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diga (phone, talking)

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by JieXian, Mar 29, 2012.

  1. JieXian Senior Member

    English, Chinese, Malay
    Hola,

    When a spanish guy answers the phone he'd say "diga" or while talking to someone they might say "digame". What does it mean exactly?

    At first it sounded a bit rude, like saying SPEAKor SPEAK UP! but I slowly got used to it.

    Thanks
     
  2. blasita

    blasita Senior Member

    Spanish - Spain (Madrid)
    Well, I just see it (diga/dígame) as a set expression when you answer the phone and don't know who's calling (a kind of saying 'hello?'). It's not rude at all.

    There are also some other ways of answering the phone.

    Saludos.
     
  3. JieXian Senior Member

    English, Chinese, Malay
    ah... of course I found out after some time that it isn't rude. So it's just like how we say "Hello" in English?
     
  4. blasita

    blasita Senior Member

    Spanish - Spain (Madrid)
    To me it is.

    Now, there are different set phrases when answering the phone (regional and personal preferences). At home I usually say just: ¿Sí...? But sometimes also: ¿Diga?; and when I see the number (someone I know is calling), it changes to Dime, Hola X, etc.
     
  5. andy town Senior Member

    Madrid, Spain
    English Ireland
    Hello. By using the subjunctive, you show politeness.
    Andy
     
  6. JieXian Senior Member

    English, Chinese, Malay
    AH ok, thanks for the explainations, I thought it was the imperative
     
  7. SydLexia Senior Member

    London
    UK, English
    "unos veinte, digamos" means "about twenty, let's say" and is the first person plural of the same thing.

    It is an imperative but not an 'imperious' one.

    syd
     
  8. blasita

    blasita Senior Member

    Spanish - Spain (Madrid)
    OK, I'd just call it an 'expression' (expresión con la que se interpela, de manera educada, a alguien para que hable al teléfono). I'd say it's an imperative, but again, I'd just consider it as a set expression in this context.
     
  9. JieXian Senior Member

    English, Chinese, Malay
    Ya understood - you can just translate that directly into English haha
    Thanks.
     
  10. JieXian Senior Member

    English, Chinese, Malay
    Correction: I meant : you can't* just translate it directly.
     

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