Difference between belief and believe

Discussion in 'English Only' started by V54, Feb 21, 2008.

  1. V54 New Member

    Hawaii
    Costa Rica, Spanish
    Hello out there!!! I want to know what is the difference between "belief" and "believe" and how I can use these words in different contexts!!
    Thank You in advance :)!!!
     
  2. Blootix Senior Member

    California
    English - USA
    Believe is a verb. Belief is a noun.

    "I believe in him."
    "I challenge his belief."
     
  3. Dimcl Senior Member

    British Columbia, Canada
    Canadian English
    Welcome to the forum, V54. I'm assuming that you haven't read the forum rules yet. You should do that fairly shortly.:)

    One of the first things that forum members will ask you is whether you've looked up these words in your dictionary. There is a Dictionary Look-up in the forum (at the top of the page) and many online dictionaries as well (Dictionary.com is a good one). Almost every dictionary will give you sample sentences.
     
  4. bibliolept

    bibliolept Senior Member

    Northern California
    AE, Español
  5. Harry Batt

    Harry Batt Senior Member

    Minneapolis
    USA English
    Blootix has recited the differences. HEre are a couple more examples: I could not believe it when I won the lottery. Jim is an atheist, but I say that every man is entitled to his belief in God, or lack of it.

    Oh, yes, Welcome to the forum Blootix.
     
  6. V54 New Member

    Hawaii
    Costa Rica, Spanish
    Aloha everyone! I understand know the difference between the two words! So, in that case, the proper way to write the following sentence is:
    "The media is demoralizing people’s beliefs today."

    Cheers!
     
  7. Dimcl Senior Member

    British Columbia, Canada
    Canadian English
    Well, you're using "beliefs" correctly but how does the media "demoralize" people's beliefs? "Beliefs" aren't demoralized - people are.
     
  8. jamesjiao

    jamesjiao Senior Member

    New Zealand English and Mandarin Chinese

    Your sentence is syntactically correct in terms of the layout of its grammatical elements; however I can't decipher the semantic relationship between the verb 'demoralizing' and the noun 'belief' - did you mean 'misleading people's beliefs'?
     
  9. Cagey post mod

    California
    English - US
    Aloha V54!

    I can see why the definition of demoralize might make you think it works in this sentence. However, demoralize is usually used in relation to people; it means something like "to weaken people's confidence (perhaps in their beliefs)" or "to discourage people from trying to accomplish things."

    Maybe you can explain more clearly what you want to say and we can help you find words.
     
  10. V54 New Member

    Hawaii
    Costa Rica, Spanish
    Aloha out there!! Thank you very much for your help. What I am trying to say is that people's beliefs have changed a lot ( for bad) since the media misleads their Cristian principles. I understand the meaning of the word belief now, but, in this case which way would be the right way to write this sentence? :confused:

    Thank You in advance, :) !!!
     
  11. Cagey post mod

    California
    English - US
    Here are a couple of possibilities:
    The media is weakening people's Christian beliefs today.

    The media is causing people to loose confidence in their Christian beliefs (or, principles). ​

    I hope other people will make suggestions as well.
     
  12. Elwintee Senior Member

    London England
    England English
    Hi, V54: If you want an alternative I suggest 'undermining people's beliefs', with the connotation of removing the ground from under them, shaking their foundations. By the way, the word media is a Latin plural so, strictly speaking you should write: 'the media are...'.
     
  13. Cagey post mod

    California
    English - US
    I prefer Elwintee's "undermining people's beliefs" to my own suggestion.

    A side note: I have no objection to treating media as a plural (with 'are'), however the singular use (with 'is') is also acceptable. From the online Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary:
    the media (NEWSPAPERS) group noun [S]
    newspapers, magazines, radio and television considered as a group:​
     
  14. I like undermining here, I think it's the best word for expressing a sense of righteous outrage in an understated way. Um. yes.
     
  15. V54 New Member

    Hawaii
    Costa Rica, Spanish
    THANK YOU PEOPLE!!! I WILL USE UNDERMINING FOR THAT SENTENCE! ALL YOUR SUGGESTIONS HELPED ME!! LOL, V54
     
  16. Harry Batt

    Harry Batt Senior Member

    Minneapolis
    USA English
    Universal education has done as much, if not more, to put people's Christian beliefs under scrutiny. Yes, we don't blame the fact that people are able now to able to read and write; able to think freely and form judgments which conflict with formerly acceptable beliefs. Is this possibly the reason that universal [public] education is on the receiving end of an undermining by the conservative extreme. I would suggest that we need to take caution when we hear code words like media, beliefs changing for the bad [when at face valuie the change only makes the belief different].
     
  17. Harry Batt

    Harry Batt Senior Member

    Minneapolis
    USA English
    Oh yes! Welcome to the forum V 54
     
  18. shahnawazkaka New Member

    urdu english sindhi
    " belief is a noun & believe is a verb .
    eg:I believe that my God is one and only One.
    I have belief that my God is One and only One.
     

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