dime con quien [quién] andas y te dire quien [diré quién] eres

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by shomisto, Dec 18, 2006.

  1. shomisto New Member

    spain
    Hola, tengo una duda,

    ¿¿Cómo podría traducir la frase "dime con quién andas... y te diré quién eres"??

    Muchas gracias.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 21, 2011
  2. krolaina

    krolaina Senior Member

    Madrid
    Spanish, Spain
    Hola Shomisto,

    Su equivalente en inglés: hunt with cats and you catch only rats
     
  3. shomisto New Member

    spain
    joer, nada que ver jejeje

    muchichimas gracias Krolaina!!:)
     
  4. dinis.dinis Senior Member

    USA/English
    I would substitute, "BIRDS OF A FEATHER FLOCK TOGETHER", which conveys the idea that people tend to associate with persons of similar interests or personality traits.

    Yours,
    Dinis
     
  5. Manuel G. Rey

    Manuel G. Rey Senior Member

    No me resisto a añadir otros refranes españoles de sentido similar:
    Quien con lobos anda, al áño aúlla.
    Quien con un cojo pasea, al año cojea.
     
  6. shyguy84 Senior Member

    Edinburgh, Scotland. A chilly place!!
    English, United Kingdom
    Does the following text/phrase mean 'Birds of a feather flock together' in Spanish, or am I way off base? I have no idea, as that's not what it looks like to me, he he!!

    Dime con quien andas y te diré quien eres!

    Muchas gracias
     
  7. beg Senior Member

    Galicia
    Spain - Spanish
    yes, that's what it means. you can judge a man by the company he keeps
     
  8. carola_fariasm Senior Member

    Santiago, CHILE
    Spanish
    Perfect!
    Taht is the correct meaning of that saying in English into Spanish
     
  9. scotu Senior Member

    Paradise: LaX.Nay.Mex.
    Chicago English
    Otra frase hecho:"A man is known by the company he keeps"

    "birds of a feather..." can also be translated as ...los coyotes no se juntan con los lobos.
     
  10. elcielo Senior Member

    Delaware USA
    USA English
    A more literal translation would be "tell me with who you walk and I will tell you who you are".

    Como dice Beg "you can judge a man by the company he keeps" es lo mismo contexto.

    cielo
     
  11. shyguy84 Senior Member

    Edinburgh, Scotland. A chilly place!!
    English, United Kingdom
    Thank you everyone. Just one more phrase I will add to my memory bank, :).

    Muchas gracias.
     
  12. karen_i3a New Member

    Philippines and Filipino
    Hola!

    Soy de Filipinas y yo hablo mucho Ingles. Por ahora, estoy estudiando espanol en Instituto Cervantes y generalmente, puedo entenderlo. No soy una profesional pero yo creo que esa frase: "Dime con quien andas y te dire quien eres" se dice en Ingles : "Tell me whom you walk with and I'll tell you who you are."

    Anyways, ya me tengo que ir. Espero que esto ayude. Hay tambien una definicion o traduccion en Microsoft Encarta debajo de frases o proverbios de Argentina.


    -Karen xoxo
     
  13. Txiri

    Txiri Senior Member

    USA English
    Birds of a feather ...
     
  14. Manuel G. Rey

    Manuel G. Rey Senior Member

    ¡Muy bien, Karen xoxo!
     
  15. RushHourOfBabel

    RushHourOfBabel Senior Member

    English - Canada
    Birds of a feather flock together doesn't dig as deep or as personal as "dime con quien andas...". I would go with "tell me who you hang out with, and I'll tell you who you are." A slightly different version, but one that captures the context that 'dime con quien andas...' is usually used in would be Kurt Vonnegut's quote from 'Mother Night', "you are who you pretend to be".
     
  16. david314

    david314 Senior Member

    Clayton, Missouri
    American English
    .... : A man is judged by the company (that) he keeps.

    Daddy always says,"If you lie down with dogs, you get fleas."
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2011
  17. paya06dox New Member

    Costa Rican Spanish
    si bueno realmente todas esas opciones están bien... el problema es el factor regional o dialectal en donde usted quiera usar esa frase
     
  18. RushHourOfBabel

    RushHourOfBabel Senior Member

    English - Canada
    See I disagree with this interpretation. "Dime con quien andas..." doesn't refer to what people will think of you (how you will be judged), but instead refers to your true being ("quien eres").
     
  19. david314

    david314 Senior Member

    Clayton, Missouri
    American English
    You draw an interesting distinction. ;)
     
  20. srta chicken Senior Member

    California
    US English
    But people DO judge others on the company they keep.
     
  21. RushHourOfBabel

    RushHourOfBabel Senior Member

    English - Canada
    I agree with you Ms. Pollo. But this forum is not for debating the value of statements, it's for translating their meaning, whether they're true or not.

    At least I hope that when I'm posting a query in the forum that people aren't evaluating it on it's truth and responding with slightly different translations that they're more in agreement with.
     
  22. srta chicken Senior Member

    California
    US English
    Sorry! I didn't think I was debating the value of the statement--my intention was to point out that since people make that comment about others they've only seen and not even met, to ignore that aspect of meaning would render an incomplete translation.

    Saludos.
     
  23. RushHourOfBabel

    RushHourOfBabel Senior Member

    English - Canada
    Interesting.

    I was thinking that the original "Dime con quien...." doesn't make any mention of judging. This is too much for my lazy Sunday mind. I'm going to bed.
     
  24. paya06dox New Member

    Costa Rican Spanish
    Mmm well actually we Spanish speakers give that phrase the connotation of how you will be judged RushHourOfBabel
     

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