1. Cleopatra13 New Member

    Castellano, Argentina
    Hello everybody!
    My english teacher gave me these two sentences:
    1- The party was fun but I felt like leaving it.
    2- Despite the fun party, I felt like leaving.
    I can't fully understand why in the second case you don't say "it".
    I'd be glad if you could help me out with this.
    Thanks!
     
  2. Adolfo Afogutu

    Adolfo Afogutu Senior Member

    Uruguay
    Español
    La pregunta es "I can't fully understand why in the second case you don't say "it". En la primera usan "to leave" como verbo transitivo: to leave the room, to leave the party. Es por eso que aparece "it" = "the party". En la segunda, "to leave" tiene uso intransitivo. El problema es que en español "irse" no tiene uso transitivo. En ambos casos diríamos: la fiesta estaba divertida, pero yo tenía ganas de irme; a pesar de que la fiesta estaba divertida, yo tenía ganas de irme.
    Saludos
     
  3. Cleopatra13 New Member

    Castellano, Argentina
    Muchas gracias Adolfo por tu explicación!
     
  4. The Newt

    The Newt Senior Member

    USA / EEUU
    English - US
    Here's another way of looking at it:

    1- The party was fun but I felt like leaving it.: in the red part of the sentence, there is a grammatical subject and a predicate, so that part would work as a complete sentence ("The party was fun.") "It" in the second part substitutes for "the party," so that we don't have to repeat "the party."

    2- Despite the fun party, I felt like leaving.: here "despite the fun party" has no grammatical subject and can't stand alone as a separate sentence; it's simply a clause. Since there's no grammatical subject, we can't refer back to it using the pronoun "it."
     
  5. scw2011

    scw2011 Senior Member

    USA
    American English
     
  6. levmac

    levmac Senior Member

    No longer here.
    I think it's a poor example.

    1) You don't need to say "it" in the first example either.

    2) With despite, you would use a noun or a verb.

    Despite his success (su éxito, un sustantivo), he was not happy.

    Despite being successful (a pesar de tener éxito, un verbo), he was not happy.

    3) In your context, I would say:

    Despite the fact that the party was fun, I felt like leaving.
    Despite the party being fun, I felt like leaving. (despite + sustantivo* + gerundio)

    * aquí no es un sujeto. Si metemos una persona en la frase, utilizamos o el pronombre objeto o posesivo.

    Despite him/his being successful, he was not happy.
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2014
  7. JennyTW Senior Member

    Córdoba, Spain
    English - UK
    I agree. Both examples are bad. You can tell your teacher from us, if you like. (Though be prepared for the consequences!)
     
  8. Cleopatra13 New Member

    Castellano, Argentina
    Thank you all for your input! :)
     

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