Diffidato

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by Peppethelondoner, Feb 24, 2009.

  1. Hi friends,
    I was wondering what's the English for "diffidato" in football context. For example "Vidic era diffidato e con l'ammonizione rimediata salterà la partita con l'Inter". "Diffidato" means that the player, after being booked/cautioned by the ref, will miss the next match.
    Hope you can help me
    Peppe
     
     
    : sports
  2. TimLA

    TimLA Senior Member

    Los Angeles
    English - US
    Hi,
    Given THIS, it seems like the coach makes the decision to keep the player out of the game.
    Is that right?

    If this is the case then,
    ...the player is benched (for a game)...
    ...the player is sidelined (for a game)...
    ...the play has been pulled (for a game)...

    Does that make sense?

    PS - I don't have a clue how to say it in BE.
     
  3. Azazel81 Senior Member

    Milan
    Italy - Italian
    Hi Tim,

    sadly it is not as you said...

    When a player is "diffidato" it means he was shown a yellow card in a previous game, therefore if he gets another yellow card (not in the same game, rather in a next game) he'll miss the game after.

    Sadly I don't know the proper word though. :(
     
  4. pescara Senior Member

    Connecticut
    English-USA
    I would say "suspended (for one game)."

    Ciao.
     
  5. fer1975 Senior Member

    Vilnius, Lithuania
    Italy, Italian
    Hi Pescara, diffidato does not mean suspended. Diffidato is one step back (one yellow card) before getting suspended.
     
  6. TimLA

    TimLA Senior Member

    Los Angeles
    English - US
    Ok, but who is it that keeps the player out of the next game?
    The coach (so the player isn't thrown out of the series)
    or the referees (because it is the rule that the player cannot play in the next game)?
     
  7. pescara Senior Member

    Connecticut
    English-USA
    Sorry, I wasn't reading carefully. So, it would be something like being on probation. I can't think of another term to express it.

    Ciao.
     
  8. fer1975 Senior Member

    Vilnius, Lithuania
    Italy, Italian
    The referees.
     
  9. Azazel81 Senior Member

    Milan
    Italy - Italian
    Exactly. When a player gets the second yellow card then he's suspended (but here I know they just say "misses next match").

    We need to know how to express the previous step: after getting the first yellow card (then that match ends), a new match begins and that player is "diffidato" (if he gets a second yellow card he gets to miss next match).

    I guess it's something like "warned" :confused: What do you guys reckon?

    EDIT: you guys write too fast :D I keep getting crossposted :p Anyway, like someone said (can't remember who, sorry) it's the ref that keeps the player out if he gets the second Y.C.
     
  10. TimLA

    TimLA Senior Member

    Los Angeles
    English - US
    I'm with Pescara, in AE it would be "suspended for a game".

    If it's the rules, the player is "thown out for a game" (colloquial) or "suspended for a game" (a bit formal).
     
  11. fer1975 Senior Member

    Vilnius, Lithuania
    Italy, Italian
    I'll try to do some research but maybe cautioned fits the bill.
     
  12. Azazel81 Senior Member

    Milan
    Italy - Italian
    No, I think we're not getting to the right point.

    The point is: he's not suspended from the game yet!!! He COULD get suspende IF he gets another yellow card in a next game. But yet he hasn't. He has just received ONE yellow card.

    It's like saying: "ok, now you got this yellow card and you're warned... if you do something else you'll get suspended".

    I hope this cleared it up a bit.
     
  13. fer1975 Senior Member

    Vilnius, Lithuania
    Italy, Italian
    Hi Tim, suspended is when the player get two yellow cards and according to the rule will miss the next match.
    Diffidato is when a player gets only one yellow card and if gets a second one will be suspended for the next match.
     
  14. TimLA

    TimLA Senior Member

    Los Angeles
    English - US
    I'm still VERY confused.

    If a player does something wrong and breaks the rules, and the rules/referee require/s that the player not play in the next game, then the player is "suspended for one game".

    If a player receives a bunch of fouls, and is one foul away from being "suspended" or "thrown out of the game", the coach will place the player on the bench to "save" him for the last game or end of the game.

    A "warning" would just be the referee talking to the player and coach, and saying "If you do that again, you're out of the game".

    This is from an AE perspective only. I wouldn't have a clue about BE.
     
  15. baldpate

    baldpate Senior Member

    London
    UK, English
    Could be - or possibly "under caution". It would be the difference between the act of being shown the yellow card (being cautioned), and the state in which the player subsequently finds himself (under caution).

    So a player who has been shown the YC has been cautioned, and so becomes under caution.
     
  16. fer1975 Senior Member

    Vilnius, Lithuania
    Italy, Italian
    I assume that soccer is not very popular in the United States:)
    The rule is "a player gets suspended when the referee books him twice"
    "a player get diffidato when the referee books him only once".
     
  17. Azazel81 Senior Member

    Milan
    Italy - Italian
    Eheh... sorry. I'll try to make it clearer:

    The thing about the coach keeping out his player doesn't have anything to do with this... that's just a choice.

    Here we're dealing with soccer rules.

    1) Yellow card. When a player is shown the yellow card during a match (because he made something wrong, like a hard takle, or insulted someone, or he wasted time... anyway, something against the rules) nothing actually happens. But there COULD be consequences:
    if he gets another yellow card in the same game, he gets a RED CARD and is suspended for that game plus the next one.
    If nothing else happens instead, during that match, then he's called "diffidato", which means that: if during the next game he gets another yellow card, he can still play during that match (risking anyway a red card... see above), but he will miss the game after that.

    So...

    For instance:

    Game 1: I get a Yellow card. ok

    Game 2: I get another yellow card.

    Game 3: I'm suspended and I can't play this match

    Or

    Game 1: I get a yellow card.

    Game 2: nothing.

    Game 3: I get a yellow card.

    Game 4: I can't play because I'm suspended.

    What am I after game 1? In Italian we say "sono diffidato".

    Or

    Game 1: I get a yellow card, then I get another yellow card. I get a RED card (1 Y.C. + 1 Y.C. make 1 RED CARD).

    I hope it's clearer now.
     
  18. TimLA

    TimLA Senior Member

    Los Angeles
    English - US
    I think this is a BE/AE thing, or something particular to the rules/linguistics of soccer.:D

    Are there any AE soccer fans out there? (dead silence...:))
    Who's Beckham?:D
     
  19. Azazel81 Senior Member

    Milan
    Italy - Italian
    Weird.. and here I thought it was supposed to be the other way around... eheh... Aren't you from L.A.? :D Beckham... L.A. Galaxy... TimLA... L.A. :D
    Ring any bells? :p

    Ok, kidding aside... Sadly I'm not such an expert on American Soccer... Being 6.000 miles away is kind of a big deal. :p

    It definitely has to do with rules/linguistic of soccer.

    Any British soccer fans here? Time to wake up... :p
     
  20. TimLA

    TimLA Senior Member

    Los Angeles
    English - US
    Los Angeles? Where's that?:D
    This is the only galaxy I know.:)

    Just to prolong the pain of our European friends who actually like soccer :)))
    I've found some rules for North American Soccer.
    HERE they talk about "yellow card" being a caution (warning) and a "red card" being an "ejection".

    HERE are the Major League Soccer rules (North America).
    They talk about a "yellow card" being a "caution".
    They talk about a "red card" being a "sending off" offense (apparently they must leave the entire field - "go to the locker room").

    So there may be different rules between our two continents.

    Hmmm...perhaps some day I'll actually go see a soccer game...:D
     
  21. Azazel81 Senior Member

    Milan
    Italy - Italian
    I don't think there's a difference in the rules since it's the FIFA which sets the rules across the world.

    As for the rules you posted, yes a yellow card is LIKE a warning... is like saying "one more and you're off the field". A Red Card instead means "go out of the field" and you get automatically suspended for at least 1 game.

    But this is still not what we wanted to know.. sorry Tim, but thanks for trying ;)
     
  22. Actually, you are diffidato after getting 3 yellow cards in non-consecutive matches (at least in Italian Serie A) or 2 yellow cards in consecutive matches. SEE HERE and HERE.
     
  23. Take a look HERE at DE ROSSI BAN.
    As Azazel said, we need to know how would you say, in English, the status of a player before getting booked by the ref for the third time during the same competition. Is a bit clearer now, friends?
     
  24. Azazel81 Senior Member

    Milan
    Italy - Italian
    Right... So example 2 in one of my previous posts was slightly wrong.. sorry.. And thanks for correcting me.

    The point is.. we're still missing the right answer here :(
     
  25. effeundici Senior Member

    Italy
    Italian - Tuscany
    Uhhf, soccer is very strange in the USA. They use very small and hard balls. And it must be very dangerous because each player carries a club to defend himself.:D:D
     
  26. Exactly Azazel :)
    A player is suspended after being booked for three times in the same competition. Is there a way to say, in English, after 2 bookings the status of a footballer?
     
  27. An example of a player who was "diffidato" is Daniele De Rossi, Roma's midfielder. Yesterday he was "diffidato" and because of the yellow card he collected yesterday evening he will miss next match.
    Villa Fan suggested me this expression: "X Y is playing under the threat of suspension if he gets another yellow card", that basically means that X Y is diffidato.
    Unless someone has found something better, I have to say that (maybe :D) in English there isn't a word to translate "diffidato" :(
     
  28. pandinorombante

    pandinorombante Senior Member

    Around Europe
    Italy - Italian
    Hi everyone,

    I guess there's no straight word to translate "diffidato".. though I found this article talking about some players being "diffidati":

    "While those three are absent, six Lyon players are within a yellow card of missing out on a potential appearance in the Santiago Bernabéu final on 22 May..."

    Therefore "essere diffidato" is close to being within a yellow card of getting suspended and missing the following match, something around that.

    Cheers!

    Pandino
     
  29. You little ripper! Senior Member

    Australia
    Australian English
    Wiktionary translates 'diffidare' with to caution/warn (already suggested by Azazel and baldpate).

    This
    website says: A player is cautioned and shown the yellow card if he commits any of the following seven offenses:

    These websites also use 'cautioned' and 'warned' in this context.
     
  30. Thank you both guys :)
     
  31. Murphy

    Murphy Senior Member

    Sicily, Italy
    English, UK
    What British football commentators usually say during a game is "he's already on a yellow card/on two yellow cards etc" or "he's already been cautioned once/twice etc ... (so he has to be careful)".

    There is no straight one word translation for "diffidato", as far as I know.
     
  32. I get it, but still hope someone can help us to find a proper translation. let's hope!!!
     
  33. fer1975 Senior Member

    Vilnius, Lithuania
    Italy, Italian

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