Del dicho al hecho hay mucho trecho

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by Artrella, May 20, 2005.

  1. Artrella Banned

    BA
    ARGENTINA Sp/Eng
    Hi! How do we say this in English? Is there an equivalent expression/saying?
    Gracias!
     
  2. Eddie

    Eddie Senior Member

    Nassau County, NY
    USA - English
    Hi, Artrella!

    There are two expressions that have been popular in the States:

    There's many a slip 'twixt cup and lip (an old saying, probably British)

    It's easier said than done (contemporary)
     
  3. Artrella Banned

    BA
    ARGENTINA Sp/Eng


    Thank you Eddie!! You are great!! :) ;) :p
     
  4. Eddie

    Eddie Senior Member

    Nassau County, NY
    USA - English
    So are you, Artrella. You don't know how many times you've helped me.
     
  5. UomoSconociuto Senior Member

    USA English
    tambien se puede decir "del dicho al hecho hay gran trecho"? creo que eso me enseno una profesora hace mucho.
     
  6. Artrella Banned

    BA
    ARGENTINA Sp/Eng

    Sí, se puede decir así también :)
     
  7. AJB Junior Member

    Palma de Mallorca, Spain
    English, United Kingdom
    Hi.
    What about, "Actions speak louder than words"?
    AJB
     
  8. mateitop

    mateitop Senior Member

    UK, English
    Yeah, if it's the same, I think "Actions speak louder than words" is a lot more common.
     
  9. fool4jesus Senior Member

    Pero no son iguales:

    "Actions speak louder than words" quiere decir "Él (casi siempre refiriendo a persona específica) bien habla sobre hacer algo, pero nunca lo hace; entonces, voy a creerlo cuando lo haga."

    "Easier said than done" quiere decir "Nos es fácil decir que vamos a hacer algo, pero más difícil hacerlo."

    O sea, lo primero refiere al intento de una persona, mientras lo segundo refiere a la dificultad en hacer algo.

    (Por favor, corrige mi español si necesita corección.)
     
  10. borgonyon

    borgonyon Modus Vivendi

    Shreveport, Louisiana
    Mexican Spanish
    Encontré esto en la página de Washington State University:
     
  11. fool4jesus Senior Member

    Tienes la razón, pero me parece que estas expressiones no signafican lo mismo con ""del dicho al hecho hay gran trecho". ¿Estoy equivocado?
     
  12. super_star Junior Member

    Spanish
    Hi! I´d like to know if there´s any close equivalent expression to the spanish idiom: " del dicho al hecho hay un trecho" or something similar that you may come up with.
    Thanks in advanced.
     
  13. Mirlo

    Mirlo Senior Member

    Missouri
    Castellano, Panamá/ USA
    From words to deeds is a great space.
    Saludos, :)
     
  14. jj3118 Senior Member

    New York-Philadelphia
    English y Español (Costa Rica)
    Easier said than done

    Saludos
     
  15. super_star Junior Member

    Spanish
    Thank you :)
     
  16. jsmedley New Member

    English - USA
    It is definitely "easier said than done." Sorry AJB, I've got to go with Eddie on this one.
     
  17. cirrus

    cirrus Senior Member

    Warwick
    UK English
    Does anyone really say that? If they do, it is not something I have come across this side of the pond. Easier said than done comes much more readily to mind.
     
  18. Södertjej

    Södertjej Senior Member

    Junto al Mediterráneo
    Spanish ES/Swedish (utlandssvensk)
    I think that's just a literal translation of the Spanish saying.
     
  19. cirrus

    cirrus Senior Member

    Warwick
    UK English
    I was tempted to be sarcastic but thought I'd check out the facts first. To my mind there's not much point in literal translations on WR - we could all take out garbage from babel fish if that's what we wanted.
     
  20. Södertjej

    Södertjej Senior Member

    Junto al Mediterráneo
    Spanish ES/Swedish (utlandssvensk)
    I know what you mean, but sarcasm is not so welcome here, so let's just assume that literal translations are just part of the learning process at some stage. And online translations are always a good laugh.
     
  21. Miguel Antonio Senior Member

    Galicia
    Galego (Rías Baixas)
    And I think this particular idiom is the equivalent of the Spanish obras son amores, que no buenas razones/intenciones
    Creo que no estás equivocado :)
     
  22. capials Senior Member

    Lot et Garonne
    English
    The English say : there's many a slip twixt cup and lip .
     
  23. Arrius

    Arrius Senior Member

    Spain
    English, UK
    The Scots poet Robert (Rabbie) Burns is often quoted even by us Sassenachs (Englishmen) to convey this meaning:
    The best laid plans of mice and men aft gang agley" (the last part is Scots dialect for often go wrong/awry). The quotation is so well known that sometimes the last three words are left out. John Steinbeck also used the quotation as the title of his novel "Of Mice and Men" in which two friends plan to start a rabbit farm together but one of them finds himself forced to kill the other out of pity.
     
  24. Södertjej

    Södertjej Senior Member

    Junto al Mediterráneo
    Spanish ES/Swedish (utlandssvensk)
    That meaning is not exactly related to the meaning of the Spanish idiom, which is often used to mean how easy it is for some to claim they do or can something but not actually doing/being able to it.

    -He says he's fluent in French.
    -I've seen him speaking French, and believe me... del dicho al hecho hay mucho trecho.
     
  25. Arrius

    Arrius Senior Member

    Spain
    English, UK
    If you are referring to my suggestion, Södertje, I agree that in the light of the following definition it doesn't seem quite the same as the thread:
    Del dicho al hecho hay un trecho
    Significado: Con este refrán se critica a quienes se vanaglorian de cosas que todavía no han hecho. Usamos este refrán para expresar desconfianza ante fanfarronerías y lo decimos porque no creemos que puedan lograr lo que dicen o porque no estamos seguros de su capacidad, de su valor para hacerlo.

    Maybe he's bitten off more than he can chew would be closer.
     
  26. Södertjej

    Södertjej Senior Member

    Junto al Mediterráneo
    Spanish ES/Swedish (utlandssvensk)
    Well, I think that definition is more or less what I said,
    so it's about thinking someone is showing off either because it's something he hasn't done yet/isn't capable of actually doing.


    I think he's bitten off more than he can chew is closer to meterse en camisas de once varas: voluntarily doing something that is more than what you can handle.
     
  27. Arrius

    Arrius Senior Member

    Spain
    English, UK
    ... or undertaking a task that is beyond one's capability, whereas in the thread phrase a person is claiming an ability he doesn't have.
    In London there is the rather vulgar comment he does wonders and sh*ts miracles that refers to a braggard making spurious claims.
     
  28. Infolio Senior Member

    Mexico Spanish
    Los hechos dicen más que las palabras = Actions speak louder than words
     
  29. Infolio Senior Member

    Mexico Spanish
    Del dicho al hecho hay mucho trecho = Easier said than done
     

Share This Page