dijo que venía/vendría

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Grammar / Gramática Español-Inglés' started by SharpBlade, Nov 16, 2012.

  1. SharpBlade

    SharpBlade Junior Member

    Stockholm
    Swedish
    Hello everyone!

    I saw the following sentence in a Spanish placement test: "Andrés dijo que venía el próximo fin de semana a Salamanca."

    If I'd been asked to translate this sentence from English I'd have used vendría instead of venía. Would that have been wrong or could I actually use both in this case?
     
  2. Gabriel Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    Argentina / Español
    I think that both are right but with a slight different meaning, or reporting a slightly different original sentence:

    Dijo que venía ("Voy") / Dijo que vendría ("Iré")
    He said he was coming ("I'm going") / He said he would come ("I'll go")
     
  3. SharpBlade

    SharpBlade Junior Member

    Stockholm
    Swedish
    Ah, nice explanation. Thanks! I was worried vendría was wrong.:)
     
  4. Gabriel Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    Argentina / Español
    I've said "I think"...
     
  5. JB

    JB Senior Member

    Santa Monica, CA, EEUU
    English (AE)
    This doesn't strike me as standard Spanish, and I know Argentina (home of Gabriel) often has "non-standard" (compared with most of Latin America) usages. I am also guessing that a Swedish Spanish placement test is based on usage in Spain.
    I wonder if other native speakes have an opinion.
     
  6. KirkandRafer

    KirkandRafer Senior Member

    Español (Murcia, España)
    Strictly speaking that may be the reason. In practice, however, I think that most people use the imperfect no matter what the referred person said. It's just the common usage, at least over here. It's probably wrong, but it's the way people speak. I myself do it, although I try to be more strigent when writing.
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2012
  7. neal41 Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA, English
    A. Voy a Salamanca el próximo fin de semana.
    B. Iré a Salamanca el próximo fin de semana.

    Creo que A es más común que B. ¿Hay una diferencia en significado?

    C. I go to Salamanca next weekend.
    D. I will go to Salamanca next weekend.

    D. es más común, pero C y D tienen el mismo significado.
     
  8. KirkandRafer

    KirkandRafer Senior Member

    Español (Murcia, España)
    Sí, A es más común que B. El significado de ambas es prácticamente el mismo, la diferencia es que al usar el presente el hablante de alguna forma indica que siente la acción como mucho más cercana. Por eso cuando se habla de semanas o días casi siempre se usa A, dado que es algo inminente, mientras que la alternancia entre A y B es frecuente cuando se habla de meses e incluso años, y ahí entra más en juego lo que comentaba de la perspectiva del hablante.
     
  9. micafe

    micafe Senior Member

    United States
    Spanish - Colombia
    What doesn't? I don't understand what you're talking about:eek:

    To me, there is no problem with these two expressions. The easiest way to understand the difference is with the translation:

    "Andrés dijo que venía el próximo......." = "Andrés said he was coming ......"

    "Andrés dijo que vendría el próximo......." = "Andrés said he would come ...."

    Both are correct as Gabriel said. The first one is more commonly used in the spoken language.

    This is another way to say that: "Andrés dijo que iba a venir el próximo...." = Andrés said he was going to come..."

    All of them are correct and used. :)
     
  10. neal41 Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA, English
    I don't think that translations help much because the two sentences in English have the same meaning. I understand the difference in meaning that KirkandRafer explained in answer to my previous question.
     
  11. gengo

    gengo Senior Member

    The problem is the verb "come" here, because "I am coming" and "I will come" are synonymous in English (in certain contexts), whereas "estoy yendo" and "iré" are not in Spanish.

    This is called reported speech (as I'm sure you all know), and here is how it is if we change the verb.

    quoted speech:
    He said, "I will give Jack a call."

    reported speech:
    He said he would give Jack a call. :tick:
    He said he was giving Jack a call. :cross:
     
  12. aprendiendo argento

    aprendiendo argento Senior Member

    Premantura - Croatia
    Croatian (Chakavian)
    ''Vengo mañana'' ---> Dijo que venía mañana.
    ''Voy a venir mañana''-> Dijo que iba a venir mañana.
    ''Vendré mañana'' ---> Dijo que vendría mañana.

    ---

    He said, "I'm going to call her tomorrow."
    He said he was going to call her tomorrow. (
    Different than: he was going to call her but then he stopped because he didn't want to mess with her life even more)
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2012
  13. SevenDays Senior Member

    Spanish
    Verbs, in addition to their temporality meaning (past, present, future), also have semantic value: the present form, because it's taken to be a time in progress, expresses more certainty than the future, which is yet to be: dijo que viene (more certainty, present in progress)/ dijo que vendrá(less certainy, future yet realized). The imperfect is often called the present in the past, and therefore it too expresses more certainty than the conditional, which is viewed as the future in the past: dijo que venía (more certainty, present in the past in progress)/dijo que vendría (less certainty, future in the past yet to be realized). As has already been said, both are correct; the only difference is semantic: the degree of certainty expressed.
    Cheers
     
  14. juan082937 Senior Member

    español
    El imperfecto de indicativo ( Imperfect Past)

    There are three types :
    1.- Imperfect of conatu or conative, it means actions they are going to start
    Precisamente ahora me marchaba : estaba a punto o iniciaba la marcha.
    2.- Unreal imperfect or hypothetical
    Debían ahorcarlos
    Deberían ahorcarlos
    Si tuviera dinero te daba algo or te daría algo
    3.- Polite usage of the Imperfect , it means intention
    Venía a ver a Don Miguel .
     

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