dikit

Discussion in 'Tagalog and Filipino Languages' started by robbie_levron, Mar 11, 2010.

  1. robbie_levron

    robbie_levron New Member

    Gold Coast, Australia
    English - Australia
    Hello please help me.

    I'm still trying to get a grasp on the differences between these verb forms for 'dikit'
    • Magdikit
    • Idikit
    • Manikit
    Thanks
     
  2. niernier

    niernier Senior Member

    Manila, Philippines
    Bicol & Filipino
    dikit as a verb means to stick, or glue something

    manikit means "to get thoroughly stuck to"

    idikit and magdikit are both imperative forms of the verb, idikit being the passive form and magdikit, the active form.

    Ex.

    Idikit mo ang papel sa dingding. - Paste the paper on the wall.
    Magdikit ka ng papel sa dingding - Paste some paper on the wall.
     
  3. Xinito Senior Member

    San Diego, CA
    English
    Niernier, your two examples don't show "passive" or "active", I don't think. It only shows that you've changed it from "the paper" to "some paper", but the meaning is the same in English (active, I think). I say this because I don't know the difference between the two as far as explaining them, but I just know which one to use depending on the context. Maybe instead of "passive" and "active", the difference between "idikit" and "magdikit" has something to do with something specified (a specific sheet of paper), or general (any piece of paper)... (?)
     
  4. niernier

    niernier Senior Member

    Manila, Philippines
    Bicol & Filipino
    Yes, it also has something to do with something specified (a specific sheet of paper), or general (any piece of paper) :tick: So the object of idikit would be something which is specified and the object of magdikit is something indefinite or general.

    In English, if you view them both as active, then I can't really argue on that anymore. I am not a native English speaker after all. :p

    At least in Tagalog, the imperative form of any verb can take two forms -- active and passive. When we talk about the "active" form of the verb, it takes a nominative pronoun, which is "ka" in my example. On the other hand, the passive form takes a possessive pronoun, which is "mo" in my example.

    To elaborate further the difference between our passive and active verbs:

    Paste the paper on the wall. -> our Tagalog sentence tells you specifically what to do with the paper. (Passive)

    Paste some paper on the wall -> our Tagalog sentence tells you what to do. (active)
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2010
  5. Equinozio Junior Member

    Tagalog
    Magdikit and idikit are used in sentences with a different Point of Departure.

    See explanation here:
    learningtagalog.com/grammar/2_8_the_pod_and_the_news.html
    learningtagalog.com/grammar/2_9_combining_the_pod_and_the_news.html
    learningtagalog.com/grammar/2_31_roles_of_the_pod.html

    The Point of Departure (POD) is also known as the subject, topic, trigger, focus, theme etc.

    Magdikit - to stick
    POD: doer
    Nagdikit ako ng mga poster sa bayan.
    I stuck up (some) posters in town.

    Idikit - to stick
    POD: object
    Idinikit/dinikit ko ang mga poster sa bayan.
    I stuck up the posters in town.
    (The person you are talking to already knows about the posters.)

    Manikit - to stick or become stuck partially or temporarily
    POD: doer (In a few cases, the "doer" of an action is the person or thing undergoing the action or a state.)
    Nanikit sa carpet ang dumi.
    The dirt/poo stuck to the carpet/got stuck in the carpet.
     
  6. robbie_levron

    robbie_levron New Member

    Gold Coast, Australia
    English - Australia
    Thank you :)
     
  7. Ajura Senior Member

    English
    The language of manila is different from the language of batangas the problem is no linguists study these idioms, before the advent of education they were uninteligible.
     
  8. Xinito Senior Member

    San Diego, CA
    English
    Sorry, this is way late. I just re-visited this issue and thought I'd mentioin something else that I JUST NOW thought about that may also be a clue....and perhaps does have something to do with how the forms for the verb DIKIT differ in context.

    IDIKIT - is used when you are requesting, asking, ordering, telling, etc. someone to do the "sticking" of an object, and the the verb is changed because the action is being done by a specific individual (YOU).

    MAGDIKIT - although the action is performed by (an) individual(s), the activity is described moreso for the object being stuck and the object on which to stick it (paper to wall).
     
  9. mataripis

    mataripis Senior Member

    hello robbie_levron! magdikit and idikit mean" attach "and manikit= dried already and left attached to the surface.. These words are informal to native speakers.
     

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