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di lungo corso

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by Murphy, May 16, 2008.

  1. Murphy

    Murphy Senior Member

    Sicily, Italy
    English, UK
    "Un agopuntore tradizionale di lungo corso"

    Is this a way of saying "with a lot of experience"?

    Many thanks.
     
  2. Rebecca Vegas

    Rebecca Vegas Senior Member

    Brescia-Lago di Garda
    Italy - Italian
    yes, I think that's what it means
     
  3. Murphy

    Murphy Senior Member

    Sicily, Italy
    English, UK
    Thank you, Rebecca :)
     
  4. Rebecca Vegas

    Rebecca Vegas Senior Member

    Brescia-Lago di Garda
    Italy - Italian
    You're welcome :)
     
  5. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    Hello!
    My great-grandfather was a long-haul sea captain, which translates to capitano di lungo corso, so I imagine that here it could well mean with a lot of experience, as you say!
    Jo
     
  6. Murphy

    Murphy Senior Member

    Sicily, Italy
    English, UK
    Thanks Jo:)
     
  7. jtbranson Junior Member

    English
    Hello,

    I'm translating the following phrase, which is part an article about a new employee at an aluminium production company, but I'm unsure of the meaning of dirigente di lungo corso.

    Ma chi è il capo del personale? Chi è questo dirigente di lungo corso, che sembra arrivato giusto in tempo per salvare lo stabilimento.

    My attempt:
    But who is the personnel manager? Who is this master craftsman that seems to arrived in time to save the establishment.

    Any insight would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks.
     
  8. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    Hello, JTB.;)

    See the previous posts.:) This is, of course, a figurative use.;)
     
  9. Teerex51

    Teerex51 Senior Member

    Milan, Italy
    Italian
    Just a heads-up: "dirigente" means manager, executive (no craftsman). "Stabilimento" is a factory or plant (no establishment).

    This, together with the figurative meaning of the modifiers long-haul, bleuewater bluewater, salty should clinch it, I guess. ;)
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2012
  10. gandolfo

    gandolfo Senior Member

    Back in Roma Roma
    English-British
    I think "old hand" "old-timer" are quite a common terms,

    Sorry Teerex but I've never heard "long-haul" used figuratively for a person nor "salty" or "bleuewater" (??):(
     
  11. Teerex51

    Teerex51 Senior Member

    Milan, Italy
    Italian
    Is that bad news? :D Sorry, I don't know you, so I have no way of telling how much you've heard or read.

    If you read the whole post, however, you'll realize our friend JT was referring to a "master craftsman", while here we're talking about an "old salt", a very experienced manager. I gave him a few figurative adjectives to play with, I did not suggest he use them "undiluted", as it were...

    I trust I've now better clarified my intentions. ;)
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2012
  12. gandolfo

    gandolfo Senior Member

    Back in Roma Roma
    English-British
    Hi Teerex:)

    I have read quite a lot:rolleyes: also I've read the thread.;) I wasn't questioning your point about "dirigente" being translated as "master craftsman" , just the figurative adjectives.

    "Old salt" to me is someone that is an old mariner who tells stories.

    Bleuewater I've never heard of in my life...:)
     
  13. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    An experienced manager is what it means, but Master Craftsman might work because the original sentence is very obviously ironic.;) If I were to say it myself, however, I might say something like this:

    So who's the Personnel Manager? Who's this man of oh-such-great experience who just comes waltzing in and acts like he's God's gift to factories/plants on the brink of closure?

     
  14. Teerex51

    Teerex51 Senior Member

    Milan, Italy
    Italian
    That's an interesting spin you put on it, LC ;)

    This is my own take.

    Who's this Human Resources manager? Who's this weathered old salt who shows up in the nick of time to save the embattled plant?
     
  15. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    Morning, Rexie.;)

    I reckon JTB will have got the drift by now.:) Mind you, he's disappeared.....
     
  16. jtbranson Junior Member

    English
    Still here. Just taking it all in. :)
     
  17. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    Got the drift? Or are you just sea-sick?:D
     
  18. jtbranson Junior Member

    English
    Ha! Yes, got the drift, thank you. Man of oh-such-great experience will do nicely, I think, because of its tone.

    Thank you :)
     
  19. Vanja85 New Member

    Naples
    Italian
    How about "long-time director"?
     

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