. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
    Come spiegato in precedenza SIGNIFICANT vuole dire esattamente l'opposto di cavillo.

     
  27. ulyssem Senior Member

    Milano, Italy
    italian
    Ma che ne dite di "spartiacque" per "deal-breaker"?
     
  28. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    Secondo me non rende la negatività del termine e comunque significa una cosa diversa.;) Dal dizionario WRF: spartiacque.
     
  29. Teerex51

    Teerex51 Senior Member

    Milan, Italy
    Italian
    I agree. Spartiacque is watershed, while deal breaker is a request or condition that kills a deal, i.e., it prevents the parties from reaching an agreement.

    Earlier posts in this thread made it sufficiently clear.;)
     
  30. ulyssem Senior Member

    Milano, Italy
    italian
    I have read the earlier posts, indeed,
    but I see the term "deal-breaker" is more and more commonly used in the relationship field,
    so, "non-smoker" is a deal-breaker, "cheating" is a deal-breaker, "gambling" is a deal-breaker,

    and in Italian you can easily pick the word "spartiacque" in a similar context: "scoprire che frequentava i casinò è stato lo spartiacque per me", surely none of the earlier definitions would work for deal-breaker in the relationship context, "spartiacque" is the only one the comes to my mind, and if you use it in this context it keeps all the "condition that kills a dead" nuance, which other term would you suggest, otherwise?
     
  31. Teerex51

    Teerex51 Senior Member

    Milan, Italy
    Italian
    It entirely depends on the context.

    Spartiacque (i.e., figuratively elemento che divide) might work - though not for me - when dealing with relationships and matters of the heart. (Personally, I would go for "ultima goccia", even though it's another metaphor and may not suit every single situation of this nature).

    In a business context, spartiacque is clearly a non-flyer. Punto di rottura (della trattativa) is an option I'd go for, but there's more.
     
  32. ulyssem Senior Member

    Milano, Italy
    italian

    "Ultima goccia" is a good one, but it's more fit to describe a gradual situation, a progression, while, in the relationship matter, "deal-breaker" is more of a "yes" or "no", closer to a criteria concept, it could even be a tool to "select" candidates, in terms of partners, as it could be a tool to describe what you will and won't take from your partner, not even once...
     
  33. Teerex51

    Teerex51 Senior Member

    Milan, Italy
    Italian
    I hear you, but I'm still not buying spartiacque and probably never will.

    I'd rather go with scoglio, muro accompanied by a suitable modifier. But I wonder what the rest of the WRF gang thinks.
     
  34. chiara78 New Member

    italiano
    Mi viene in mente "deterrente"
     

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